1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    22

    How much should i offer for these Bontrager Rims?

    i found an extra set of bontrager rims and tires for my Trek 3700 2007 model. it even has the cassette on the rear tire already. Rim is AT550, 26 inch.

    Will this work on the 2007 Trek 3700...? How much should i offer for them since the seller wants $100 total for them? The AT 550 rims are coming off of a 2010 Trek 820.

  2. #2
    I hate that name.
    Reputation: blunderbuss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,452
    Just make sure the number of cogs on the freewheel (it's not a cassette) matches yours. If the wheels are true and the tires and fw aren't overly worn, I'd say $100 is an ok price. If you can get under that, take it. If the tires look really bad, offer $50 or $60. That setup- wheels, tires, tubes, fw- would run $200 new in the shop. If the freewheel is worn out and your chain isn't, expect to pay $20-$25 for a new one. Unfortunately, there's no way to really know until you try riding them. Also be aware that this isn't an upgrade, these wheels are basically the same ones that came stock on your bike.
    Worked at Trek/Fisher dealer 2008-2013. Only a little biased.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    765
    Quote Originally Posted by blunderbuss View Post
    Just make sure the number of cogs on the freewheel (it's not a cassette) matches yours. If the wheels are true and the tires and fw aren't overly worn, I'd say $100 is an ok price. If you can get under that, take it. If the tires look really bad, offer $50 or $60. That setup- wheels, tires, tubes, fw- would run $200 new in the shop. If the freewheel is worn out and your chain isn't, expect to pay $20-$25 for a new one. Unfortunately, there's no way to really know until you try riding them. Also be aware that this isn't an upgrade, these wheels are basically the same ones that came stock on your bike.
    Why would you say it a freewheel? I would say its not much of an upgrade and keep looking aound.
    Seeking MB-2 Fork (19.3), Ritchey FD post silver 26.8

  4. #4
    I hate that name.
    Reputation: blunderbuss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,452
    Huh? Freewheel:
    Worked at Trek/Fisher dealer 2008-2013. Only a little biased.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •