1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    d00bie
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    How much is to much biking for a Beginner?

    Hey guys, Ive only been on my bike a couple of days now and im absolutely loving it, im hooked and completely stoked just thinking about riding. Obviously being the first couple days into the sport, im a little sore, not much...My butt is more sore than anything, but still, it isnt THAT sore at all i reckon. Ive read some threads as to what can get you into better physical condition, but im wondering about for a beginner, How much is to much riding at first?

    I dont want to bust hump or nearly kill myself riding the first couple days, but id like to feel the burn and get in there and knock it all out ya know. Tuesday i only got to ride for a little bit, Yesterday we rode for a solid 7hrs and it was killer awesome, loved every bit of it. I know thats not overkill but im just wondering how much is too much?

    Im not going to say im way, way, way, way out of shape, i can hold my own i reckon but i just dont want to hurt myself in the making. Ive read that a solid 5days of biking is good, while doing mellow rides one day, busting hump the next, then do a fast day, and so forth, switch it up a little everyday and finish out the rides with a nice trail.

    What would any of you guys suggest? Any tips, comments, suggestions? Thanks!

  2. #2
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
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    Just listen to your body. Be sure to allow some time to recover after a long day on the bike. Get enough sleep, eat well.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkj__
    Just listen to your body. Be sure to allow some time to recover after a long day on the bike. Get enough sleep, eat well.
    This. Its not to say if you need to take that and that exact day of. People are different. I would just take 1 or 2 days off in the weekends or during the week and leave it like that.

  4. #4
    d00bie
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by LowDog
    This. Its not to say if you need to take that and that exact day of. People are different. I would just take 1 or 2 days off in the weekends or during the week and leave it like that.
    Yes, yes. I cant ride on the weekends thankfully, Ill ride on Fridays, and not on Saturdays and Sundays, and Monday ill ride for 3-4 hours, and then my week starts off riding the rest of the days until the weekend starts again.

    I dont ever really want to flat out push myself or overwhelm myself while riding, i just want to get into better physical shape along with learning how to bike better.

    Ive heard a lot of people drink Protein shakes right after so they dont feel weak or overwhelmed after their ride...I think i may have to do this, not that im feeling fatigue or anything, i just think itd be good to get rejuvinated after a good ride.

  5. #5
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    Reputation: Gasp4Air's Avatar
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    Signs of over doing it:

    Blisters on your butt
    Inability to get out of bed the next morning
    Can't get hands out of the "grip" shape.

    Other than that, it's all good.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  6. #6
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
    Reputation: CHUM's Avatar
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    resting heart rate.

    when you are well rested check your heart rate immediately after you wake up in the morning (before you get up and wander around aimlessly searching for coffee and the can)....do this for a few days so you get an idea of your true resting HR.

    then...after a few hard days (or 1 hard day) in the saddle check you HR again in the a.m the same exact way you've done previously...

    if your resting HR is 10% higher than your average you need either a) take a rest day, or b) take it easy in the bike....

    in my experience...
    Visit these 2 places to help advance trail access:
    http://www.sharingthepct.org/
    http://www.facebook.com/SharingThePct

  7. #7
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    Ride - When you get tired rest. Do what your body will allow. I did a 60 mile ride Sunday. I was sore on Monday today I am much better. I will head out for a short ride tonight but this weekend I have a 50 mile ride on Sat and hopefully a 70 mile ride on Sunday. If it's too much riding your body will let you know

  8. #8
    FloridaKeys Fishing Guide
    Reputation: OscarW's Avatar
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    ... and if we just ...

    That is a tough question to answer as each of us has a different body. My way of getting in shape is taking it easy and build up stamina. I personally ride for an hour or two each day 4/5 days a week in an MTB park. S.Fl is rather flat .... I am doing more aerobic stuff and concentrate on riding the trails well and not fast as I am a noob too. After 3 months I can now ride about 4-5 trails in one go. Like others said, listen to your body...YMMV

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM
    resting heart rate.

    when you are well rested check your heart rate immediately after you wake up in the morning (before you get up and wander around aimlessly searching for coffee and the can)....do this for a few days so you get an idea of your true resting HR.

    then...after a few hard days (or 1 hard day) in the saddle check you HR again in the a.m the same exact way you've done previously...

    if your resting HR is 10% higher than your average you need either a) take a rest day, or b) take it easy in the bike....

    in my experience...


    I kinda like this. seems pretty logical.

  10. #10
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by cummins_powered


    I kinda like this. seems pretty logical.
    thanks...it's really about the only fool-proof method of knowing that you're body is being pushed too far.....

    most people don't realize that rest days are equally important as riding days when trying to improve speed/stamina/endurance/etc.....
    Visit these 2 places to help advance trail access:
    http://www.sharingthepct.org/
    http://www.facebook.com/SharingThePct

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