1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    how do i fix this bike chain?

    hey all. totally new to fixing chains, i had my rock hopper chain break last weekend. is it an easy fix? what would i need? Can i just take it to a shop and they could fix it for cheap?


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  2. #2
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    Yes you can take it to a LBS. No idea what they would charge for the repair.

    I would buy a new chain.

    Did the chain break when you were changing gears?
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  3. #3
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    do you have a chainbreak tool? it may be on your multitool if you have one. You could just remove the broken links and reconnect with the quick links (that most kmc x9 come with)

    you could get a replacement chain here
    Amazon.com: KMC X9.93 Bicycle Chain (9-Speed, 1/2 x 11/128-Inch, 116L, Silver/Black): Sports & Outdoors

  4. #4
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    Maybe ill just go ahead and get a new chain. I dont have any of the chain tools or anything.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tripptallica View Post
    Maybe ill just go ahead and get a new chain. I dont have any of the chain tools or anything.
    You probably want to have the bike shop replace the chain, as it requires a chain breaker to install. You have to remove a few links to get it to the right size.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  6. #6
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    You could use this as a learning opportunity. Changing a chain is easy, but you need a chain tool to push the rivets. A decent standalone tool runs between $20-30, or for about the same amount you could pick up a multitool with a chain breaker on it. Don't know what your LBS would charge to change the chain, but the tool would likely pay for itself after one or two uses. Plus, next time you have a problem on the trail, you'll be prepared to fix it and continue your ride. (Personally, I would get at least the multitool. It's a good idea to have one with you on the bike anyway.)

    You can find a good set of instructions on how to install a chain on the Park Tools website. That site goes into a lot of detail, but basically you use the old chain to measure the new chain and push the appropriate rivet out with the chain tool to shorten it. Then, thread the chain onto the bike and use the tool to pop the new rivet in to connect it and you're done.

    In your case, I probably wouldn't replace that chain. If your chain doesn't have one already, I'd pop that set of bent outer plates off and replace it with a quick link (KMC and Sram both make one, either brand would work), which makes the chain easy to remove for cleaning and maintenance purposes. If you do replace the chain and have to shorten it, save the extra piece and you'll have a source of spare links just in case.
    Last edited by jjaguar; 05-02-2013 at 10:10 AM.

  7. #7
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    Re: how do i fix this bike chain?

    Get a multitool like the crank brothers. You.don't need a standalone, you only use it rarely

    Sent from my LS670 using Tapatalk 2

  8. #8
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    +1 for the mutlitool, a stand alone is worth it if you want to have your own tools to work at home.

  9. #9
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    Well, the standalone chain tool is a shop tool, more durable and easier to use, while the multitool is light and compact and really only meant for occasional use. It's like the difference between a hydraulic floor jack and the folding jack that came with your car. If you get a flat tire on the road you'll make do with the folding jack, but if you're working on the car in the garage you'll grab the hydraulic jack. Likewise, the folding jack is too flimsy to use all the time, while the hydraulic jack is too big and heavy to carry around in the trunk for the rare occasion you'll need it.

    You should have a multitool, it's just a good idea to be able to handle small repairs on the trail, and realistically you can get by with just that. You don't need a shop chain tool unless you plan on doing lots of work on bikes.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjaguar View Post
    Well, the standalone chain tool is a shop tool, more durable and easier to use, while the multitool is light and compact and really only meant for occasional use. It's like the difference between a hydraulic floor jack and the folding jack that came with your car. If you get a flat tire on the road you'll make do with the folding jack, but if you're working on the car in the garage you'll grab the hydraulic jack. Likewise, the folding jack is too flimsy to use all the time, while the hydraulic jack is too big and heavy to carry around in the trunk for the rare occasion you'll need it.

    You should have a multitool, it's just a good idea to be able to handle small repairs on the trail, and realistically you can get by with just that. You don't need a shop chain tool unless you plan on doing lots of work on bikes.
    ^^^This^^^
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

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