1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
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Thread: Hunter Mountain

  1. #1
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    Hunter Mountain

    Since I have taken the entire summer off until late Sept, I have been eyeballing Hunter Mountain New York. http://youtu.be/KjKkdoefb-0

    This would be indeed my most intense MT bike experience to date, bu tnot sure if my bike will handle it. I see from the vids they are all DH,FS bikes and I have a hardtail Diamondback, or hopefully soon, a Hardtail Stump Jumper comp.

    Am I headed for disaster if I take on Hunter mountain with a hardtail? Even if I just take it easy and not get crazy on jumps? Will the local Mt bikers on FS bikes point and laugh at me on a hard tail?


    Oh.... Guess I am a troll now

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    Even as an absolute newb, I cant see why people would call you a troll.

    First off, what is the exact model of your bike? People will want to know, this is critical info that is omitted.

    Second, There has to be ton of variations in trails at this mountain, have you researched this to see what kind there are?

    Third, why care what people think, if you can't ride, you'll look even dumber on a more expensive bike.

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    honestly i do not think so, i've been down mountains as a youth on a figid frame cheapo bike, like serious mountains in wales. You just need to stand up, when the back wheel hits the ground, or stand when going over really rough terrain, thus you need very strong pedals and cranks.

    I think that is more about how you ride, sure FS would be nice, safe and probably more comfortable. but required, personally i dont think so....


    ... waiting to be heckled

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    It's going to be a challenge, I won't say it's a bad idea but it will really push your ability on a bicycle. The local bikers will be passing you so fast they won't have time to point and laugh, so don't worry about that. The best advice you can get is to rent a DH bike there. If you don't want to do that, then you will have no shortage of trails that will challenge you, probably to the point of not being able to ride things.

    If anyone tells you something can't be rode on a hardtail well point them here:


    Don't get cocky watching that video, you're not that guy. Anywhere you go for lift served biking, you can be pushed beyond your limits. Pad up, rent a bike, and get after it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendosa View Post
    Even as an absolute newb, I cant see why people would call you a troll.
    different thread

    First off, what is the exact model of your bike? People will want to know, this is critical info that is omitted.
    Ok right now it's a Diamondback Response Sport(2006) and yes it's a big box store bike, bu tI'm telling ya, it has held up on some damn hard and techy stuff including constant rock garden pounding...nothing broke yet..I swear.

    Second, There has to be ton of variations in trails at this mountain, have you researched this to see what kind there are?
    From youtube I see downhill and some moderate tech stuff.

    Third, why care what people think, if you can't ride, you'll look even dumber on a more expensive bike.
    Oh I can ride for 36 years old, I feel 18 out there and try to ride accordingly, fast and hard as possible....screw age It's more of a safety thing... wil a hardtail be thrown around like crazy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    It's going to be a challenge, I won't say it's a bad idea but it will really push your ability on a bicycle. The local bikers will be passing you so fast they won't have time to point and laugh, so don't worry about that. The best advice you can get is to rent a DH bike there. If you don't want to do that, then you will have no shortage of trails that will challenge you, probably to the point of not being able to ride things.

    If anyone tells you something can't be rode on a hardtail well point them here:


    Don't get cocky watching that video, you're not that guy. Anywhere you go for lift served biking, you can be pushed beyond your limits. Pad up, rent a bike, and get after it.

    About that rider....wow, that is all.

    I'd be to scared of face planting a tree on the first curv when my front tire loses it.

    Second....where id that place?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ganymede_Illusion View Post
    About that rider....wow, that is all.

    I'd be to scared of face planting a tree on the first curv when my front tire loses it.

    Second....where id that place?
    That's Whistler in British Columbia, Canada. It's basically the mecca for mountain bike riders. I'm not familiar with Hunter mountain, but I would suspect that it's rocky and nasty, get padded up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    That's Whistler in British Columbia, Canada. It's basically the mecca for mountain bike riders. I'm not familiar with Hunter mountain, but I would suspect that it's rocky and nasty, get padded up.


    I also see that they have the seats hunched way down...Makes sense going DH, because it's not like you need full power stroke from your legs and the extra seat clearance gives yo ulower CG and room to avoid "Nut Shock"

    I'll note.... *Seat low*

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ganymede_Illusion View Post

    I'll note.... *Seat low*
    It can not be stressed how important it is to slam that seat down. Actually, if you come up on a technical section of trail even when you're on an XC ride, drop your seat if you're having trouble with it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    It can not be stressed how important it is to slam that seat down. Actually, if you come up on a technical section of trail even when you're on an XC ride, drop your seat if you're having trouble with it.

    Yepp, I tend to ride everywhere with seat in "power stroke" configuration AKA "Roadie style" full out on the leg.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ganymede_Illusion View Post
    Ok right now it's a Diamondback Response Sport(2006) and yes it's a big box store bike, bu tI'm telling ya, it has held up on some damn hard and techy stuff including constant rock garden pounding...nothing broke yet..I swear.
    .
    had that bike, maybe mine was an 08. did on season on it, the frame will hold and the components might, might not either depending on how graceful you are. I would be renting, I wouldnt trust it on DH trails.
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    I trust my bike with quite a lot, but if I'm buying a lift ticket to ride somewhere, I'm going to be renting a DH bike too.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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    OP, you can always rent a FS DH bike if you think you'll need it. fwiw, every lift serviced mtn i've been to, i've always seen one or two people with hard tails.

    that being said, if you decide you're going to go to Hunter, PM me and let me know when. that's only a couple hour drive for me (and i used to go to Hunter with friends for snowboarding) i'd love to come down some weekend to ride and what not.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ganymede_Illusion View Post
    different thread



    Ok right now it's a Diamondback Response Sport(2006) and yes it's a big box store bike, bu tI'm telling ya, it has held up on some damn hard and techy stuff including constant rock garden pounding...nothing broke yet..I swear.



    From youtube I see downhill and some moderate tech stuff.



    Oh I can ride for 36 years old, I feel 18 out there and try to ride accordingly, fast and hard as possible....screw age It's more of a safety thing... wil a hardtail be thrown around like crazy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ganymede_Illusion View Post
    Yepp, I tend to ride everywhere with seat in "power stroke" configuration AKA "Roadie style" full out on the leg.

    Look I'm not trying to insult you, but this makes me wonder. Without actually seeing what you are riding, it is very subjective as to "damn hard and techy stuff including constant rock garden pounding". The reason I say that is that I would doubt just how hard and technical it was if you're riding with your seat post in the power position.

    It's exactly why I have a dropper seat post.

    An example would be when people find out I mountain bike, they start talking to me say they do also. When I ask what trails etc... I find out mountain biking is riding a mountain bike on paved/gravel paths.

    A friend of mine and I rode http://www.snowshoemtn.com/index.htm on cross-country bikes. But they were FS.

    Its a WTF have I done moment in the parking lot watching guys suit up in armor on back then big hit bike of 8-10 inch travel and all we had were gloves, helmet and 4 inch travel with 1.9 tires.

    You have to be honest with yourself, is what you're riding really that hard? When we went the cross-country riding we did including what people are now calling all mountain I guess.

    Good luck if you go and know your limits. Snowshoe is where I pancaked my first rim and my friend broke a rib- and he is a very skilled rider.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Look I'm not trying to insult you, but this makes me wonder. Without actually seeing what you are riding, it is very subjective as to "damn hard and techy stuff including constant rock garden pounding". The reason I say that is that I would doubt just how hard and technical it was if you're riding with your seat post in the power position.
    He's right, there isn't anything where you ride to approximate what you're going to run into doing lift served at hunter. Just be ready to rent a bike and pads and be humble up there.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Look I'm not trying to insult you, but this makes me wonder. Without actually seeing what you are riding, it is very subjective as to "damn hard and techy stuff including constant rock garden pounding". The reason I say that is that I would doubt just how hard and technical it was if you're riding with your seat post in the power position.

    It's exactly why I have a dropper seat post.

    An example would be when people find out I mountain bike, they start talking to me say they do also. When I ask what trails etc... I find out mountain biking is riding a mountain bike on paved/gravel paths.

    A friend of mine and I rode http://www.snowshoemtn.com/index.htm on cross-country bikes. But they were FS.

    Its a WTF have I done moment in the parking lot watching guys suit up in armor on back then big hit bike of 8-10 inch travel and all we had were gloves, helmet and 4 inch travel with 1.9 tires.

    You have to be honest with yourself, is what you're riding really that hard? When we went the cross-country riding we did including what people are now calling all mountain I guess.

    Good luck if you go and know your limits. Snowshoe is where I pancaked my first rim and my friend broke a rib- and he is a very skilled rider.
    I have to agree.

    OP, I have not rode up in your neck of the woods but i have heard Thompson park is pretty easy. most of the trails in Syracuse are not all that challenging, judging off the CNY trails I ride the stuff you are riding is maybe advanced beginner to easier intermediate trails. the most technical riding I can find in CNY is Skytop, if you havent rode anything like this rent a bike. I take my friend back there and he is on my old response. first day he broke the derailer.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I trust my bike with quite a lot, but if I'm buying a lift ticket to ride somewhere, I'm going to be renting a DH bike too.
    So how much does it cost to rent a downhill bike? Not that I'd even attempt to ride that kind of terrain at my skill level, but it does make me curious...

  18. #18
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    most places a decent DH bike is $100 a day +/-
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    If that's the case, it would be a no-brainer to rent a DH bike. Seems like it would be a big risk to ride the bike you have now - what do you do if something drastic happens and you have a catastrophic malfunction going 20 to 30 MPH? That could put you in the hospital. Why risk it? A Walmart bike can only take so much, and a Diamond Back Response can only take so much as well before something fails...a $100 rental investment would go a long way in extending the life of your Response / Stupjumper, and possibly your own life / limb too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by getagrip View Post
    If that's the case, it would be a no-brainer to rent a DH bike. Seems like it would be a big risk to ride the bike you have now - what do you do if something drastic happens and you have a catastrophic malfunction going 20 to 30 MPH? That could put you in the hospital. Why risk it? A Walmart bike can only take so much, and a Diamond Back Response can only take so much as well before something fails...a $100 rental investment would go a long way in extending the life of your Response / Stupjumper, and possibly your own life / limb too.
    One problem with renting goes to the riders skills. Some people can't adapt very quickly to a new bike, so riding a bike that is completely foreign to them could be worse.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    One problem with renting goes to the riders skills. Some people can't adapt very quickly to a new bike, so riding a bike that is completely foreign to them could be worse.
    That is true to a point, but the renter can always ride it around for an hour to get used to it before taking it up the lifts. Personally, I think it would be much smarter to rent a bike that is built for DH riding that you are not used to, rather than riding a bike that is NOT built for that kind of riding and risk injury due to the components failing or breaking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by getagrip View Post
    So how much does it cost to rent a downhill bike? Not that I'd even attempt to ride that kind of terrain at my skill level, but it does make me curious...
    I just looked at white face's rentals yesterday. $130 gets you a full day pass, bike, pads, and a full face helmet for the day.... there are lesser packages depending on what type of riding you want to do. Next trip I take to placid I think I know what I am doing!!
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