1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
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    Help! I want to get back to mtb-ing

    Hello! I used to ride my bike all the time as a kid (both as transportation and on the local trails) but then I got a car a few years ago and haven't ridden my bike since. I was planning on hitting the trails this summer but I lack a bike. Unfortunately the $500+ necessary to get a decent quality mtb is out of the question, and my current bike is a $120 Walmart bike (and an old one at that) which I would really rather not go on the trail with. So I was hoping someone could give me some suggestions on where to get a bike. Is it possible to rent a bike from a bike shop for the summer? If so, how much would it cost to rent a good quality hardtail from May to September? Or, would it make more sense to simply buy one and then sell it at the end of the summer? If I bought a good hardtail from a LBS, would they buy it back at the end of the summer and how much money would they give me for it? Hopefully in about a year I will have a better job and be able to purchase a high quality mountain bike but until then I have to find a different solution.

    Any suggestions welcome.

  2. #2
    I play hard to want
    Reputation: Offrampmotel's Avatar
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    http://www.giantbicycle.com/us/030.0...sp?model=11391

    Sure, it's not going to be the best bike on the trail, but it will be light years ahead of the bike you have now, will have a warranty, and will be assembled by people who actually know what they're doing. Plus, it will be a good way to get into a great sport without the risk of spending a ton of money to find out that it's not really for you. And next season you can always upgrade to something better.

  3. #3
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
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    Check out Norco, they have a very large line to pick from.

    http://www.norco.com/ts/pass/templat...&col=mattegrey

  4. #4
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    So the consensus is that I should just buy a lower-end new mbt rather than renting one? If I buy a $300 bike now, how much will I be able to sell it for at the end of the summer? Also, why does that Giant Boulder in the link above have its top frame bar slanting down, like a girl's bike?

  5. #5
    The Weatherman
    Reputation: Pawndream's Avatar
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    So the consensus is that I should just buy a lower-end new mbt rather than renting one? If I buy a $300 bike now, how much will I be able to sell it for at the end of the summer? Also, why does that Giant Boulder in the link above have its top frame bar slanting down, like a girl's bike?
    Yeah, if I were you I wouldn't really look at renting a bike just for a single ride. Doesn't really make sense if you want to continue riding.

    Low end quality mountain bike (such as the Giant Boulder/Boulder SE, Trek 820, or Specialized Hardrock) are all going to be your best bet when operating on a shoestring budget... unless you find someone selling a used bike that is in decent shape. Be careful on used bikes though. You can get hosed on those real easily.

    Other bike companies make bikes in the $300 range, but I just listed the ones that you have the highest chance to walk into a shop and actually see.

    I wouldn't look at selling these bikes back to a shop after a season of riding. Buy these bikes and ride them until you are ready to buy a new bike. You might be surprised how long these little bikes will hold up for you. They are all solid bikes. When your money is absolutely burning through your pocket, go ahead and buy a more $$$ bike, but keep around the low end bike for a beater/commuter/loaner.

    About the top tube bar on the Giant Boulder, it looks pretty normal to me. I actually have a friend with that same bike and it serves HIM just well. He has just as much fun on the trail as those on far more expensive bikes.

    Oh, and another thing... I will probably get flamed for this, but I don't really care. That Wal-Mart bike you have? Go ahead and ride that bastard on the trail. Just go over the bike before hand and make sure that everything is in decent order. Be careful. Don't do any crazy stuff (like drops, etc).

    I was once stuck in Biloxi, MS without a bike and the only rental I could score was this rusted out beater of a Huffy. It took about an hour of TLC to get it into decent trail-shape, but it got me on the trail. That Huffy ran through 15 miles of singletrack that it had no business on, but you know what? It got me there! And it was fun!

    Ride what you got if all else fails. Even if it is a Wally World bike. The worse that could happen is the bike breaks. ALL bikes break. If it breaks, big deal. Just be careful and ride within your (and your bikes) limits.

  6. #6
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pawndream
    Oh, and another thing... I will probably get flamed for this, but I don't really care. That Wal-Mart bike you have? Go ahead and ride that bastard on the trail. Just go over the bike before hand and make sure that everything is in decent order. Be careful. Don't do any crazy stuff (like drops, etc).

    I was once stuck in Biloxi, MS without a bike and the only rental I could score was this rusted out beater of a Huffy. It took about an hour of TLC to get it into decent trail-shape, but it got me on the trail. That Huffy ran through 15 miles of singletrack that it had no business on, but you know what? It got me there! And it was fun!

    Ride what you got if all else fails. Even if it is a Wally World bike. The worse that could happen is the bike breaks. ALL bikes break. If it breaks, big deal. Just be careful and ride within your (and your bikes) limits.
    I wont flame you for it just change it a little, ride it to the top of a nice clif & chuck it, be shure to have a camera. Actually at night with flairs between the spokes would be cool.
    I agree if it's all ya gots then the rest is up to the rider.

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