1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Help me choose please!

    Ok ,
    I think the specialized is a 2006 $500

    Specialized Rockhopper Mountain Bike

    This is a new Motobecane.

    Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Motobecane Fantom 29Trail

  2. #2
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    RE: Help me choose please!

    A new rockhopper is $880. I wouldn't buy a 2 year old bike for only 40% off let alone 7. You could probably get a 2012 model new from a shop including warranty for 25% off.

    Unfortunately I don't know anything about the other bikes.
    Sent from my HTC6990LVW using Board Express

  3. #3
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    Yea, thought the same about the age of the bike. He said there is very little bargain room. I'm gonna be patient and hit up the stores this weekend. I was thinking $350 for the Rockhopper. I'll know he won't go for it though.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    They're relatively comparable.

    Do you know what size mountain bike you're looking for? For me, there are three big problems with new riders and bikesdirect.

    -Sizing. It's not rocket science, but I think most people would do better to try bikes in the size above and below where charts put them - it's something that one has to figure out by feel. With an online bike, you don't get that opportunity. Plenty of people who know a lot about the proportions of the frame they should be on do fine, but without a reference bike that's at least close to the right size, it's a crapshoot.

    -Parts spec - Give it a close reading. Part of how BD keeps its prices down seems to involve stuff that they can get a hold of as new-old-stock or through various other closeout-priced means. It doesn't make the bikes bad bikes, necessarily, but it looks like the crank on that one is pretty far behind the times, and the bottom bracket isn't one I'd order on purpose.

    -Pricing - A surprising number of people believe that the list price given for the bike is meaningful. It's not. I'd say that BD does help you stretch a buck a little further on components, but you're not getting an $1100 bike. Some people also report some weirdness about their frames - bad dropout alignment, that kind of thing. I've been able to do my buck-stretching on used, local bikes, so I dunno.

    Craig's List can take some patience. If you figure out a good set of search terms, you can save it and have it send you an RSS feed. That's more-or-less how I found my track bike. And phone all your local shops - a lot of cities support one that specializes in used bikes.

    Good luck, whichever way you decide to go.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    Hi

    Yea, bike sizing worries me. I'm 5"11. Someone told me to order a 17.5 in the 29 motobecane. However the guy with the Rockhopper is 5"10 and his bike is a 19.

    I just need to hit the bike stores in my area to be 100% right. I'll post up my results .

    Thanks for the insight.

  6. #6
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    Im more or less in the same boat, But I dont know of a single bike shop within 3 hours of my location.

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I "doubt" you'd be happy on the 17.5" Moto. But, I'm just some guy on the Internet, and I've never seen you in person. The best I can do and feel comfortable in the idea that you might actually take my advice is to say that you should start with 19" bikes and try the 17" and 21" sizes too. (Or, for even-sized bikes, try 18", 20", 22"; for named sizes, try M, L and XL.)
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by HammerItOutNoob View Post
    If it is between those two bikes, then I personally would get the Motobecane for sure.
    That Rockhopper about a $200 bike IMO
    At best I might give $250 for it if you really liked it but that would be pushing it.

    Here is some more info on the rockhopper though.
    BikePedia - 2006 Specialized Rockhopper RH Complete Bicycle
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  9. #9
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    Ugh,
    Went to three LBS's yesterday. I gotta be honest it was super disappointing. The first shop I went to the guy hardly even listened to what I had to say because I told the guy I preffered the feel of the 26 Hardrock over the $700 cannondale 29er he wanted to sell me.

    Then I went to another lbs looked at a used 2006 -7 or 8 who knows, Stumpjumper (only 26 pounds.) Specialized Stuntjumper Bike felt amazing! Asked him if he wanted to deal. He wouldn't go below $500. LOL! Anyway. Out of all the bikes I rode that day, the best was the Stumpjumper. It was the fastest, lightest bike. Sadly, I just cannot justify paying $500 and tax for a bike that old.

    I'm suppose to go see the Rockhopper today , but the guy already told me there would be little room to deal. Specialized Rockhopper Mountain Bike. He just won't budge much. I was hoping maybe I could get him down some in person.

    I honestly don't wanna pay nearly $590 for a Motobecane with tax.

    I'm close to buying this off Amazon and slowly upgrading as I go. I hear the wheels are crap! Being on a budget is tuff. I don't wanna get ripped off however! Amazon.com: Diamondback 2013 Overdrive V 29'er Mountain Bike with 29-Inch Wheels: Sports & Outdoors

    Thanks for the suggestions. I've got the money now and might not have it later. So it's crunch time for me!

  10. #10
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    Your opinion is most appreciated. Hey check my new post and tell me what you think. Thanks man!

  11. #11
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    I guess to me, $500 for a used Stumpy in good condition isn't bad, even it is 5 years old - keep in mind that it has a new fork. Plus they say they will give you some free service with the bike. That bike was likely $1500 when new. The only other angle you have on the price is that it is a 26er and those are harder to sell these days. Good luck.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  12. #12
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    They told me I get six months free tune ups. The crank arms looked a bit beat to hell - however the teeth on were all nice and rounded , no jagged edges. I was not pumped 100% on the shock. It felt strong under me though, very strong. The frame was also an 18" however my pant size is 32 X30 (Torso man) at 5"11 1/2. Shorter legs could be why I like the ride style so much. Did you view the component list? And if so, what did you think?

    I'm thinking about going in there and waving $400 cash in their faces today and see what they say.

  13. #13
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    Bleh , components were not listed.

  14. #14
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    Sorry, not meaning to hijack this thread but I am new and can't create my own tread yet. Anyone has suggestions about the Motobecane Fantom29 Comp between the "Comp" and "Trail" versions? I am a beg to intermediate, 6'5'' 195 lbs, in reasonable shape. I am riding an old 26' and ready to getting into MTB more seriously but also need to watch my expenses : )

    Thanks in advance,

    Stefano

  15. #15
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    IMO, $500 is too much for an old hardtail with V-brakes and a garbage fork. I don't care if it does say "Stumpjumper" on it.

    $400 is too much for a new hardtail with V-brakes and a garbage fork too.

    If you're looking at hardtails with V-brakes and garbage forks, go older - I'd rather spend $300 or so on a nice old Fisher with a little nicer build. Basically, I don't think there's any advantage in something mid-2000s, as opposed to early-2000s or even late '90s if it still has V-brakes and a garbage fork, and if the mid-2000s or late '90s bike has nicer parts (and chances are not bad) and leaves me with more money in my pocket, that's what I'd choose. I'd want the older bike to have a 1-1/8" threadless headset and an 80mm or longer suspension fork. Or, I'd want to be committed to a rigid fork. Putting a much larger suspension fork on an older bike can be problematic, and headset compatibility issues crop up with the older standard.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    avoid lbs, you will not find best value there.

    that $500 CL is an absolute ripoff.

    it's normal to buy a 26er one frame size larger than you would a 29er.

    you want to find deals like this
    Giant Trance Mountain Bike 2006 Medium 18 inch XT Fox Easton | eBay

    $775 shipped, fox fork, xt drive train, full suspension. hydrualic brakes. magnesium stem, carbon bar, laserv ti saddle.

    To give you a taste, look up how much that bike would cost you new. The saddle alone is $100.

  17. #17
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob13bob View Post
    it's normal to buy a 26er one frame size larger than you would a 29er.
    I disagree. When I demo, I'm happiest on the same size 29er as my 26" bike. When I look at the geometry charts, "my" fit numbers land closest to what I'm used to when the frames have matched nominal sizes.

    This varies by brand and for the first couple years, 29ers in general tended to run large. But I haven't seen it in the last couple years - in general, I'd expect to ride the same frame size in both.

    OP, at the end of the day this comes down to reading the charts, test riding, and doing your best to come to your own understanding of what you're buying before you spend the money.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
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    Maybe this will help. I've been looking at bikes for about a month and I finally ordered the Motobecane that you asked about in your first post. I couldn't be happier. I test rode many bikes and took a chance on the Fantom Trail 29. It was actually $549 just a couple of weeks ago.

    As for size if you're 5'11 I would definitely get the 17.5. I'm 5'9 and the 17.5 was almost too big. Once I'm riding it's fine.

    Again, the Motobecane is a really nice bike for the price IMO and I learned a lot from having to put it together. I might not be as familiar with it if I would have bought it assembled. Any questions just ask.

  19. #19
    Rogue Exterminator
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob13bob View Post
    avoid lbs, you will not find best value there.
    That depends on your definition of value is.

    Yes, you will pay more money at a LBS than online or buying used.
    However, there is value in having somebody help you find the right bike, the right fit, put it together, tune it up, give you an additional tune up(s) for free after break in, and not to mention the warranty that you get only if you are the initial purchaser of the bike.

    So I say if you are a new rider and unsure of about what to get and the how to tune a bike than you will find the best value at a local bike shop.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

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