1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Upset I keep bending rims

    I have a cheaper, older giant boulder se. my style is freeride and a little bit of urban.

    I bent a rim today practicing simple bunny hops on pavement. i'm a heavier rider at 195 lbs, I was heavier before I started mountain biking a little less than a year ago.

    this is the second bent rim (granted my buddy bent the first, he's around 175 lbs). what is happening? is it because the bike/wheels are cheap? because I'm a heavier rider? a combination of both?

    I've fallen in love with mountain biking and as much as I'd like to, I just can't get a new bike right now. I recently crashed my '06 CBR and the rebuild is where my money is going.

    what is the best solution to this?

  2. #2
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    It's partly because that is not a freeride bike at all, but that's only so much of an excuse. I'm going to say it's a technique problem. At around a buck fifty myself, I can stick 3-4 foot drops to flat cement on XC rims, so a bunnyhop shouldn't bend a rim. If you do a search on here, a couple people have posted video tutorials on the subject.
    Also, make sure that your wheels are true and correctly tensioned. Once a wheel starts to go out of true, it gets worse and worse faster and faster because of the way the load cycles around the wheel as it rolls.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swashbuckler
    what is the best solution to this?
    Reprioritize (less moto, more bike).

    Seriously, machine-built rims that haven't been taken to a mechanic right off the bat for a rebuild are going to bend (from my experience).

    You should be able to pick up a set of something more sturdy for about $200.

  4. #4
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    [QUOTE=CheeseSoda
    Also, make sure that your wheels are true and correctly tensioned. Once a wheel starts to go out of true, it gets worse and worse faster and faster because of the way the load cycles around the wheel as it rolls.[/QUOTE]
    I'm not positive what a 'true' wheel is, but this kind of sounds like what happened, it got worse and worse. and there was no visible bend.

  5. #5
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    A true wheel is a wheel that spins true, with no side to side wobble or up and down hop. It is not bent, but the tension on the spokes is uneven, causing the rim to not be round.

    My guess is the wheels are not strong enough for what you want them to do. The stock rims on my rockhopper needed to be trued after every ride, they were machine built, I don't think the shop went over them well when the bike was assembled, and they were crappy wheels to begin with.

    A set of sun rhyno lites with XT hubs and decent spokes will run around $200. They can be ordered much less from bicyclewheelwarehouse.com however. They're not light, but they're strong, and not too expensive.

  6. #6
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    thanks for the advice. how do I 're-true' a wheel?

  7. #7
    Rod
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    This was mentioned earlier, but I doubt your spokes were tensioned properly. Check this and it should be the problem. I don't think I could bend my rims bunny hopping. I had a Giant Yukon and I would go off 3 feet drops onto flat concrete without problems.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swashbuckler
    thanks for the advice. how do I 're-true' a wheel?
    never mind, I just looked it up.

  9. #9
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    azonic outlaws are heavy but very tough and can be ordered for under 250

    http://wheelworld.com/itemdetails.cfm?ID=6316

  10. #10
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    Swashbuckler - Just be careful when truing your rims. Go slow, pay attention to which direction you are turning your spoke wrench. Go around the wheel with several passes, making small (1/4) turns on the spokes (nipples rather) at a time.

    It is easy to mess a rim up by going too fast. Go slow, you'll get the hang of it.

  11. #11
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    I took it to the shop this time. I'm VERY new to this whole bike with out a 600cc race motor in it thing.

    the guy at the shop was kind enough to let me stand next to him while he did it. i still have a lot of learning to do.

    it doesn't help that my bike is a 7 year old giant made for a 150 lb teenager.

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