1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
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    How to determine if your chain is worn out?

    On Saturday my chain snapped on a climb. My question is, what can one look for while cleaning/lubing it up to see if it's in a weakened state or could fail?

  2. #2
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    Chain snaps mostly due cross chaining, shifting under load, connecting with old rivet, ...
    Worn (stretched) chain destroys cogs and chain rings.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjhiker View Post
    My question is, what can one look for while cleaning/lubing it up to see if it's in a weakened state or could fail?
    Pick up one of these on-line or at your LBS for about $10.

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    There are other manufacturers of chain wear indicators (for a couple of bucks less) and I'm sure they work just as well as the Park model.
    Last edited by marpilli; 07-16-2012 at 07:14 AM.
    Contact information: http://about.me/marpilli

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjhiker View Post
    On Saturday my chain snapped on a climb. My question is, what can one look for while cleaning/lubing it up to see if it's in a weakened state or could fail?
    Look for a bent link....and measure chain wear with tool as per Marpilli.

  5. #5
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    I've been looking around at various chain tools in case this happens again. I've noticed that you can either get them as a standalone chaintool, or as part of a "swiss army" type setup, that includes various allen wrenches, screw drivers etc...

    Combo or not to combo tool? I currently run shimano chains.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjhiker View Post
    I've been looking around at various chain tools in case this happens again. I've noticed that you can either get them as a standalone chaintool, or as part of a "swiss army" type setup, that includes various allen wrenches, screw drivers etc...

    Combo or not to combo tool? I currently run shimano chains.
    I never combo....the separate tools are lighter and work better....storage is easy as well.

    I use the park tool that gives a read out not just a go no go....

    BTW tools measure best on clean chains.

  7. #7
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    You measure chain stretch by very carefully holding a ruler up to a tight chain and making sure that the 0 and 12" marks fall right on two pins, and not off by more than 1/16" or so. This is different than how most chain stretch tools work because it ignores the wear under the rollers, which don't contribute to gear wear.

    The only time I broke a chain, it broke at the joint where I ADDED another link. Shimano chains have a special pin that you are supposed to push back in to connect the chain, and SRAM chains have the powerlink, so I think you are not supposed to push back in a pin, ever.

    This reminds me that I need to start making more copies of my chain stretch tool.

    SJ: if u r near the palo alto area, I can test your chain on one of my prototypes.

  8. #8
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    after snapping 2 chains recently I think I need to invest in one of these (or stop reusing pins)

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