1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    I got a Mongoose Blackcomb

    Hello, I am new here, and I purchased a Mongoose Blackcomb from, what I guess you guys call it, Wally World . Well, I heard from another message board, that its a bad bike, its built really crappy. I got it boxed up, and I assembled it myself.

    Some info about me, first:

    I'm 16, and weigh about 190 pounds. I guess you can say, I am average...I ski in the winter. I am a beginner with mountain biking. I don't want to do anything rough, or hard core. Just go to state parks, and have a ride on the trails there. I also need to burn off some calories, and make my legs stronger so I can ski in the winter, and start to race.

    So with this Mongoose Blackcomb, what do you guys think about it? Do you think I got a good bike for 300 bucks? My dad got it for me, but thats not the point.

    Will I be disappointed with this bike in the long run? I read a few other posts here, and there was someone that got a bike like this one, and it was an entry bike, and people said, if you really get into it, you can always get a better bike. So what do you think?


    Thank you,

    A n()()b on a Mongoose....I know how to ride, don't worry, just don't know what bikes there are....

  2. #2
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    As long as it enables you to go out riding and enjoy the trails don't see how it could be a dissapointment.

    If for any reason your experience after riding it for a while is that it is lacking in this or that area you can then focus your energies on saving for an upgrade for a part or some point in the future a different bike.

    For the time being just check it out, see how it feels, see what you like.
    Not much for a man to ask I dare say.. the simple maturity to ensure a limitless supply of clean socks.

  3. #3
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    You will be disappointed with it in the future. It is not a quality machine. I call bikes like that, Walgooses.

    I'm sorry, but that is the truth as I see it. Have fun on it if you can. Some say that is all that matters. I disagree... but wadda ya do?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 29Colossus
    You will be disappointed with it in the future. It is not a quality machine. I call bikes like that, Walgooses.

    I'm sorry, but that is the truth as I see it. Have fun on it if you can. Some say that is all that matters. I disagree... but wadda ya do?

    Well, like I said, I am not a hardcore rider....Just going off the paved path once in a while....

  5. #5
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    I thought to myself: "Come on 29C you scrooge! Why don't you check it out just to make sure your words were warranted... give the new guy a break..."

    That is when I looked at the bike... OMG... It is a disaster waiting to happen. It isn't going to be giving you a break either at 46 ever-lovin, body scrubin, super-smashing pounds.



    46

    I'm sure you can find some fun on it though... 46lbs.... I know what direction I would want to be going, and that is down, but going down on it would scare me. I guess just make sure everything is tight and point it.


  6. #6
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    I tried my bike out, but it had a few flaws....The gears were flawed.

    The gear indicator said it was on gear 7, but on the gear itself, it looked as if, it was on gear 8. When I gear down, as I was pedaling, the it jerked the pedals....making my foot fly off.

    Are there any quick fixes for this? Other than those problems, the bike is a charm.

  7. #7
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    here's some help

    read the sticky post at the top of this forum about beginners and Dept. Store bikes; note Mongoose is mentioned. That will give you a clear idea of what your bike will/won't do for you.

    Unfortunately, it will perform for you as well as a $100 pair of skis and boots from the same store.

    hopefully you will be able to have some fun, but keep an eye on bolts and nuts and check if often to make sure it's safe to ride.

    Jim

  8. #8
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    I don't think I have EVER seen Walmart carry Skis or boots...

  9. #9
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    My brother has one of those bikes.. he got it 3 or so years ago. If your purpose is to get in shape/keep in shape for the winter this bike will certainly do that. Its like dragging a concrete block behind you.

    But like others have said, if it suits your needs it'll be fine. You said your not hardcore into the hobby so the bike will suit you well as an introduction to the sport. IN a year if you decide you really enjoy the sport you can focus on purchasing a new bike. I would not under any circumstance upgrade a component to this bike.. its best to run it into the ground while saving up to purchase a better bike such as a specialized rock hopper or similar.

    Make sure you only take this guy on easy terrain as well. My brother recently destroyed his going off a jump he made in the back yard.. granted he didnt know what he was doing and that contributed to the destruction of the bike but it isnt built to take too much of a beating.

    Enjoy it and have fun. Your dad bought it for you so it didnt hurt your pocket. Its only a bad bike relative to what most people on this forum are used to.

  10. #10
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    can you say accident waiting to happen??? for 300 there are much better deals around...

  11. #11
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    I have ben riding a mongoose x200 dual suspension bike for the last year.
    Not to make you feel bad but got it for only 120 bucks it was a floor model closeout or somthing so it was even already put togather.
    I managed to ride it 5 or 6 days a week before work and on days off with my dog for exercise for both of us

    Yes it was (may it rest in peace) a piece of crap.

    The good news is I will always have a fond memory of that old piece of crap. We were on so many adventures and saw so many interesting things togather like wildlife and natural stuff. or the mishaps we had like the time my dog spotted a rabbit and darted right in front of the bike I hit the front brake so hard I went flying over the handle bars.
    That old bike don't owe me a thing.

    More bad news though in shopping for a new bike recently I spotted 2 I really liked for under $300 one was a boulder aluminum frame the SE I think they call it.
    The other a trek 3900
    Is it to late to take it back and get one of these? I think Walmart has a deecent return policy.

    If not hopefully you can make memorys with your yours like I did with mine and one day when your riding a better bike fondly recall that old piece of crap you use to have and all the things you did on it.

  12. #12
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    I think that JimC. made a good point. In skiing just like bicycling performance and cost are positively correlated. I know that Walmart doesn't sell ski equipment (not yet) but imagine what level of quality you could buy if Walmart did. It sounds like skiing is your primary sport so hopefuly this analogy will put things in perspective for you (assuming you don't use generic skis, etc.) As for your goal of using biking to crosstrain I doubt you will be able to acomplish much with a department store bike. In order to benifit from ridding you'll need to ride for exdended periods of time which may be intolerable on a "one size fits all bike" and secondly, you'll need to ride on challenging terrain (i.e. uphills/downhills, trails) that a department store bike is not designed for. Therefore, for comfort and safety reasons I don't think that a "Walgoose" will meet your need to crosstrain for skiing; your bike will limit your perfromance because that is not its intended use. That being said, any bike can provide fun if you understand the limits of its utility.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyoman
    I think that JimC. made a good point. In skiing just like bicycling performance and cost are positively correlated. I know that Walmart doesn't sell ski equipment (not yet) but imagine what level of quality you could buy if Walmart did. It sounds like skiing is your primary sport so hopefuly this analogy will put things in perspective for you (assuming you don't use generic skis, etc.) As for your goal of using biking to crosstrain I doubt you will be able to acomplish much with a department store bike. In order to benifit from ridding you'll need to ride for exdended periods of time which may be intolerable on a "one size fits all bike" and secondly, you'll need to ride on challenging terrain (i.e. uphills/downhills, trails) that a department store bike is not designed for. Therefore, for comfort and safety reasons I don't think that a "Walgoose" will meet your need to crosstrain for skiing; your bike will limit your perfromance because that is not its intended use. That being said, any bike can provide fun if you understand the limits of its utility.

    Yeah, I understand. Once again, I am not going off cliffs, and I will use it just for exercise. I will make sure I know the limits of this bike. Yeah, I have Atomic Skis from a few years back. Getting a new pair before next winter. Probably another pair of Atomics.....


    But does anyone know what I can do to fix my bike without paying 100 bucks? I mean, my dad knows his way around a bike. He fixed many bikes in his life. Hes an engineer so I think he can handle fixing gears....

  14. #14
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    here's more help

    from your post I think (but could be wrong) that your rear dérailleur is in need of adjustment. here's some reading & pics for you so you can try to adjust it yourself.

    here: http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html

    Secondly there's a barrel adjuster on the cable at the handlebars for fine tuning, check Sheldon's site for how that works too.

    It's confusing at first but if you get in a mess, any good LBS will sort it our for you for not a lot of loot, probably $10-$25. lean over the mechanic's shoulder and watch how he does it...you may have to do it yourself out on a trail.

    good luck, Jim


  15. #15
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    Alright....Thanks a lot! That hopefully will help....I have to go to the dentist, but after I will try to fix it..

  16. #16
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    cool...

    hope you're not going to the Walmart dentist though

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    hope you're not going to the Walmart dentist though

    Nope....They have a dentist?????

  18. #18
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    on a trial basis

    they're apparently testing the market. There are other competing dept stores with in-house dentistry practises. Jim

  19. #19
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    Wow....

    I got back from a quick ride around the neighborhood, and I tinkered with the Derailer on the gears....I tightened it up, and it worked like a doozy. The gears changed without wait....No delay. Its so much better now.

    Thanks to whoever posted that....

  20. #20
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    Return It

    I know that sounds harsh but at that price you could have gotten a bike from a LBS (local bike shop.)

    Like someon mentioned the Trek 3700 is right in your ball park.

    What are the perks ????

    A LBS that will probably offer free tune ups.
    Shimano and Bontrager parts vs. whatever is on that bike
    Lifetime warranty on the frame
    The Trek will probably be 15 pounds lighter !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I know this sounds harsh but as far as bang for the buck goes ............. ditch that bike.


    best of luck

    Austin

  21. #21
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    I own 2 blackcombs

    They are great bikes, just not for jumping! I put slime in the tires and would just trailblaze the hell out of the desert, running right over huge rocks, cacti, anything that could fit under the tires. it is great for that because its suspension is so loose. Now the bad part... I would often find jumps and try my luck at it, and I have found that the weak link is the derailer. Twice, upon hard impact of landing, the chain weight forces the derailer arm to extend into the spokes, which causes a broken derailer, bent spokes, rear wheel to lock up immediately, and in my case, a fractured knee. I actually recorded this occuring both times it has happened. the best video of it can be found on youtube- search for "north phoenix mountain bike jump crash" Overall, I am happy with my blackcombs, just be carefull when jumping!

  22. #22
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by whiteowlonfire
    They are great bikes, just not for jumping! I put slime in the tires and would just trailblaze the hell out of the desert, running right over huge rocks, cacti, anything that could fit under the tires. it is great for that because its suspension is so loose. Now the bad part... I would often find jumps and try my luck at it, and I have found that the weak link is the derailer. Twice, upon hard impact of landing, the chain weight forces the derailer arm to extend into the spokes, which causes a broken derailer, bent spokes, rear wheel to lock up immediately, and in my case, a fractured knee. I actually recorded this occuring both times it has happened. the best video of it can be found on youtube- search for "north phoenix mountain bike jump crash" Overall, I am happy with my blackcombs, just be carefull when jumping!
    Last year I bought a Mongoose XR250 for almost $190. The Blackcomb was too expensive so I had to settle. I'm 5'11" and 215lbs. The first time I took it on the trails going on a downhill, the EXACT SAME thing happened to me. My rear derailleur jumped into my rear rim and bent the crap out of my wheel! The geometry and fork is also crap as I always found myself almost endoing every time I got into trouble. At my weight, while riding, my pedals would hit the sides of the singletracks so I had to be more careful. By my third ride, I spun the freewheel! I then endoed by my 5th ride and destroyed my front rim. I upgraded to a K2 Lithium 4.0 within 1 year and it made all the difference.

    The only upside to getting a mongoose was that I had to learn to ride more carefully than my friends. By the time I got my K2, I was already more experienced and therefore rode much faster.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noob@Mongoose
    Hello, I am new here, and I purchased a Mongoose Blackcomb from, what I guess you guys call it, Wally World . Well, I heard from another message board, that its a bad bike, its built really crappy. I got it boxed up, and I assembled it myself.

    Some info about me, first:

    I'm 16, and weigh about 190 pounds. I guess you can say, I am average...I ski in the winter. I am a beginner with mountain biking. I don't want to do anything rough, or hard core. Just go to state parks, and have a ride on the trails there. I also need to burn off some calories, and make my legs stronger so I can ski in the winter, and start to race.

    So with this Mongoose Blackcomb, what do you guys think about it? Do you think I got a good bike for 300 bucks? My dad got it for me, but thats not the point.

    Will I be disappointed with this bike in the long run? I read a few other posts here, and there was someone that got a bike like this one, and it was an entry bike, and people said, if you really get into it, you can always get a better bike. So what do you think?


    Thank you,

    A n()()b on a Mongoose....I know how to ride, don't worry, just don't know what bikes there are....
    Some of the other posters are correct: you can get a much better bike for $2000 than you can for $200. However, if you've never ridden a $2000 bike and you don't plan to do any hard core MTB, you'll likely never notice the difference. And you should totally disregard all the fear-mongering. There's more than enough of that on TV these days? Realize that a lot of folks on these forums work in the industry, and have a vested interested in parting you from your money.

    Until recently, my son rode a Mongoose DXR-AL for the last few years. It's a $100 full suspension kid's bike (24" wheels). While I don't consider it a quality bike, it was certainly capable. Even though it was a cheap kid's bike, I've ridden it down stairs and through the woods and stuff. The brakes are kind of squishy, but they work. The derailleurs are all Shimano, albeit low end, but they always shifted crisply, and were easy to keep in tune. My biggest complaint about the bike was that it was on the heavy side, compared to my bikes. But I was always impressed with what we were able to get for $100.

    When my son finally outgrew it, I sold it for $50. It served us well for a few years, and returned 50% of my cost. Not a bad deal any way you look at it.

    I know you came here for advice about your bike. But you need to realize that some of the respondent live on their MTB's. They spend their spare time researching and studying nuts and bolts that cost more than you entire bike! They know their stuff. If you were looking to become a racing fanatic or something similar, I'd tell you to wisely heed their advice.

    But for your purpose, here's some alternative advice: Ignore the advice! Ride the bike for all it's worth. When you gain enough experience (depending how hard you push it), you'll realize on your own what the bike is lacking, and what you're willing to spend your money on to improve. Or you might just be happy with what you've got.

    Note: You're free to ignore my advice as well. Good luck with your riding!

  25. #25
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    But realistically, 46 lbs is a lot. I mean A LOT. I think if you have a chance to return it and get something lighter you would enjoy your rides better. A hardtail bike is all you need, A 300 bike from any shop will get something perfect (if not overkill) for your average paved and easy trails. Going up hill on something that heavy will kill your enjoyment.

    If you can't find a trek dealer in your area, look for a specialized Hardrock. It's a really decent bike for the money. Of course there are many other brands.

    As for the derailleur and wheels, two of my friends had a your bike, one bent his rim doing a small bunny hop, the other just couldn't take the effort of pedaling that thing. (the last one quit, the other got a Kona Kikapu and loved it, BUT, that way over your price range).

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