1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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Thread: Hybrid tire?

  1. #1
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    Hybrid tire?

    I was just getting into riding (I was a beginner then so I'd consider myself still a beginner now) a little more than a year ago when I had a pretty bad wreck last April that kept me off the bike for the better part of 4 months and immediately upon recovery I became insanely busy so I haven't had a real chance to get my bike fixed (I replaced what I could but there is some slight bending I'm going to get repaired this Thursday).

    I'm wanting to get back out there but still don't have much time, so since I can't make it to the trails through the week (and even most weekends) I thought I'd do some road riding to get back in shape until the opportunity presented itself. I stopped by the LBS to check out basic road bikes but was turned off by the fact that an average ride ran $1000-1500.

    I don't want to have to buy an extra set of rims to put road tires on and switch them in/out according to conditions so I thought I'd look into some sort of hybrid tire that I could leave on. I'd heard someone talking about them, how they were smooth down the middle section and then knobby on the sides.

    As of right now, because of my schedule, most of my riding will be done on local roads and an occasionall trail when I can break away on a weekend. How well do these tires perform on solid surface (blacktop, pavement, concrete, etc)? I assume it's nowhere near the ease of an actual road bike but does it make a noticable difference? And is the reduced traction still enough to sustain the average singletrack?

  2. #2
    go chase the sunset
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceezer
    I don't want to have to buy an extra set of rims to put road tires on and switch them in/out according to conditions so I thought I'd look into some sort of hybrid tire that I could leave on.
    Uh, why not keep with your current rims and just switch out tires? There are some 26" slicks out there.

  3. #3
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    How difficult is it to switch tires? I've never had to change one yet so I don't know what kind of effort goes into it.

  4. #4
    go chase the sunset
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    Tire levers under the edge, blam, 5 seconds. You'd be mad to get a second pair of rims. Tires are cheap.

  5. #5
    College Boy
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    Last night I let the air out of my tire, removed the tire and tube and put everything back together ad aired it up i I want to say 5 mins max/tire.

    5 mins being my best guess since I took off the tire make it easier to true my wheel up a little. So switching it out is pretty easy with a tire level and after a few times you will get pretty good at it.

  6. #6
    Rod
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    I do the exact same thing you're talking about. I have a pair of kenda tires that are slick down the middle with some knobbies on the sides for conoring. I don't even need tire levers to switch out the tires. They also do good on pavement and hard singletrack. I rode them last week 20+ mph on a downhill singletrack. They're slicker than normal knobby tires, especially in leaves, but I can switch out both tires in less than 10 minutes. Just buy a 2nd pair of tires and switch them out before you head over to the trail. That's what I'm going to do today. If you're only going to ride hard singletrack you could ride semi-slicks, but if you want more traction just switch out the tires and save a lot of cash. Good luck

  7. #7
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    I'm in SC and the singletrack is loose because of sand & pinestraw. So because of this it would probably be in my best interest to have seperate tires for on & off-road instead of trying to find a single tire to handle both?

    Thanks for the help, y'all. Really looking forward to getting back on the saddle.

  8. #8
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    I'd say that it would be worthwhile to get two sets of tires. It's going to be hard to find one single set that covers both road and trails sufficiently. A lot of off-road tires will get worn down quickly with road riding because of different materials and such. My bike came with Kenda Kwicks and they were almost bald in a few months since I road on the rode most often.

    Currently, I only have one bike and I ride road almost exclusively. But, on the weekends when I can go further, I head to nearby county roads that are dirt and gravel. My preferred riding style is really more like cyclocross than mountain biking. I use Geax Evolutions most of the time. They hold up on road really well. They actually make thinner ones you can put on 26" wheels so you have a lot less rolling resistance. I use the fatter ones, though, for the dirt and gravel roads. The Evolutions are basically like slicks with recessed grooves that give it enough bite for the gravel and dirt.

    When I go to trails once in a blue moon, I have WTB Moto Raptors that have a lot more tooth to them. I'm not saying buy those.. just illustrating that I use a second set on trails.

    The more you swap them out, the faster you'll get at changing the tires. Besides, it's a chance to get out and putter with your bike. I like to throw a CD in my garage player while I swap out the tires then generally give everything a once-over before a ride the next day. It's actually a pretty fun and relaxing thing to do.

    Sand and pine straw.. man, I wish we had that here in Arkansas. It's all cobblestones here. Ugh!
    Last edited by ZenZhu; 04-29-2007 at 11:26 PM.

  9. #9
    Still learning
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    You're never going to find a tyre which is good as a slick and also works well offroad. Even something like the Michelin Transworld City is going to be crap on singletrack.

  10. #10
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    Very helpful information, ZenZhu.

    Thank you all for the input.

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