1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Hi I'm New To This!

    Im 29 from Florida 2 weeks ago was my first time riding a bike on a trail... I rented a GT Karakoram and loved it. I was tired as hell and my butt hurted for a week, but I bought a Trek x-caliber 8 the other day it'll be here in 2 days. I would love to go biking and camping somewhere here in Florida, if u know any good spots pls let me know... THX
    Last edited by YellaBoii83 79; 09-12-2013 at 03:21 AM.

  2. #2
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    Your local bike shop is usually a good place to start for that kind of info.

  3. #3
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    start here!
    SWAMP: Florida Mountain Bike Trail Locations

    Florida Off-Road Cycling Enthusiasts

    Biking Florida - Offroad: Rail Trails & Public Land | GORP.com



    thats just what i got from google.

    i would also go to facebook, that has been a good resource for me here in DFW

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by griftymcgrift View Post
    start here!
    SWAMP: Florida Mountain Bike Trail Locations

    Florida Off-Road Cycling Enthusiasts

    Biking Florida - Offroad: Rail Trails & Public Land | GORP.com



    thats just what i got from google.

    i would also go to facebook, that has been a good resource for me here in DFW
    Aw man thanks for the replys... I will definitely check it out...

  5. #5
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    Welcome to the group!! It's fun getting bit by the mountain biking bug! Watch out though. It causes chronic wanting to bike syndrome :-)

  6. #6
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    and upgradeitis and N+1
    but yeah, being out on the trail, there is nothing like it

  7. #7
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    Lol... Yeah I'm patiently waiting on that phone call to come pick my bike up... I'm definitely upgrading the pedals... I guess ill ride it for a while, but what would u upgrade next?

  8. #8
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    ront suspension
    RockShox XC32 w/coil spring, TurnKey lockout, custom G2 Geometry w/51mm offset, 100mm travel (14.5": 80mm travel)
    Sizes
    14.5, 15.5, 17.5, 18.5, 19.5, 21.5, 23"
    Wheels
    Wheels
    Shimano RM66 center lock alloy hubs w/Bontrager AT-850 32-hole double-walled rims
    Tires
    Bontrager XR1 29x2.20" front, 29x2.0" rear
    Drivetrain
    Shifters
    SRAM X5, 9 speed
    Front derailleur
    SRAM X5
    Rear derailleur
    SRAM X7
    Crank
    SRAM S800, 44/32/22
    Cassette
    Shimano HG20 11-34, 9 speed
    Pedals
    Wellgo nylon platform
    Components
    Saddle
    Bontrager Evoke 1.5
    Seatpost
    Bontrager SSR, 27.2mm 12mm offset
    Handlebar
    Bontrager Low Riser, 31.8mm, 15mm rise
    Stem
    Bontrager Race Lite, 31.8mm, 7 degree
    Headset
    1-1/8" threadless, semi-integrated, semi-cartridge bearings
    Brakeset
    Shimano M395 hydraulic disc brakes

  9. #9
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    Just ride for now. Work on your technique and fitness and then after you've got some miles under your belt start thinking about upgrades.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash Gordon View Post
    Just ride for now. Work on your technique and fitness and then after you've got some miles under your belt start thinking about upgrades.
    ^^this^^
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  11. #11
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    It's always worth dialing in a new bike so it fits, and setting up suspension correctly.

    Here's a resource I like.
    http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm

    If it's too much for you right now, just do the saddle tilt and height parts. You can always go back later.

    Suspension setup is a pretty huge topic. But you paid for a bike with a real suspension fork and setting it up well will make a huge difference.

    First, set sag. This is how much your bike sinks into the fork's travel when you get on it. I think 20% is a good starting point. Increasing and decreasing preload controls this on a coil spring fork.

    Next, fine-tune your spring and figure out your rebound damping. I like to set the air springs in my forks to the stiffest setting that still used the fork's full travel on a typical ride. If you find you end up at zero preload and still don't use all of it or at maximum preload and still bottom out, talk to your shop about a different spring.

    For rebound damping, try the extremes and a couple intermediate positions to get a sense of where in the range you should be riding. With too little rebound damping, your fork will "pogo" after a hit. That means exactly what it sounds like. It will also ride a bit harsh. Too much damping and your fork will also ride harsh. The idea is to find the sweet spot in the middle.

    It takes a while to get this stuff sorted out. Try not to upgrade anything (maybe pedals) until the base bike is as good as it's getting.

    Good luck!
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    Upgrade your skills, it's very cost effective!

  13. #13
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    Re: Hi I'm New To This!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mid_Mo_Biker View Post
    Welcome to the group!! It's fun getting bit by the mountain biking bug! Watch out though. It causes chronic wanting to bike syndrome :-)
    That is exactly what's happening to me. Add to it that urge to buy another bike (just a week after buying my first one). :banghead:
    What works for me may not work for you. What's best for you depends on many factors. We are different from each other.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by YellaBoii83 79 View Post
    Im 29 from Florida 2 weeks ago was my first time riding a bike on a trail... I rented a GT Karakoram and loved it. I was tired as hell and my butt hurted for a week, but I bought a Trek x-caliber 8 the other day it'll be here in 2 days. I would love to go biking and camping somewhere here in Florida, if u know any good spots pls let me know... THX
    Two of the best places for camping/biking are Welcome to Florida State Parks and Ocala Mountain Bike Association - Home
    Put a mountain biker in a room with 2 bowling balls and we'll break one and lose the other - GelatiCruiser

  15. #15
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    i just purchased the xcal 8 for my gf, shes a novice for sure, im still a novice and if i had not purchased a slightly better bike on CL I would have definitely gone with a trek marlin/mamba/xcal

    great bike theres really nothing you need to upgrade as far as i can tell. if you are picky about shifters sram x7s would be relatively cheap. but really not necessary


    the normal stuff for me is more aestic and personal preference once you start riding and get a feel of what you like

    saddle, pedals(and shoes), handle bar width,

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