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  1. #1
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    How long do patched tubes usually last?

    I recently patched a punctured tube with the Park Tool GP2 Patch kit, and had to use it one day out at the trails. It lasted me till the end of the day, next morning woke up and it was flat again.

    How long does your patched tube last?

  2. #2
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    my understanding is the 'glueless' patches like the gp2 are a 'limp-home' thing, meant to let you finish your ride and that's it. Standard glue patches last pretty much indefinitely if applied correctly. They can be a pain to apply on the trail, but I've had them last over a year.

  3. #3
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    Done right a patch will last as long as the rest of the tube, though I'm not sure that the glueless type are as permanant.

    The secret to a good patch is to properly prepare the surface first. Tubes develope an oxide layer on the surface and adhesion will be poor unless you sand or solvent clean it off. On traditional "glue" patches the glue isn't glue at all but a chemical that reacts with the rubber and prepares it to mate with the compatible chemical on the patch to form a permanant bond. It needs to be completely dry before applying the patch.

    I try to avoid patching on the road, and patch my tubes at home then keep them as spares. I've never had a patch fail, and I've had as many as five or six on a tube, giving up only when a new leak is too close to an old patch, or the rubber is too dried out.

    For emergency repairs on the road I use one of the band-aids I carry for patching myself.
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  4. #4
    local trails rider
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    I've had glue patches fail too but they were all from the same package: bad batch I guess.

    Glued (or vulcanized) patches can last years.

  5. #5
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    I've used plenty of the glueless patches and have not had a problem with them. The patched spots seem to last as long as the rest of the tube.

  6. #6
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    Two answers...

    1. The quick patches will last to get you home. Maybe. They're not a permanent patch.

    2. The vulcanized patches will last longer the tube.

  7. #7
    In the rear with the beer
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    Yeah, a good patch job should last until you get another hole somewhere else. I'm committed to slime tubes...but I'm in AZ where everything...everything.... has a thorn or a sharp point, so they are pretty much required....
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  8. #8
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    if you ride in a very thorny area, its time to go tubeless!

  9. #9
    In the rear with the beer
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomsmoto
    if you ride in a very thorny area, its time to go tubeless!
    I'm a rebel...I'm gonna stick with 26 inch, tubed tires, on a geared, full suspension frame as long as possible.
    Salvation Outdoor
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  10. #10
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    Thanks for the replies..

    I've only used one patched tube so far, and have 4 spare patched tubes at home. I'll wait till i use em all and see how it goes.

  11. #11
    don't move for trees
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    i've had very good luck with non glued patches, hold strong and lasted the life time of the tube. just make sure the contact surface is good and clean and check for any additional leaks. if you can't find the leak, put the tube in a bucket of water with some air in it, then look for bubbles
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  12. #12
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    I have recently patched a thorn hole with the Park glueless patches. Haven't had a chance to ride it yet, but I know this much; there will be a spare tube in my pack on my next outing regardless of how short the ride is, haha. I have high hopes for it, but we shall see...
    Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules
    my understanding is the 'glueless' patches like the gp2 are a 'limp-home' thing, meant to let you finish your ride and that's it. Standard glue patches last pretty much indefinitely if applied correctly. They can be a pain to apply on the trail, but I've had them last over a year.
    I have 5 or so of the park glueless patches on one tube, some of which have been on there for months. Haven't had any problems; the key is to properly prepare the tube.

  14. #14
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    forever

    with proper glued patches i have never had one go flat on me. even the cheap ones from the £1 shop
    i ride my bi*ch hard

  15. #15
    plays well with cows
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    glueless=ftl

  16. #16
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    In my experience glueless patches fail either due to high pressure in the tire or cold weather.

    I never had a glueless patch last on a street/road bike - which I run at +60 psi.

    None of my glueless patches ever survived a winter (several freezing rides). Regardless whether the got patched on in spring, summer or fall - in Winter they all peeled off.

    Nowadays I run tubeless or slime tubes. Slime tubes have that nice fireworks effect. Every now and then you can oggle a green fountain. The flat is at least colofrul entertaining.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

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