1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    How to Remove Wheel Reflectors?

    Hey guys,

    Just got a new bike and would like to remove the wheel reflectors w/o breaking them. How?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    remove the screw in the back..

    or just break them and put them in the trash. they're useless.

  3. #3
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    I've gotta do this one this weekend also, I was considering using a hammer.

  4. #4
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    Pull them down till they the side of the reflector clear the spokes, and then twist them(like your trying to spin the tire) till they break.

  5. #5
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    Large flathead screwdriver, use something as a backer to the reflector. They twist right off, jut like a screw.

    Just did it 2 weeks ago.

  6. #6
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    Haha...I guess there's no way but to break them, huh? Honestly, I never thought of the look of the reflectors until I coming here. I guess it does make it look rookie-ish (i'm assuming thats the dislike?), but I do kinda think it serves a safety purpose esp. riding at night, no?

  7. #7
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    Ride with lights at night

    one or 2 red blinkers on the back of you (1 on your back, 1 on the bike)

    and one good light up front

    and wear bright clothing. This is much safer and more legal than just regular wheel reflectors

  8. #8
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    Unfortunately reflectors are only good if hit by a light source within a certain angle and then the other person has to be within a certain angle to see them. Depending on the angle, will determine their effectiveness.

    A light is typically a better replacement for a reflector. Wheel reflectors really aren't effective. If concerned with night riding and being seen a brighter shirt will serve you better.

  9. #9
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    I've always thought reflectors were just one more thing to break off your bike while you're riding, littering the trail. Even when I used a screwdriver, they still broke. Get good lights and a day-glo yellow jersey for night riding.

  10. #10
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    Mine were just clip on, you could use a small flat head and pinch the head of the clips and they fall off.

  11. #11
    spec4life???..smh...
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    I just twisted them and put enough pressure on the clips that they popped off. JUst be careful not to twist to hard and bend the spokes.

    On the same topic i was wondering how to get that plastic protecter behind the cass off. Is it just another break off?

  12. #12
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    Thanks guys. Will proceed with the reflector removal and research some lights if night riding comes into play.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by spec4life
    On the same topic i was wondering how to get that plastic protecter behind the cass off. Is it just another break off?
    i was going to take that off when i got my new wheelset but opted not to as i thought i may be there to help keep dirt and such away from the cogs and whatnot. Maybe someone else can shine some light on that though..
    '01 C'dale SuperV500

  14. #14
    spec4life???..smh...
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    Its actually there just to prevent the chain from falling off the big ring and damaging the wheels. Useless iff the derailer limiter is adjusted properly.

    Everytime i look at it i think that needs to come off but im just not sure the best way.

  15. #15
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    taking the cassette off would be the easiest way then if you really wanted to do it
    '01 C'dale SuperV500

  16. #16
    spec4life???..smh...
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    yeah id thought about that but it seems like alot of trouble just to get something off that really isnt causeing any damage exept for the looks, which is the reason its still on my bike.

    Thanks for the suggestion though...

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudy1337
    Unfortunately reflectors are only good if hit by a light source within a certain angle and then the other person has to be within a certain angle to see them. Depending on the angle, will determine their effectiveness.

    A light is typically a better replacement for a reflector. Wheel reflectors really aren't effective. If concerned with night riding and being seen a brighter shirt will serve you better.
    From the side I think they are very effective. I would not use them in place of a light, but I find that when driving, the wheel reflectors are often far more noticable from the side than head/tail lights of bikes I see riding at night.

    That said, I would never keep then on a trail bike.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arrwin
    Haha...I guess there's no way but to break them, huh? Honestly, I never thought of the look of the reflectors until I coming here. I guess it does make it look rookie-ish (i'm assuming thats the dislike?), but I do kinda think it serves a safety purpose esp. riding at night, no?
    Actually they are a security hazard anywhere but on the road, they can twist and get caught in the fork, or chainstays and they can snag branches like no other.

    Take one end in each hand and just break them right off.

  19. #19
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    Why would anyone wanna take off there reflectors. Taking them off could throw off the entire balance of the bike.

  20. #20
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    be aware that if you get hit by a car you may get less compensation if you don't have reflectors. there've been cases where this has been used against the cyclist in court.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qatarbhoy
    be aware that if you get hit by a car you may get less compensation if you don't have reflectors. there've been cases where this has been used against the cyclist in court.
    Good point. Better yet, you may avoid being in court to start with.

  22. #22
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    I would take mine off, but then my 3 year old would want to be like his dad and take his off too. Sometimes, you just have to look a little rookie-ish for the safety of your kids. And yes for all the future questions I see coming up, he does have a flashing red light on the back of his bike, and hardly ever rides at night unless I am walking next to him and it's on the sidewalk to there is no need for a headlight.

  23. #23
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    never even thought about pulling the reflectors off before this post

  24. #24
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    Balance

    I've actually found that my wheel reflectors help me to static balance my rims/tires. If I take them off, the valve stem portion of the rim is noticeably heavier. The addition of the reflector keeps the rims balanced on my bike.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by madmagrider
    The addition of the reflector keeps the rims balanced on my bike.
    I use chewing gum.

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