1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Hi, need some help with a new bike

    i have had good luck with fsrs in the past. im looking for a new ride since my old one was stolen. i would like some thing for riding trails and i can jump with. im 5' 10" and about 220.

    so what should i look at? sorry to say at this time i only have a bout 700-800 to spend. any help would be great thanks

  2. #2
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    about two months ago i was at that price range looking for a new bike.
    I looked at maybe 6-8 bikes, and did a lot of research.
    I narrowed it down to a specialized rockhopper and the giant xtc 1.

    now thats until i decided to stretch my budget a liitle more and buy one bike that would keep me satisfied for years.... and I bought a Stumpjumper.

  3. #3
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    Many people here really enjoy the 700DS by Motobecane.

    It's got a great parts spec and is right in your price range.

    http://bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/700ds.htm

  4. #4
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    is that a hard tail? i loved my fsr.

  5. #5
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    Nope. Notice the big springy looking thing in the back? ;

    Motobecane does make some nice hardtails too if you want to go that route. (which you really should, hardtails are just more fun)

    For jumping, it really depends on what you can take, but I'd be inclined to say go the FS route.

  6. #6
    Ride the dream
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    That price - dont buy full sus. Any full sus in that price range will be seriously flawed.
    Either in frame design or parts spec.


    In case of that motobecane - frame design. The part spec isnt awful, but the frame is an outdated, poor design.

    Not many people will say that all single pivots are rubbish (and Im not one of those that will) but this is basically a low end design.

    If youre had FSR's before - you would find that motobecane to be a pretty poor performer. If you'd never experienced better, it would possibly be tolerable - but since you have, I wouldnt touch it. I dont rate FSR as the best suspension system out there - but its not a bad one by any means, and to go back to an outdated poor design would really leave you unhappy. I'll not beat about the bush - the frame design wouldnt look out of place in walmart.

    Im not saying I'd bash all motobecane designs - the fantom DS seems a much better design - but you still get what you pay for (and it costs more than that one). Motobecane's FS designs are nothing special - from the looks of it, theyre old designs given a place (at a decent value position) in the market.
    But the truth of the matter is that you need to spend more than you are to get a new fullsus worth buying and riding.

    You really ought to look at hardtails, or used full suspension bikes (if you want fullsus).

  7. #7
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    English, something to consider here, if someone isn't completely sure about what they want, then they're obviously not the most discriminating buyer, and therefore, an outdated frame design isn't going to be a problem. If he wants to throw the bike around, and all he wants is to have a spring under his butt to smooth it out, there's nothing wrong with a basic frame design.

  8. #8
    Ride the dream
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    Mr Crimson.

    While that may be the case for a beginner (who should be buying a hardtail anyway imo, for skill development) then your argument makes sense.


    When you read that the OP has previously owned a bike with fsr suspension, your argument comes unstuck - because the flaws of such bikes become more apparent when you have owned better bikes (please note, I am not a specialised fanboy, I dont rate fsr as the best in the world - but its better than a design which these days is confined mostly to wallyworld)

    Also, if the OP has some skills already, he would find the limits of such a design much more quickly than a beginner would.


    I guess we are not going to agree.
    I would certainly not recommend such a design to anyone who has ridden a better system, and (personally) wouldnt recommend it to a beginner either.
    Feel free to disagree, thats what its all about. But you arent going to change my mind - the OP has ridden bikes which would have performed better, and so has that experience of something better, even if he isnt aware of the differences on paper.

  9. #9
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    I did clearly state he would be better off on a hardtail, and I actually completely agree with you.

    However, I have found lots of people want full suspension and would be disgusted to feel the trail under them, and would be willing to take a slight hit in performance just to have a pivoting rear end. However, for jumping on a full size bike (not a dinko DJ-specific bike) having a rear shock, regardless of the design is a nice feature, but may not be necessary depending on rider skill.

    Just today I took a jump and probably have a saddle-shaped imprint in my butt from relaxing my legs a little too much on landing.

    But none of this stuff really matters. He should just get whatever the heck he wants

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