1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    159

    Help with Hardrock build?

    Hi all,
    I am doing a small bit of upgrading to my Specialized Hardrock Sport.
    The first upgrade I did were Avid BB7's, with SD7 levers and FlakJacket Cabling.
    $200 well spent, they're amazing.
    But this led to an issue of the current forks only being rated to a 160mm rotor, I put a 185 on it.
    So now I need new forks.
    I am tossing up between the RockShox Recon Silver TK Air, or the Tora U-Turn 85-130mm, both with the remote lockout.
    Then I realised, that if I were to get the Tora, there U-Turn would be pointless on the go as I needed to move my seat anyways.
    So I have come to the conclusion that I need a hydraulic seatpost-a KindShock i950-R.
    All up, the forks will be at most $350 and the seat post $280 ish.
    I don't mind spending money on it, I really don't want to upgrade the bike.
    Are these mods good to begin with? Have I chosen the right brands?
    I am also seriously considering going to tubeless-what is the benefit to this? If you ask me, it makes your tyres more sustainable to damage as there isn't two barriers against, say, thorns (ie. Tyre and tube).
    Could someone explain?
    And any other modding ideas are welcome
    Thanks

  2. #2
    DynoDon
    Reputation: manabiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,667
    I'd look at the weight of them forks, the Tora is heavy. Your putting alot of money in a starter bike, I'd keep it as a back up/loaner, and get another bike. In the long run you'll have a much better bike for the same money and a back up bike. Its good time to pick up a 2011 with the new ones coming in, the demo bikes are a good deal now too, with the full warranties, Good Luck/Happy Trails
    Four wheels transport the body,

    Two wheels transport the soul !!!!

  3. #3
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    12,314
    Don't worry about going up one rotor size from the rated one.

    You have a thing about paying retail, don't you... Why? Thanks to the wonders of the internet, we all have the equivalent of a basic factory sponsorship, at least for common products.

    I'm a bit of a poster child for upgradeitis - I have a Hardrock too, with a mostly upgraded build. If I had access to the prices I do now when I bought the bike, or was in less of a hurry at the time, I would have gone higher-end in the first place. I started chewing the original parts before I had time to make a plan. Oh well. Anyway, I've tried to get parts that I can consider terminal upgrades - I have a fork I really like, and won't replace until I can't fix it anymore. Do you think you'd be happy with a Tora or Recon Silver for the life of the bike/fork? I don't think I would be...

    Definitely do your homework on a hydraulic seat post. People have problems with some of them, but I can't say I can remember which. I find myself to be a bit of a doubter of the utility of those seat posts, but I think that's probably more reflective of where I ride and how I do it than the seatposts themselves - most of my terrain is rolling, and I have a pretty rapid cadence. Mountain bikers seem to think they need to have their saddles really high for peak power, and it might be true for the ones with really crap form, and in a riding environment with alternating sustained climbs and descents, I could see the device making more sense than it does on my trails.

    Anyway, bolting $800 to a $440 bike, despite the fact that I've done something similar myself, doesn't strike me as a very cost-effective strategy. Look around a little and spend the $600 you have left on last year's Rockhopper.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    159
    Yeah I would look at upgrading my bike but I am upgrading my car next year and really can't afford a new bike. At least with parts I can work away at getting them.
    What did you mean in regards to paying retail?
    I'm not really sure what direction I'm going, I will upgrade to a Camber Comp eventually but I just want to do the forks at least to get more life out of it.
    I'm happy with the Hardrock at the moment, and my new car (looking at a VW Amarok) will fit it perfectly in the tray.
    I was just wondering if anyone had ideas, most specially on the fork as the rotor upgrade has done some damage to the fork (combined with other things of course), so if it would be better for me to get a better fork, I wouldn't know what is good. That's why I'm here

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    12,314
    The default answer to the fork question, when someone has the budget, is to get whichever Fox fork fits their needs, in the fanciest damper available. That retails for several hundred. I think the F100 with the cherry on top is $750ish? But you can get it on EBay for a lot less, more like $400, or lower if you don't mind going older, or with fewer options. Do you think Fox's warranty is worth $350? Is being the first person to ride the fork, or having your bike be the first it's ever been mounted on worth $100?

    Tons of stuff that's a model year old, or some other thing like that that IME doesn't matter ends up on clearance. I'm lucky enough not to have to search around the 'net for those prices anymore, but with a little time invested, everyone can get the same more reasonable prices.

    I notice you're in Australia, so it may be a little harder. Sorry about that.

    I gotta say that I'm quite happy to have a vehicle that's worth less than my bikes, as long as it keeps running. And I might have to buy a bike worth more than my car if I get a new car, just to keep my priorities in order.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    159
    Ah, yeah I see I could come across that way. If anything that's just because, as you've stated I'm in Aus, it's easiest to see what the fork does, comes with and reviews. I'm more than happy with an IME, clearance or second hand fork, and it's probably what I'll end up with. As of today though, I'm having somee issues with my hub or QR, I'm not sure which.

    Unfortunately a car is first priority for me at the moment, I need a four wheel drive pick up for work. So the biking is unfortunately just one of my side hobbies

Similar Threads

  1. SuPrBuGmAn's '10 Hardrock 29er Build Thread
    By SuPrBuGmAn in forum Specialized
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 03-15-2013, 07:36 PM
  2. is the hardrock sport a decent frame to build up?
    By pablo4429 in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-13-2011, 04:34 PM
  3. Hardrock build for my wife
    By SuperJETT in forum Specialized
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-16-2010, 08:55 AM
  4. Hardrock for DJ--how should I build it up?
    By xbrinelax2011 in forum Urban/DJ/Park
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 01-06-2010, 06:28 AM
  5. Hardrock for DJ--how should I build it up?
    By xbrinelax2011 in forum Specialized
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 12-15-2009, 07:06 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •