1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    I just got my new GF Wahoo Bike, whtas first?

    I just bought my new Gary Fisher Wahoo 09 for $520.00. What should I do to the bike or buy? The bike is set up and ready to go though. For example, I need front and rear lights, and a kickstand (got already). what else?

    thanks

  2. #2
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    A trail to ride it on?

    Seriously,you should get a saddle bag that will fit tools and emergency repair equipment and if you take longer rides a hydration pack such as an camelbak.Oh,and learning how to do minor repairs on the trail would be a good thing also.

  3. #3
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    Saddlebag? I just toss all my stuff into my backpack, no annoying rattle from the bike to worry about.

    I recently purchased a Wahoo as well and ran it through the local trails. I ran it pretty aggressively and even had a decent wipe out. Everything held up fine. You probably don't need to buy anything additional for the bike; maybe a bashguard if the trails you ride on have a lot of large rocks or trees. If you're really paranoid like I am, bring a bike multi tool, a mini pump, and a spare tube as well as a patch kit for the ride. I managed to get a flat on my third or so ride out, and that was just on pavement; the patch kit proved useful.

  4. #4
    jalopy jockey
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    For what to get see the sticky on top Mountain Bike Ride Packing List

    Ditch the death stand it will mess up you or your frame.

    remove the reflectors or the trail will.

    you only need lights if your night riding. which I say get your legs under you first.

    Of course all of this is predicated on the assumption that you are going to ride trail. if you got a Wahoo for the town cruiser, well all bets are off. Get some tassles and a basket. stick a baseball card in the spokes, the more expensive the better the sound.

    Like the previous posters said thouigh some way to carry your tools and hydration. be it saddle bag and bottles or justa camel back stuffed to teh gills. that is up to you. Please search for the numerous debates on Bottle vs C.B. each has thnier place. You need to figure you out.

  5. #5
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    Ride it! get some dirt on the tires...

    I bought a 06 Wahoo to see if I was actually going to get into MTBing. I first took all the reflecters off and got a camelbak to hold tubes, tools, pumps and H2O. After I got my legs I stepped up the pedals to CB EggBeaters and then that was it oah and a WTB saddle. I ended up selling it after 1.5 years of hard riding on it and upped it up to a Spec Stumpy Elite.

    All I have to say is that Wahoo can take a beating and still keep ticking... just ride the hell out of it and have fun.

    All in all it is not really worth upgrading that bike too much.

    Tom

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ktse
    If you're really paranoid like I am, bring a bike multi tool, a mini pump, and a spare tube as well as a patch kit for the ride.
    You don't have to be paranoid to bring the basic tools needed to fix mechanical issues and flats; everyone should bring such items unless they plan to do a lot of walking.

    To the OP: the above items (and maybe lights if you plan to commute w/ your bike) are some necessary things to buy. Also, get a water bottle (and bottle cage if your bike doesn't have one) or a hydration pack, some sweat-wicking clothes, and definitely a helmet if you don't already have one. But, don't fall into the upgrade trap and start replacing components right and left, unless they break, of course.

    Like someone else said, forget the kickstand and tear off the reflectors.

  7. #7
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    HELMET!!!
    I can't believe nobody brought that up first....
    Safety first, then comes the fun.

    And +100 on loosing the kickstand...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by McDowell_Matt
    HELMET!!!
    I can't believe nobody brought that up first....
    Safety first, then comes the fun.

    And +100 on loosing the kickstand...

    I did.... it's back there a bit. I wouldn't sleep well tonight with out pointing that out to you.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Al
    and definitely a helmet if you don't already have one.
    Missed that earlier... Sorry bout that...

  10. #10
    Singletrack +1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ral83178
    Ride it! get some dirt on the tires...

    I bought a 06 Wahoo to see if I was actually going to get into MTBing. I first took all the reflecters off and got a camelbak to hold tubes, tools, pumps and H2O. After I got my legs I stepped up the pedals to CB EggBeaters and then that was it oah and a WTB saddle. I ended up selling it after 1.5 years of hard riding on it and upped it up to a Spec Stumpy Elite.

    All I have to say is that Wahoo can take a beating and still keep ticking... just ride the hell out of it and have fun.

    All in all it is not really worth upgrading that bike too much.

    Tom

    I think that might be the best list of stuff to give someone looking for advice. Tires, saddle, and some EggBeaters (perhaps optional, but shouldn't be), and a somewhat low buck ride can really be very competent and comfortable. And if ya look at it, its probably the LEAST pricey list of things you can do without making yourself wonder why you didn't just buy the next level bike. +1 for all of your post.
    1x9 Hardtail, yummy.....

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