1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Hi!

  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Hi!

    I am new here and new to biking. Rode motocross 35 years ago. looking at 3 bikes at this point. Looking at the felt nine series.The 50 and 60. Looking at the TREK X-Calliber 7 and 8. Also looking at the Jamis 650 series. Was looking at the Rockhopper but the closest dealer is about 60 miles away. Just wondering if anybody has had experience with these bikes. So many bikes out there and just kinda overwhelmed by it all. Any help is greatly appreciated.
    Thanks in advance
    Bill

  2. #2
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    Welcome aboard the crazy train! I also came into this 15 yrs ago with a solid MX background from back in the day, and it's all workin' out just fine for me. As long as you have no problem with the "tough guy" endurance part of it known as climbing, you're gonna love the descents...once you get used to being on a two-wheeled vehicle that's a fraction of the weight you remember from 35 years ago, but has twice as much functional suspension.

    Unfortunately I'm not intimately familiar with any of the bikes you mention. All are notable names. At this point in the process, you need to take the leap and get into it. If you find that you like what you're experiencing, you'll automatically delve deeper into it on your local trails , and start to figure out what works for you and what doesn't. In that respect, It's not a bad idea to start with something relatively entry-level, with the expectation that some upgrades are in your future. This way, if you find out this mountain-biking thing really isn't what you signed up for, then at least the investment is bearable. Not trying to burst your bubble, but I've seen this movie before.

    That said, the relationship you have with your LBS with respect to each of your choices is pretty crucial in this equation. Pester them a lot, then go with your gut based on who's responding best to your questions...that's my advice.

    One last dose of reality...the climbing never gets easier - you just get faster doing it. And getting faster is intoxicating.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the advice!Beentrying to get the most I can for the buck. I agree that the shop is very important. already rulled a couple out as they seemed a bit inconvienced by my intrusion on their day!LOL. Am very excited about getting started. After research am now starting to ride them and see what feels good.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishboy316 View Post
    After research am now starting to ride them and see what feels good.
    This is where you're going to find your bike. At a certain price point your options are more or less the same; trading a higher end this for a lower end that. It's all about finding the right balance and picking the bike you enjoy the most. It doesn't really matter why, just buy what you like.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  5. #5
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    Checked out a Scott Scale 29 comp. Didn't get to ride it as it was pouring down. Looked real nice! Threw a leg over an it felt good. Also checked out a Cannondale Trail 29 4. Real nice bike. Need to ride em and see what I think. Both Seemed Nice!

  6. #6
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    The Scott has good trail geo. Stable as it gets faster downhill but still turns quick. You will outgrow the Suntour fork when you start hitting harder/fun trails. There is a $200 upgrade from Suntour to an air Raidon.

  7. #7
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    Anybody have any dealings with the Sette line? Was looking at them on price point. Really seem to have really good specs! They are clearance priced real good.

    eb1888, Is that an upgrade at the time of purchase or what?

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