1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Living to ride
    Reputation: Wherebob's Avatar
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    How long did it take you?

    Just wondering how long did you take to learn or balance a sustained wheelie?

    I decided I wanted to improve my riding skills/control and a lot of hops, drops and stuff derive from a wheelie. I have been trying for 5 days, a 1/2 hour at a time with only slight improvements. My best so far is about 15 ft wheelie until I loose it. I want to be able to do a sustained wheelie.
    I'm trying not to get frustrated and I am determined and will go the distance eventually.

    So again how long did it take you?
    Last edited by Wherebob; 05-06-2006 at 10:35 AM.
    Bob

    - '06 Cannondale F400
    - '89 Cannondale SM1000
    - '90 Diamond Back Ascent

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    still dont have it.... Ive been working for about a month

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    I quit trying.

    I thought it would be a great idea to practice wheelies on hardpack sand in the shoreline at the beach. Practiced a few until I came down hard with my front wheel pointed off to one side.

    It wouldn't have been much of a problem, but since I was on sand, the front tire dug in and endo'd. I went flying over the bars and stupidly landed on one of my palms.

    I almost broke my wrist again. No more bicycle wheelies after that.

    Tried a couple times on a fully fared motorcycle. Didn't crash, but that didn't work out so well either.

  4. #4
    Living to ride
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    I take it not many of us do this?
    Bob

    - '06 Cannondale F400
    - '89 Cannondale SM1000
    - '90 Diamond Back Ascent

  5. #5
    Endurance Junkie
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    A wheelie isn't really a skill that is overly necessary when riding singletrack...

  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    Ive been working on it for months, off and on. My buddy can ride blocks on a wheelie, and can even shift while riding it. It just takes time, dont worry about it, just practice when you feel like it and you will get it eventually. Also, its not really needed.

    Matt

  7. #7
    Living to ride
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    I know its not necessary but it sure comes in handy to be able to have total control of the front end IMO. I have already noticed improvements in going over things just by the fact I can lift the front wheel up and plant it where I want it.
    Bob

    - '06 Cannondale F400
    - '89 Cannondale SM1000
    - '90 Diamond Back Ascent

  8. #8
    Freshly Fujified
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    Try another forum??

    Perhaps you'll get more response from the Urban/DJ/Parks forum?

    Just a thought.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  9. #9
    Living to ride
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    Thanks Clyde I'll do that.
    Bob

    - '06 Cannondale F400
    - '89 Cannondale SM1000
    - '90 Diamond Back Ascent

  10. #10
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
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    Pump track

  11. #11
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    I've been working on it off and on for a couple months, but I'm still pretty bad at it.

    I'm more interested in learning to manual, which is much harder but also much more useful on the trail.

  12. #12
    The Weatherman
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    Wherebob,

    A couple of summers ago I also tried to finally master the wheelie ride. I was practicing them quite a bit for about a month. Farthest ever managed to go was probably about 30 feet or so.

    Then I started to notice nagging wrist injuries that wouldn't go away. Pretty sure it had to do with the wheelies, because it happened during the same timeframe. Then again, that was also when I was practicing doing log jumps without using the big chainring to muscle over the logs.

    I quit practicing both and the wrist pain went away.

    No more wheelies for me... log jumps very sparingly. I am in this riding business for the long haul, so need to be smart about what I do.

  13. #13
    Dr. Bike
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    Despite many of the responses I've heard, I feel the wheelie is an extremely important skill. It lays the ground work for other skills such as a wheelie drop, a manual, bunny hop, log jump, etc.

    I don't remember how long it took me to master it because It was so long ago but here are a few pointers.
    You need to find your balance point and get comfortable with it. I always keep a finger on the rear brake lever. If you start going over backwards a little grab on the rear brake and your front wheel will come right down. With some practice you can learn to do this without coming all the way back down and maintain the wheelie. Also a good idea not to be clipped in until you master this skill.
    Once you get better at this, then you can start trying to keep your bike going straight or turn in circles whatever the case may be. Use the handlebars for leverage and pull the bike whichever way you want it to go. It's easiest when your at, or slightly beyond, your balance point.
    If you make something idiot proof, someone will make a better idiot !

  14. #14
    Living to ride
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    Thanks for all the replies guys. I think I just have to be patient and keep after it. Thats all I needed to know, thanks
    Bob

    - '06 Cannondale F400
    - '89 Cannondale SM1000
    - '90 Diamond Back Ascent

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