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  1. #1
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    Hub/wheel bearing cones, lack of standardization

    What's up with that? Trek 820, about 2008, want to replace pitted cones rather that replace whole wheel, or put in a new hub. Can not find matching cones for the front wheel. Rims are Matrix 550. No brand marking on the hub. Ball bearings are 1/8 inch, axle is 9mm x 1mm, cones are 15mm outer diameter, 12mm long. Wheels mfg cones look similar, but, no 12mm length is offered. Tried bikeparts.com. Been to 5 local shops, no luck.

  2. #2
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    Those bikes seemed to use Bontrager components in the hubs. You might want to search for that with some dimensions from your hub.

    Rather than trying to get cones, it is probably cheaper to buy a complete hub assembly and take it apart for the parts you want. Identifying markings on your current parts might help.

  3. #3
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    If you Google Bontrager hub maintenance, there is a manual for Bontrager hubs.
    Looks like Trek sells a complete axle assy - at least used to.

  4. #4
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    A Trek dealer should have the parts, however, you can also use a shorter cone and an axle spacer.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    A Trek dealer should have the parts, however, you can also use a shorter cone and an axle spacer.
    Will give this a shot.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slash5 View Post
    If you Google Bontrager hub maintenance, there is a manual for Bontrager hubs.
    Looks like Trek sells a complete axle assy - at least used to.
    Checking this... I don't think Bontrager made these hubs, Trek farmed them out, to someone..

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnluke View Post
    Checking this... I don't think Bontrager made these hubs, Trek farmed them out, to someone..
    I saw some posts saying that some of the Bontrager hubs were from Formula.

  8. #8
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    success!

    7th local bike shop, Trek dealer, had the right cones. Hubs aren't branded, look to be generic Chinese made for use on the cheaper Trek bikes. I assume Trek stocked their dealers with these cones for service work. Maybe this will help others in similar situation. Two new cones on left, old one on the right. 9mm x 1mm axle, 1/8th inch ball bearings, 15mm outer dia. , 12mm height.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hub/wheel bearing cones, lack of standardization-trek-820-front-cones-sm.jpg  


  9. #9
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    The less expensive Trek (and other manufacturer) hubs that aren't branded Shimano are, in all likelihood, Formula.

  10. #10
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    I searched for Formula bearings/cones and found nothing matching what I have. If you have a link please share.

  11. #11
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    Clean out your hub and repack it with toothpaste. Ride it for 100 miles or so and then repack the bearing with fresh grease and new bearings. It might not end up perfect but it will smooth out the surfaces. This is an old trick that I have not tried, but supposedly it works. Look it up.

    Otherwise, buy the closest Wheels Mfg kit you can find. The best you can ask for on a cheap, generic no-name hub is that it rolls. Bonus points if it's fairly smooth.

    A Trek 820 is Trek's absolute rock-bottom cheapy bike. It's one half step above a Next Powerclimber. Don't put too much effort into it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Clean out your hub and repack it with toothpaste. Ride it for 100 miles or so and then repack the bearing with fresh grease and new bearings. It might not end up perfect but it will smooth out the surfaces. This is an old trick that I have not tried, but supposedly it works. Look it up.
    I like it. 1 Q, though, wouldn't sand work better than toothpaste?

  13. #13
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    If there aren't any seals in the hubs, fixing them is throwing good money after bad.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
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    It's a low-end bike, heavy, but it has served me well. Just trying to keep it going. New cones installed. Seals too. Should keep out the sand and toothpaste. Not a bad trick on the toothpaste-

  15. #15
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    You might also check the 'dustcap' for a name. I know another brand that is used on many cheaper wheels is Quando. Again, not bad, but not really an off-road hub.
    Last edited by wschruba; 12-25-2012 at 09:47 AM.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by vk45de View Post
    I like it. 1 Q, though, wouldn't sand work better than toothpaste?
    Sand would be way too coarse. The point is to polish the surfaces, not grind them into oblivion.

  17. #17
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    Sorry for the threadjack:

    Attempting to repack Shimano HB-M756 front hub cup'n'cone. I have 13/15/17mm park tools cone wrench. Wrench is too thick to fit the cone, which doesn't make much sense. Any ideas on a cone wrench that should fit?

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