1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    How many have used this method to select stem length?

    This was taken from another post, but figured I would like to get some responses on what your thoughts are on this method of selecting stem length/rise.

    With the seat adjusted look down at the front axle while seated, if you cant see it because of the handle bars, youre good,
    if its behind the bars, shorter stem and/or higher angle. If its in front of the bars longer stem/ lower angle

  2. #2
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    It has alot to do with rider preference and the terrain being ridden, not just by one set method to decide stem length.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neu5p3ed
    This was taken from another post, but figured I would like to get some responses on what your thoughts are on this method of selecting stem length/rise.

    With the seat adjusted look down at the front axle while seated, if you cant see it because of the handle bars, youre good,
    if its behind the bars, shorter stem and/or higher angle. If its in front of the bars longer stem/ lower angle
    I know that method has been around for years for use on road bike sizing, I don't see how it could be applied to mountain bikes. Well, I just tried it on my MTB, I can barely see my QR behind the bar, so it looks like it would work pretty well to get you in the "ballpark".

  4. #4
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    Yea, I was curious because currently I have a 90mm 10deg rise stem and with my seat properly adjusted I am looking down at the fork crown that covers the front axle looking down. This is the stock stem that came with the bike.

    Reason why i'm asking this is because I noticed slight lower back pain and hand numbness (already messed with the seat fore/aft settings). Seat is properly adjusted with my heel flat on the pedal. I'm looking into swapping the stem, but what to see if I should stay with the 10deg rise, but just shorter length or if I can go with maybe a 70mm 6deg rise.

    Any other inputs, from others?

    Thanks
    Last edited by parkp81; 07-23-2008 at 08:02 PM.

  5. #5
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    I guess it puts you in the ballpark, but I think it's a little ambiguous. A 10mm (.4 inches) difference in stem length makes a big difference in bike handling IMO, but it's hard to tell the two apart when using that method. If you have a few stems and change them back-to-back that's one thing. Having one stem and using that method-hell you can block your view of the hub with a 90mm stem or 120mm stem depending on how exactly you sit and hold your head. Best to try a couple different lengths by riding.

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