1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    OMG!
    Reputation: adjunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    415

    How much would you spend on an entry level bike?

    Im doing research for a project. Your opinion would be very much appreciated!

    What things are important to you in a first bike?

    How much are you willing to spend?

    As you browse through your options, what do you see that you like? What do you find that you want but isn't being offered?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,011
    It all depends on a few things most important I think it's a tie between budget and what level is the current interest;sport or hobby. Then, friends and families influence if any. What kind of physical condition, what's the goal. What kind of skills, trails, etc.

    First thing first, budget is important not many people would jump in and spend $3000-4000 on their first bike but if they have friends and families who ride and currently play another sport or hobby at avid or enthusiast level, they may understand the perks of getting better models and willing to spend more for the first bike.

    Safe to say good entry level HT would be $600-750
    Entry level FS $1350-1600.

    Experienced riders may look for

    Bike fit
    Intended use
    Performance
    Bling
    Reliability/durability
    Price /value

    Most first time buyers look for almost the opposite. I don't know if that answer your survey questions.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bataivah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    652
    For me, I would look the the bike with the best forks for an entry level bike. And it's not easy to find good forks in that price range of a bike, but a lock-out on them is nice to have.

  4. #4
    Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!
    Reputation: GelatiCruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,011

    Re: How much would you spend on an entry level bike?

    Budget first and foremost. I want a bike that fits me well and is durable. Reusability is pretty key as well. I want a nice frame that I can use/upgrade for the future. Some people want nice parts they can bring to a new frame. For me, it's a durable frame that I can upgrade over time.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,065
    14500/weight of bike in Kg for HT, 30000/weight of bike in Kg for FS.

  6. #6
    I like pie.
    Reputation: Mr5150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    449
    I spent $360 for my first Mtn bike. But that was in 1992.

    Today, I'd recommend as much as you dare-at least $700 for a HT or $1200 for a FS.

    As to that first mtn bike of mine...I out grew it (skill wise) in six months and bought my second bike for $800

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    116
    I say $1000 top for something that would be worth while keeping/riding, get something along the line of Shimano Deore drivetrain, Rockshox Recon fork

    Like others have said, a good fork really make your bike shines on the trails

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: borabora's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    481
    About $5 per hour riding for the first full year. But no less than $500 and no more than $4000. Problem being that most beginners won't know how much or how little they will end up riding.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    283
    Read up on the subject and instruct yourself. Then you can make an educated guess on what will work for you on particular trails. Budget is a big thing of course and buying a bike that can do most things fairly well is best. Once you know what you really like, then you can customize said bike or purchase another that will suit you fully. Most harcore riders end up with more than 1 bike and some end up with far too many...lol.

  10. #10
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,820
    Since you've asked, this is my $0.02. It's neither right, nor wrong, it's just my opinion.

    The entry level bike serves a valuable purpose for the great majority of riders, especially those that don't have tons of disposable income. If you have tons of disposable income, get whatever you want, in several different colors if that's what floats your boat.

    For the rest of us with budgetary constraints, buying and learning on an entry level bike is a prudent, and fiscally sensible way to dabble in the sport, see if you are up to the challenge and even like it after all, and to figure out what niche fits you best, so when the time comes to get a bike that will allow to do the type of riding that you have proven to yourself to favor, you SHOULD know a LOT more about what bike would suit you better, and many rookie mistakes will already be in your rear view mirror (having learned those lessons with a bike that didn't cost more than was appropriate for the purpose it served).

    Many people buy a bike thinking that it would be fun to ride like the guys in the Mountain Dew commercial, but once the reality sets in that it can be a lot of hard work to ride like that, or they can't tolerate the risk of injury, or for whatever reason, discover that they don't really like riding a mountain bike. Buying an entry level bike minimizes the risk of investing heavily into an activity that they will soon abandon, and then have to sell their equipment at a substantial loss. Happens a LOT.

    Also, many riders think they know what type of bike they will like or work best for them, but they really are relatively blind until they have ridden for a while, so investing heavily in a bike that really misses the mark for them, puts them that much further away from getting the bike that truly would serve them best.

    In spite of the fact that more expensive bikes do perform better, an entry level bike is generally going to be plenty capable relative to the actual skill level of a beginning rider.

    If buying new, $500 will get you out onto the dirt to see if this is something you want to continue to do. I could see beginning riders spending up to maybe $1,200 on a bike if they have the budget. The standard XC hardtail is a great choice for most riders. If you insist on going straight to free riding, dirt jumping, or downhilling, that's your prerogative, but I would advise you to make sure you have plenty of budget to get good safety equipment and to replace what you break, and to have good medical insurance.

    Like I stated at the beginning, if you have money to burn, then go ahead and get something better. Just know that the entry level bike is a wise investment, and for those with budgetary constraints, will get you onto the right bike sooner, and cheaper than over spending on a bike when you don't know what you think you know.

  11. #11
    Resident Gear Head
    Reputation: provin1327's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    378
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    For the rest of us with budgetary constraints, buying and learning on an entry level bike is a prudent, and fiscally sensible way to dabble in the sport, see if you are up to the challenge and even like it after all, and to figure out what niche fits you best, so when the time comes to get a bike that will allow to do the type of riding that you have proven to yourself to favor, you SHOULD know a LOT more about what bike would suit you better, and many rookie mistakes will already be in your rear view mirror (having learned those lessons with a bike that didn't cost more than was appropriate for the purpose it served).
    This. I bought a $100 bike on craigslist, realized I like the sport, found out the flaws with that bike and my body (size and riding style) then spent the $ on a better, but still entry level bike. You don't want a $2,000 garage ornament
    2 Hands Working Do More Than 1000 Hands Praying

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Shakester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    964
    Speaking from personal experience as well as from a few people I know. If its something you're really interested in and you're planning to stick with it, then I'd spend a little more money now to save you some later. A really good first bike can last you a few years without you feeling the need to upgrade. A true beginner, first bike could last you a few months to a year as you get better and more into, then you'd want a better one. There's no way around the whole "wanting a better" one stage. There is probably someone on this forum with a $4000 bike that wants a $6000 one. But, I've never learned my lesson....

    The most I've spent for a first bike is $300 which was a Marin Bobcat Trail in the 90s. After a long hiatus and getting back into it, I spent $400 on an old Giant XTC.

Similar Threads

  1. entry level new bike
    By smokeasplif in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-28-2013, 09:23 PM
  2. Entry level fat bike
    By Rick007 in forum Fat Bikes
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-07-2013, 08:21 AM
  3. Entry level bike
    By JerB in forum GT
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-18-2012, 06:17 PM
  4. looking for a entry level bike.
    By FireLikeIYA in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 04-26-2012, 08:10 PM
  5. Entry Level Bike
    By Sean831 in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-26-2011, 08:44 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •