Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 74
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10

    I got a Mongoose Blackcomb

    Hello, I am new here, and I purchased a Mongoose Blackcomb from, what I guess you guys call it, Wally World . Well, I heard from another message board, that its a bad bike, its built really crappy. I got it boxed up, and I assembled it myself.

    Some info about me, first:

    I'm 16, and weigh about 190 pounds. I guess you can say, I am average...I ski in the winter. I am a beginner with mountain biking. I don't want to do anything rough, or hard core. Just go to state parks, and have a ride on the trails there. I also need to burn off some calories, and make my legs stronger so I can ski in the winter, and start to race.

    So with this Mongoose Blackcomb, what do you guys think about it? Do you think I got a good bike for 300 bucks? My dad got it for me, but thats not the point.

    Will I be disappointed with this bike in the long run? I read a few other posts here, and there was someone that got a bike like this one, and it was an entry bike, and people said, if you really get into it, you can always get a better bike. So what do you think?


    Thank you,

    A n()()b on a Mongoose....I know how to ride, don't worry, just don't know what bikes there are....

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: alexandros's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    193
    As long as it enables you to go out riding and enjoy the trails don't see how it could be a dissapointment.

    If for any reason your experience after riding it for a while is that it is lacking in this or that area you can then focus your energies on saving for an upgrade for a part or some point in the future a different bike.

    For the time being just check it out, see how it feels, see what you like.
    Not much for a man to ask I dare say.. the simple maturity to ensure a limitless supply of clean socks.

  3. #3
    banned
    Reputation: 29Colossus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    4,150
    You will be disappointed with it in the future. It is not a quality machine. I call bikes like that, Walgooses.

    I'm sorry, but that is the truth as I see it. Have fun on it if you can. Some say that is all that matters. I disagree... but wadda ya do?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by 29Colossus
    You will be disappointed with it in the future. It is not a quality machine. I call bikes like that, Walgooses.

    I'm sorry, but that is the truth as I see it. Have fun on it if you can. Some say that is all that matters. I disagree... but wadda ya do?

    Well, like I said, I am not a hardcore rider....Just going off the paved path once in a while....

  5. #5
    banned
    Reputation: 29Colossus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    4,150
    I thought to myself: "Come on 29C you scrooge! Why don't you check it out just to make sure your words were warranted... give the new guy a break..."

    That is when I looked at the bike... OMG... It is a disaster waiting to happen. It isn't going to be giving you a break either at 46 ever-lovin, body scrubin, super-smashing pounds.



    46

    I'm sure you can find some fun on it though... 46lbs.... I know what direction I would want to be going, and that is down, but going down on it would scare me. I guess just make sure everything is tight and point it.


  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10
    I tried my bike out, but it had a few flaws....The gears were flawed.

    The gear indicator said it was on gear 7, but on the gear itself, it looked as if, it was on gear 8. When I gear down, as I was pedaling, the it jerked the pedals....making my foot fly off.

    Are there any quick fixes for this? Other than those problems, the bike is a charm.

  7. #7
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,371

    here's some help

    read the sticky post at the top of this forum about beginners and Dept. Store bikes; note Mongoose is mentioned. That will give you a clear idea of what your bike will/won't do for you.

    Unfortunately, it will perform for you as well as a $100 pair of skis and boots from the same store.

    hopefully you will be able to have some fun, but keep an eye on bolts and nuts and check if often to make sure it's safe to ride.

    Jim

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10
    I don't think I have EVER seen Walmart carry Skis or boots...

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    53
    My brother has one of those bikes.. he got it 3 or so years ago. If your purpose is to get in shape/keep in shape for the winter this bike will certainly do that. Its like dragging a concrete block behind you.

    But like others have said, if it suits your needs it'll be fine. You said your not hardcore into the hobby so the bike will suit you well as an introduction to the sport. IN a year if you decide you really enjoy the sport you can focus on purchasing a new bike. I would not under any circumstance upgrade a component to this bike.. its best to run it into the ground while saving up to purchase a better bike such as a specialized rock hopper or similar.

    Make sure you only take this guy on easy terrain as well. My brother recently destroyed his going off a jump he made in the back yard.. granted he didnt know what he was doing and that contributed to the destruction of the bike but it isnt built to take too much of a beating.

    Enjoy it and have fun. Your dad bought it for you so it didnt hurt your pocket. Its only a bad bike relative to what most people on this forum are used to.

  10. #10
    Flying Goat
    Reputation: mrpercussive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    11,326
    can you say accident waiting to happen??? for 300 there are much better deals around...

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bubbles & Me's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    48
    I have ben riding a mongoose x200 dual suspension bike for the last year.
    Not to make you feel bad but got it for only 120 bucks it was a floor model closeout or somthing so it was even already put togather.
    I managed to ride it 5 or 6 days a week before work and on days off with my dog for exercise for both of us

    Yes it was (may it rest in peace) a piece of crap.

    The good news is I will always have a fond memory of that old piece of crap. We were on so many adventures and saw so many interesting things togather like wildlife and natural stuff. or the mishaps we had like the time my dog spotted a rabbit and darted right in front of the bike I hit the front brake so hard I went flying over the handle bars.
    That old bike don't owe me a thing.

    More bad news though in shopping for a new bike recently I spotted 2 I really liked for under $300 one was a boulder aluminum frame the SE I think they call it.
    The other a trek 3900
    Is it to late to take it back and get one of these? I think Walmart has a deecent return policy.

    If not hopefully you can make memorys with your yours like I did with mine and one day when your riding a better bike fondly recall that old piece of crap you use to have and all the things you did on it.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    64
    I think that JimC. made a good point. In skiing just like bicycling performance and cost are positively correlated. I know that Walmart doesn't sell ski equipment (not yet) but imagine what level of quality you could buy if Walmart did. It sounds like skiing is your primary sport so hopefuly this analogy will put things in perspective for you (assuming you don't use generic skis, etc.) As for your goal of using biking to crosstrain I doubt you will be able to acomplish much with a department store bike. In order to benifit from ridding you'll need to ride for exdended periods of time which may be intolerable on a "one size fits all bike" and secondly, you'll need to ride on challenging terrain (i.e. uphills/downhills, trails) that a department store bike is not designed for. Therefore, for comfort and safety reasons I don't think that a "Walgoose" will meet your need to crosstrain for skiing; your bike will limit your perfromance because that is not its intended use. That being said, any bike can provide fun if you understand the limits of its utility.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Wyoman
    I think that JimC. made a good point. In skiing just like bicycling performance and cost are positively correlated. I know that Walmart doesn't sell ski equipment (not yet) but imagine what level of quality you could buy if Walmart did. It sounds like skiing is your primary sport so hopefuly this analogy will put things in perspective for you (assuming you don't use generic skis, etc.) As for your goal of using biking to crosstrain I doubt you will be able to acomplish much with a department store bike. In order to benifit from ridding you'll need to ride for exdended periods of time which may be intolerable on a "one size fits all bike" and secondly, you'll need to ride on challenging terrain (i.e. uphills/downhills, trails) that a department store bike is not designed for. Therefore, for comfort and safety reasons I don't think that a "Walgoose" will meet your need to crosstrain for skiing; your bike will limit your perfromance because that is not its intended use. That being said, any bike can provide fun if you understand the limits of its utility.

    Yeah, I understand. Once again, I am not going off cliffs, and I will use it just for exercise. I will make sure I know the limits of this bike. Yeah, I have Atomic Skis from a few years back. Getting a new pair before next winter. Probably another pair of Atomics.....


    But does anyone know what I can do to fix my bike without paying 100 bucks? I mean, my dad knows his way around a bike. He fixed many bikes in his life. Hes an engineer so I think he can handle fixing gears....

  14. #14
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,371

    here's more help

    from your post I think (but could be wrong) that your rear dérailleur is in need of adjustment. here's some reading & pics for you so you can try to adjust it yourself.

    here: http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html

    Secondly there's a barrel adjuster on the cable at the handlebars for fine tuning, check Sheldon's site for how that works too.

    It's confusing at first but if you get in a mess, any good LBS will sort it our for you for not a lot of loot, probably $10-$25. lean over the mechanic's shoulder and watch how he does it...you may have to do it yourself out on a trail.

    good luck, Jim


  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10
    Alright....Thanks a lot! That hopefully will help....I have to go to the dentist, but after I will try to fix it..

  16. #16
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,371

    cool...

    hope you're not going to the Walmart dentist though

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    hope you're not going to the Walmart dentist though

    Nope....They have a dentist?????

  18. #18
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,371

    on a trial basis

    they're apparently testing the market. There are other competing dept stores with in-house dentistry practises. Jim

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10
    Wow....

    I got back from a quick ride around the neighborhood, and I tinkered with the Derailer on the gears....I tightened it up, and it worked like a doozy. The gears changed without wait....No delay. Its so much better now.

    Thanks to whoever posted that....

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    70

    Return It

    I know that sounds harsh but at that price you could have gotten a bike from a LBS (local bike shop.)

    Like someon mentioned the Trek 3700 is right in your ball park.

    What are the perks ????

    A LBS that will probably offer free tune ups.
    Shimano and Bontrager parts vs. whatever is on that bike
    Lifetime warranty on the frame
    The Trek will probably be 15 pounds lighter !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I know this sounds harsh but as far as bang for the buck goes ............. ditch that bike.


    best of luck

    Austin

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4

    I own 2 blackcombs

    They are great bikes, just not for jumping! I put slime in the tires and would just trailblaze the hell out of the desert, running right over huge rocks, cacti, anything that could fit under the tires. it is great for that because its suspension is so loose. Now the bad part... I would often find jumps and try my luck at it, and I have found that the weak link is the derailer. Twice, upon hard impact of landing, the chain weight forces the derailer arm to extend into the spokes, which causes a broken derailer, bent spokes, rear wheel to lock up immediately, and in my case, a fractured knee. I actually recorded this occuring both times it has happened. the best video of it can be found on youtube- search for "north phoenix mountain bike jump crash" Overall, I am happy with my blackcombs, just be carefull when jumping!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by whiteowlonfire
    They are great bikes, just not for jumping! I put slime in the tires and would just trailblaze the hell out of the desert, running right over huge rocks, cacti, anything that could fit under the tires. it is great for that because its suspension is so loose. Now the bad part... I would often find jumps and try my luck at it, and I have found that the weak link is the derailer. Twice, upon hard impact of landing, the chain weight forces the derailer arm to extend into the spokes, which causes a broken derailer, bent spokes, rear wheel to lock up immediately, and in my case, a fractured knee. I actually recorded this occuring both times it has happened. the best video of it can be found on youtube- search for "north phoenix mountain bike jump crash" Overall, I am happy with my blackcombs, just be carefull when jumping!
    Last year I bought a Mongoose XR250 for almost $190. The Blackcomb was too expensive so I had to settle. I'm 5'11" and 215lbs. The first time I took it on the trails going on a downhill, the EXACT SAME thing happened to me. My rear derailleur jumped into my rear rim and bent the crap out of my wheel! The geometry and fork is also crap as I always found myself almost endoing every time I got into trouble. At my weight, while riding, my pedals would hit the sides of the singletracks so I had to be more careful. By my third ride, I spun the freewheel! I then endoed by my 5th ride and destroyed my front rim. I upgraded to a K2 Lithium 4.0 within 1 year and it made all the difference.

    The only upside to getting a mongoose was that I had to learn to ride more carefully than my friends. By the time I got my K2, I was already more experienced and therefore rode much faster.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,062
    Quote Originally Posted by Noob@Mongoose
    Hello, I am new here, and I purchased a Mongoose Blackcomb from, what I guess you guys call it, Wally World . Well, I heard from another message board, that its a bad bike, its built really crappy. I got it boxed up, and I assembled it myself.

    Some info about me, first:

    I'm 16, and weigh about 190 pounds. I guess you can say, I am average...I ski in the winter. I am a beginner with mountain biking. I don't want to do anything rough, or hard core. Just go to state parks, and have a ride on the trails there. I also need to burn off some calories, and make my legs stronger so I can ski in the winter, and start to race.

    So with this Mongoose Blackcomb, what do you guys think about it? Do you think I got a good bike for 300 bucks? My dad got it for me, but thats not the point.

    Will I be disappointed with this bike in the long run? I read a few other posts here, and there was someone that got a bike like this one, and it was an entry bike, and people said, if you really get into it, you can always get a better bike. So what do you think?


    Thank you,

    A n()()b on a Mongoose....I know how to ride, don't worry, just don't know what bikes there are....
    Some of the other posters are correct: you can get a much better bike for $2000 than you can for $200. However, if you've never ridden a $2000 bike and you don't plan to do any hard core MTB, you'll likely never notice the difference. And you should totally disregard all the fear-mongering. There's more than enough of that on TV these days? Realize that a lot of folks on these forums work in the industry, and have a vested interested in parting you from your money.

    Until recently, my son rode a Mongoose DXR-AL for the last few years. It's a $100 full suspension kid's bike (24" wheels). While I don't consider it a quality bike, it was certainly capable. Even though it was a cheap kid's bike, I've ridden it down stairs and through the woods and stuff. The brakes are kind of squishy, but they work. The derailleurs are all Shimano, albeit low end, but they always shifted crisply, and were easy to keep in tune. My biggest complaint about the bike was that it was on the heavy side, compared to my bikes. But I was always impressed with what we were able to get for $100.

    When my son finally outgrew it, I sold it for $50. It served us well for a few years, and returned 50% of my cost. Not a bad deal any way you look at it.

    I know you came here for advice about your bike. But you need to realize that some of the respondent live on their MTB's. They spend their spare time researching and studying nuts and bolts that cost more than you entire bike! They know their stuff. If you were looking to become a racing fanatic or something similar, I'd tell you to wisely heed their advice.

    But for your purpose, here's some alternative advice: Ignore the advice! Ride the bike for all it's worth. When you gain enough experience (depending how hard you push it), you'll realize on your own what the bike is lacking, and what you're willing to spend your money on to improve. Or you might just be happy with what you've got.

    Note: You're free to ignore my advice as well. Good luck with your riding!

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    90
    But realistically, 46 lbs is a lot. I mean A LOT. I think if you have a chance to return it and get something lighter you would enjoy your rides better. A hardtail bike is all you need, A 300 bike from any shop will get something perfect (if not overkill) for your average paved and easy trails. Going up hill on something that heavy will kill your enjoyment.

    If you can't find a trek dealer in your area, look for a specialized Hardrock. It's a really decent bike for the money. Of course there are many other brands.

    As for the derailleur and wheels, two of my friends had a your bike, one bent his rim doing a small bunny hop, the other just couldn't take the effort of pedaling that thing. (the last one quit, the other got a Kona Kikapu and loved it, BUT, that way over your price range).

  26. #26
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,371

    Was it the 2004 model?

    if so, then I disagree with your statement re: fear mongering. You get what you pay for, and a $99 bike that's FS simply isn't a sound buying decision for any off road use.

    Jim

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    April 2, 2004
    Release # 04-113 Firm’s Hotline: (877) 564-2261
    CPSC Consumer Hotline: (800) 638-2772
    CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908



    CPSC, Pacific Cycle Inc. Announce Recall of Mongoose 20-Inch Mountain Bicycles
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission announces the following recall in voluntary cooperation with the firm below. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed.

    Name of product: Mongoose aluminum 20-inch-wheel “D-XR AL” mountain bicycles

    Units: About 14,000

    Manufacturer/Importer: Pacific Cycle Inc., of Madison, Wis.

    Hazard: The rear shock absorber allows the aluminum, dual-suspension frame to flex severely, causing the frame to become unstable and break, posing the risk of injury to riders.

    Incidents/Injuries: Pacific Cycle Inc. has received two reports of the frames on these bicycles breaking, resulting in abrasions and bruises to the rider.

    Description: These are Mongoose aluminum 20-inch-wheel, D-XR AL, dual-suspension mountain bicycles. They have model number “R1590WMET” written on the service sticker, located on the bottom bracket tube near the pedals. The bicycles are silver and red colored. “Mongoose” and “DXR AL” are on the frame of the bicycles. Only Mongoose 20-inch D-XR bicycles with aluminum frames are included this recall. Bicycles with steel frames are not included.

    Sold at: Bicycle stores and department stores nationwide from September 2003 through March 1, 2004 for about $99.

    Manufactured in: China

    Remedy: Consumers should stop using these bicycles immediately and call Pacific Cycle Inc. to receive a free replacement rear shock and instructions.

    Consumer Contact: For more information, call Pacific Cycle Inc. toll-free at (877) 564-2261 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or visit the firm’s Web site at www.mongoose.com

  27. #27
    A little south of sanity
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    116
    Look, we all know that any Ferrari is better than a Honda Civic.... If he is just gettng into the sport, he is 16 years old, and his dad bought him the bike I think everyone has hounded him enough on how much the bike sucks. Let him ride, encourage him to ride, he knows the bike has weaknesses and we all know that as someone gets into the sport they upgrade to better bikes, and love it even more. I don't think its about what you ride, ride it, enjoy it and once you can upgrade, enjoy it even more. That's my 2 cents for whatever there worth.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    65
    lmao...look here trek has a recall too. http://bikeline.com/page.cfm?PageID=208
    better not buy a trek.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,062
    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    Name of product: Mongoose aluminum 20-inch-wheel “D-XR AL” mountain bicycles

    Units: About 14,000

    Incidents/Injuries: Pacific Cycle Inc. has received two reports of the frames on these bicycles breaking, resulting in abrasions and bruises to the rider.

    Description: These are Mongoose aluminum 20-inch-wheel, D-XR AL, dual-suspension mountain bicycles.

    Only Mongoose 20-inch D-XR bicycles with aluminum frames are included this recall. Bicycles with steel frames are not included.
    LOL! If you buy the 20" wheeled model (for young kids; pre-teen), you'll have a 2in 14,000 chance of getting bruises and abrasions. Oh, the horror! I get bruises and abrasions on almost every ride, and my bike hasn't been recalled!

    Beware - even accurate info can be misleading and useless.

  30. #30
    Never trust a fart
    Reputation: frdfandc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,049
    I think the jest of the post by those who DO NOT own a department store bike, just want to let those that DO own a department store bike of what the possible consequences might be.

    Besides, when I see a label like the one Jim C posted above, I'm going to be kinda leery about using it for something it wasn't designed for.

    Kind of like taking a Honda Civic to a Race with Ferrari's. Yes, you might race, but something bad might happen.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    65
    here's a cannondale recall http://www.singletracks.com/blog/?p=650

    go out and ride your bike.I have found plenty of videos on bike repair on the net.it's all pretty easy once you understand how it works.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    65
    here's one for specialized http://www.jeffersonmstovall.com/mtb...alls-stem.html


    another cannondale http://www.pritzkerlaw.com/cannondal...n-bike-recall/


    scroll down and look at the prices,lol for 5k my fork seperates?sweet bike,eh?

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,062
    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    I think the jest of the post by those who DO NOT own a department store bike, just want to let those that DO own a department store bike of what the possible consequences might be.
    Maybe, but these parts made me think he was speaking of a specific make, model, and year that the OP has not even inquired about:

    -- "Was it the 2004 model?"
    -- "You get what you pay for, and a $99 bike that's FS simply isn't a sound buying decision for any off road use."
    -- "Name of product: Mongoose aluminum 20-inch-wheel “D-XR AL” mountain bicycles
    Units: About 14,000"

    To the OP: If you're really just looking to get some on-road exercise, with mild off-road use, here's some good advice: Don't worry about the weight - you'll get more exercise that way. Learn how to adjust the brakes and derailleurs for smooth operation. That will all the difference in riding performance. And be careful if you go off-road. Don't bang it around too much. Absorb the shock with your arms and legs. The suspension should take some stress off the frame as well. I don't see any reason why you shouldn't get a lot of enjoyment out of it.

  34. #34
    mbtr member
    Reputation: scottzg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    3,793
    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    . And you should totally disregard all the fear-mongering. There's more than enough of that on TV these days? Realize that a lot of folks on these forums work in the industry, and have a vested interested in parting you from your money.
    these people are in the industry; they're gonna tell you your bike is of questionable quality not because IT IS, but for the off chance you live in their town and are gonna replace it at their shop, or choose their brand out of the hundreds of bike brands.

    That's absurd, stop the paranoia mongering.
    I like cheap stuff that works great and is very sturdy.

  35. #35
    Ride the dream
    Reputation: EnglishT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,381
    Sorry to say it, but the majority of people here are right - theyre just struggling to say it in a way that doesnt upset people (unfortunately, its not easy to say it nicely).


    The bike is not a good one at all.

    Im sorry, but theres really no other way to put it.


    Just to correct a few misinformations in this thread though.

    1) Weight DOES matter
    Several posters have implied that it being a really overheavy bike isnt a problem if you dont know better. The truth of the matter is that whether or not youve tried lighter bikes, it will still feel heavy and be much less fun to ride than something lighter would have been - result: ridden less, less exersize, less gain, less fun.
    Another small thing about cheap bikes and weight - alot of people (who dont know better) will assume that the extra weight is simply because less is spent on design, so more weight is added to increase strength and/or stiffness - the truth is that this extra weight doesnt make them stronger or stiffer than a lot of (even some comparably priced) bikes, because they are poorly designed they will not only be heavy but usually so flexy that they simply cannot instill in confidence. Result: Flex + weight = no confidence + no fun = ridden less
    (Note: You dont need to be an expert for these principles to apply - a relative beginner might not know about these things, but they will still affect his ride, and subconciously kill his buzz).


    2) Yes, as in all industries, sometimes things go wrong in quality control.
    The problem is, that people are taking it that this means quality control is on a par with these better bikes/parts which are also recalled.
    The reason that recalls happen on these higher end products is that quality control is much tighter - similar problems on deptstore bikes or their components wouldnt result in recall quite so readily.
    Plus, ill bet the people that took back those recalled products (the higher end ones), will have gotten considerably better customer service on the issue.



    The problem here isnt that quality control is poor, its that the bikes are NOT made to be ridden off road.
    Read the sticker posted earlier in this thread, your bike will have one too.
    That sticker isnt there purely to prevent anyone from being able to persue a lawsuit when (not if, when - if you ride one of those offroad for any length of time, you are courting disaster) it blows up on them, its to WARN you that riding it offroad regularly isnt a good idea - the reason is that it is NOT DESIGNED to be used offroad.



    Now, to the op, if you enjoy riding it and youre getting some fun out of it, then dont just throw it straight out. Despite it probably being the right thing to do, its not only wasteful but its simply not advice that would be heeded even if I did give it
    The problem is though, that its really not designed to go offroad. You would probably get away with relatively smooth dirt or gravel trails - but when things get rockier and rootier, then youre gonna be exposing your bike to more than it can handle, which is a recipe for disaster (note, this could be failure, or it could be unpredictable responses that you simply cannot control, etc).
    Whatever you do, dont jump it - if you had a REALLY smooth style you might be able to get away with it for a while (though it still wouldnt be a good idea), but as a beginner that would seem unlikely and so I wouldnt advise it at all - jumping would be a fasttrack to a snapped frame and problably some real hurt at the same time (purely because of the poor design, sorry but it has to be said).

    Like you say, if you get into it then you can always get something better at a later date.
    The real problem is, if you cant ride rockier/rootier trails and cant jump, youre limiting how much of the sport you can try before you make that decision and it may affect your decision somewhat.


    I guess really, all you can do is ride it within its limits (as stated, this limits what you can do without risking serious injury), and enjoy that as much as possible.
    If and when you decide you want to take it to the next level, get something better - and never feel afraid to ask for advice on places like this - its better to make an informed decision first, than make the wrong one and get spat at by a bunch of kids that just want to shoot you down for making the wrong decision (which unfortunately here, you pretty much did).

    Make no mistakes though, its not a good bike and isnt safe to ride on anything but smooth and gentle trails.
    Last edited by EnglishT; 11-04-2008 at 03:01 AM.

  36. #36
    Ride the dream
    Reputation: EnglishT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,381
    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    Kind of like taking a Honda Civic to a Race with Ferrari's. Yes, you might race, but something bad might happen.
    Interesting analogy...

    The civic would be heavier and slower than the ferraris... though the civic wouldnt be damaged (or putting you in danger) really, so it doesnt quite make sense.
    You might come last, but its not dangerous (like riding a bike that expressly states it shouldnt be taken offroad, offroad is)

    Though sticking with cars...
    Riding a dept store bike offroad would be like driving a F1 car over speed bumps.
    You might scratch and scrape your way over, but youre probably going to do some damage and if you dont spot it then it could put you in serious danger later.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    65
    Ride it or take it back.That sticker also says don't ride at night,good thing nobody does that.

  38. #38
    Never trust a fart
    Reputation: frdfandc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,049
    I was thinking of more like the Civic is much, much slower, doesn't handle as well, and will impede flow of the race.

    I don't know if you watch NASCAR or road racing, but if someone doesn't keep up a minimum speed, they get black flagged and pulled off the track.

  39. #39
    Ride the dream
    Reputation: EnglishT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,381
    Yea a bit...


    Though, impeding the flow and getting stopped arent quite the same as putting yourself at risk (potential danger and injury) through unsuitable equipment if you ask me

    I know what you meant... but its a different kind of bad, just didnt seem a totally relevant analogy imho.
    Nothing personal ofc

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    109
    Better analogy would be a honda civic and a jeep off roading. One will obviously stand up better than the other, especially on rough terrain.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    236
    he's not even responding anymore lol

    RIDE IT, and when it breaks get a better bike.

    welcome to the sport

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    56
    LOL! If you buy the 20" wheeled model (for young kids; pre-teen), you'll have a 2in 14,000 chance of getting bruises and abrasions. Oh, the horror! I get bruises and abrasions on almost every ride, and my bike hasn't been recalled!

    Beware - even accurate info can be misleading and useless.
    It's not about getting bruises or abrasions. If you are riding a bike aggressively, you can be in situations where an equipment failure would likely cause serious injury or death. Say you hit a pothole flying down hill and the wheel bends- you go flying over the handlebars. Sometimes you will walk away from a crash like that. Sometimes you hit a tree and break your neck.

    Taking a wallmart bike on technical offroad rides is quite simply unsafe. It's not about being a hater or an elitist. The reason you don't ride wallmart bikes offroad is the same reason you don't go rock climbing with a hemp rope from a hardware store.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    236
    Quote Originally Posted by nealric
    It's not about getting bruises or abrasions. If you are riding a bike aggressively, you can be in situations where an equipment failure would likely cause serious injury or death. Say you hit a pothole flying down hill and the wheel bends- you go flying over the handlebars. Sometimes you will walk away from a crash like that. Sometimes you hit a tree and break your neck.

    Taking a wallmart bike on technical offroad rides is quite simply unsafe. It's not about being a hater or an elitist. The reason you don't ride wallmart bikes offroad is the same reason you don't go rock climbing with a hemp rope from a hardware store.
    this is true, and agree with you %100,
    but the original poster stated he will not be doing any hardcore/ downhill or technical offroad rides.

    walmart bike should be fine for what he will be riding. of course it would probably be alot easier and perhaps funner on a stronger bike, but thats for him to decide.

  44. #44
    Blind biker
    Reputation: harry2110's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    296
    I had the mongoose xr-75 and it only lasted 6 weeks before it wasnt even ridable anymore. But this bike did take some abuse( constant 5in curbs and a 30mph wreck that flipped it). The bike is easy to maintain and fun if you dont want to ride 20 miles a day like i did on it.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    110
    Funny thing is your wally world bike is better than what people use on a daily basis for basic transportation in Europe and Asia yet somehow it's not good enough for us
    New 2008 Fuji Outland Pro FS w/ 2008 Forge Sawback 5xx grouppo.

  46. #46
    M_S
    M_S is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,410
    1) They don't use those bikes for mountain biking.

    2) The bikes they use in Europe, at least, are better for daily transportationbecause thye are not designed to look like something they are not.

    3) This thread was finally going to die...

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    432
    First off, not meant to rip the op's decision to buy this bike BUT, there are much better options out there. No need to buy full suspension for the type of riding he is doing, second check into used bikes on Ebay/craigslist. I bought a 2006 Specialized Rockhopper for my teenage son on Ebay for $280, picked it up so no shipping. Decent drivetrain, super strong A1 alum. frame, and still had the nubs on the factory tires, and weighs in at about 31lbs. Retailed new for $550 so I basically got it for half off.

    See if Wally World will take it back, if they will then take your time and buy a decent used bike.

  48. #48
    ht freerider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by Noob@Mongoose
    Nope....They have a dentist?????
    They have a bank, a cost cutters and an eyeglass place...... so a dentist is probably in line

  49. #49
    ht freerider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    34
    i bought this bike on $250 whim and i like it so far, but im used to jumping a trek 3700 20 feet so im kinda a noob but go to this site for more mgooses they r just as good as konas so stop dissin mongoose

    http://www.mongoose.com/usa/eng/mtn/mtn

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    16
    So I'm going to just offer a third option between buying Walmart and buying LBS. Buy a bike from walmart, ride the crap out of it for 30 days, then return it and get your money back. If you like mountain biking go buy and LBS bike, if you don't then Bentonville picked up the tab. As a comic once said, Walmart takes anything back. "These diapers already had sh*t in them" ... "We are really sorry about that sir"

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •