1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 350f's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    7

    Hi all....I'm new!

    Whats up. After getting out of college and getting an office job where I sit for 8 hours straight, I realized I'm very lazy and bought a bike. I got it 2 days ago at a LBS...its a Trek 3900. I'm hoping to get my endurance up a little just around my house then hit some trails.

    ~Andy
    Trek 3900

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 350f's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    7
    Also, any cheap mods you guys recommend? I just spent quite a bit on the bike and a helmet so I don't want to spend a lot. But I was thinking about getting some riding gloves, a water bottle holder...not sure what else? Thanks!
    ~Andy
    Trek 3900

  3. #3
    Ride 2 Work, Work 2 Ride!
    Reputation: thebigred67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,485
    Welcome!

    Gloves +1.
    "Don't give up, Never give up!"

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: strohs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    17
    Welcome! I'm fairly new as well but joined for the same reason. I'd say get a camelbak instead of a water bottle. They might cost more at first but you have a place to put your tools a spare just things you might need and dont have to get a wedge.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 9.8m/s/s's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,130
    Move the seat back on the rails, take off the kickstand and reflectors. That should save you 2 or 3 pounds. Gloves help, Camelbacks are worth their weight in gold. Have fun.
    I call for a mandate to allow only road bikes on trails to limit our speeds and increase our line picking skills-FB

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Steeeve430's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    141
    Id say the bottle would be good enough for just now. If you're just gonna be riding around your house, or even town, you won't need to go gung-ho right now and get a camelbak. It's always good to have a bottle, I use my camelbak with water on the trails and I use my bottle for gatorade or powerade. Save the camelbak for when you're sure you're into it. Gloves would be good, sunglasses too are always a plus.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,173
    For the very beginning, you will need at least tyre removal levers + 1(better 2) spare inner tube + a pump. The levers should be firm - check it, as some, cheapest, are too soft to pull the tyre off rim.I am not sure what kind of valve is on your tubes. If it is Presta(French), you will need an adapter for inflating tyres at gas stations.
    If you are going to ride on asphalt mostly, I'd recommend putting liners into your tyres, to prevent flats. If it is rather off road riding, filling the tubes(including spare) with some sealant would be better.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    22

    Welcome

    Congratulations on the new bike!

    I'm new to mountain biking too, but yeah the first thing is gloves. It makes enough of a difference to warrant the purchase.

    I'm sure you will get a lot of feedback about hydration. Sure a bottle and cage is cheaper than a hydration pack. But think about this. Sooner or later you will need a way to carry a snack, tools, wallet, etc... You might be better off getting one up front. And if you look around you can find a good deal on hydration packs.

    If you ride around after dark, you might want to keep the reflecters. Some states require reflecters all around in addtition to head and tail lights. But yeah if you don't ride late, rip 'em off.

    The important thing is you are riding!

    LOC

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    10,971
    figure out how to ride more.

    Maybe commute or commute part of the way.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Blister Butt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    307

    Ride, ride, ride, ride, ride ....

    As a born-again rider who took up mountain biking at 40, after years of being a disgusting sedentary cigarette-smoking fat-body, the best advice I got from anyone was, "Just go ride! No excuses!"

    Once you overcome the horror of the realization of how much you've let yourself slide into a despicable state of fitness and that you're gasping for oxygen like a fish while riding stuff that nine-year-olds are doing no sweat, your fitness will start to improve and then you'll be hooked!

    In other words, don't get discouraged if it's not as easy at first as other people riding bikes around you make it seem. Once you get over the hump, you're there! But you've got to get to the hump first, so do it.

    Just go ride! No excuses!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    89
    Gloves FTW!!!! I agree on the hydration pac too! The sonner you get one the better of you will be. Around here I got one for $30 at Cosco. It has every feature i could possibly want and it is reflective. I would say don;t wait to get your endurance up to go hit the trails. The trails are a great place to build up endurance and you will be using your bike for what it is intended. Good clothes make a world of diffference too. Clothes tht dry wuickly and wick away moisture ade a must if you are hitting trails in the summer and/or that have creek crossings.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    59

    Suggestions From Another New Rider

    Welcome to the forums at MTBR.com. You have come to the right place for all of your questions. I just joined a week ago and have already received extremely valuable and friendly advice from members of this community.

    The items that I purchased shortly after buying my bike last month were:

    Helmet - I wasn't a believer until my first bad fall, worn one ever since.
    Multitool - Mine has built in tire levers which work well
    Patch Kit - Has already saved me from two very long walks back to the trailhead
    Spare Tube - Just in case patches don't hold
    Inflator - I bought Co2 but wish I would have bought a mini pump, never needs refills
    Hyrdation pack - I picked up a CamelBak Mule for $60 but they sell smaller versions for half the price which would suit most of us beginners just fine as we are huffing and puffing too much to be drinking water (lol). I bought the Mule because it holds all of the items mentioned above and saved me from spendng another $20 on a quality saddle bag

    I also bought a pair of Fox MTB shorts that have nice padding where it counts and are really durable. I consider this a luxury item because I can now actually sit down for more than 10 minutes the day after a long ride.

    Enjoy the bike and the sport, it is all money well spent.
    Last edited by hulvhole; 05-11-2007 at 09:44 AM.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fishritewillie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    21

    suggestions

    I'm also new in the MTB world and love every minute of it. I purchased the Trek 6000 metallic orange/black bike from my local dealer. For the last two weeks I have been averaging 20 plus miles a day on the trails and on the streets and absolutely love it!
    Things that I would recommend to help you out in the beginning.
    1. a good pair of riding shorts with proper padding - nothing worse than a sore rear where you can't ride or sit the next day
    2. water supply of some sort - since I tend to go for longer rides I purchased a Mule pack that holds 100 oz. of water. This also allows me to carry extra supplies for those long rides
    3. Helmet, lid, brain bucket! This is a must....it only takes a few seconds to realize that without this you could be in trouble.
    4. sun glasses - helps protect your eyes from the grit/grime and bugs that come flying your way.

    Now all you have to do is go and enjoy being out in the fresh air. Have fun with your new ride!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 350f's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    7
    Thanks guys. I should have mentioned I bought a helmet when I bought my bike. I already took off the front and rear deflectors How do you take off the ones on the wheels?

    I got some loose reebok shorts, i didn't want to drop a ton of money on riding shorts and my seat doesn't bother me too much. I wasn't that impressed with the gloves Sports Authority had so i'll go back to my bike shop and check out their gloves.
    ~Andy
    Trek 3900

  15. #15
    Wheeee!!!!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    111
    Quote Originally Posted by 350f
    Thanks guys. I should have mentioned I bought a helmet when I bought my bike. I already took off the front and rear deflectors How do you take off the ones on the wheels?

    I got some loose reebok shorts, i didn't want to drop a ton of money on riding shorts and my seat doesn't bother me too much. I wasn't that impressed with the gloves Sports Authority had so i'll go back to my bike shop and check out their gloves.

    Do you ebay at all? That's also a good place to get inexpensive gear. Also check out http://www.pricepoint.com

  16. #16
    my fun has a hurting
    Reputation: cdburch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    658
    pricepoint is your friend
    small pack
    large pack

    these are the best deal you will find on good hydration packs anywhere. get to know and love pricepoint. they actually have stuff cheaper than i can get it wholesale sometimes.

    gloves are a must. slicing open your hand on a rock sucks....

    get yourself a pair of padded liners and any old pair of cutoff cargos will suddenly become super comfy riding shorts with tons of storage

    also if you are going to commute get a headlight and a blinky. i can't count the number of times they have saved my life from inattentive motorists at night.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •