1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    94

    Help with Enduro

    So I ride a 2007 Specialized Enduro on pretty easy groomed trails with the occasional root. I love the plush feel of the bike on the way down the hill but would like to improve it's uphill ability.

    Would I benefit from putting a rear shock on the bike that has real lock out and pro peddle?

    I know that the best way to improve anything is to practice... but can the bike be improved as well?

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,480
    Did you post that thread the other day?

    Regardless, I think a shock with a lockout feature would be an improvement. I haven't been made into a FS fan yet, but I did a longer ride on a bike that had lockout and propedal, and both features work. I think by the end, I was leaving the shock in propedal and turning the fork on and off.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    94
    Yes I have been trying to learn about my bike... was just wondering what I could do to improve it for my needs. Thought about replacing the triple clamp but with the price of forks and wheels and and and I don't think that would be worth the weight loss.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,480
    Actually a different fork might not be a bad idea if you could go to adjustable travel. It depends on what you feel the Enduro is doing to mess with your climbing mojo. Basically, you need to stop thinking in terms of weight - it's obvious but actually not that important - and look at what messes with your flow or the pedaling of the bike on the way up.

    Money is always something you're going to run into with this stuff, and so is the difficulty of turning a monster truck into a rally car. But there's no reason you can't have a better balance at times. Just keep the real emphasis of the Enduro in mind.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    253
    The fork and shock that came on the bike were good when it was built. Have you lubed all of the pivots and had the fork and shock rebuilt? Replacing the seals, bushings, and fluids will put you back at the starting point. Then comes playing with the settings (compression, rebound, and air pressures - might be spring preload for the fork).

    Personally - because I ride on varying trails and am out for fun I leave the compression and rebound roughly in the middle. I start at an air pressure that sets the sag at 25% of the travel (use a zip tie around the tubes as a sliding marker). If the bike is bottoming too much add 5 pounds. If it's trying to throw me to the ground take out 5 pounds. Tune what you have and see if it makes it better. If that doesn't work - then start buying new parts...

  6. #6
    Thread Killer
    Reputation: Hardluckhero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    106
    I posted in your "Speed" post about the dual crown fork on the Enduro. If it is the fork that came stock it should be the e150 future shock fork that has travel adjustment from 150mm to 100mm. I think its on the left hand side (can't remember) and I think it is marked "attitude". It will drastically change the effective head angle and leverage when climbing and make a huge difference in your climbing ability with the enduro. Is that the fork that is installed?
    Cholla cactus=nature's guard rail.

  7. #7
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,510
    Quote Originally Posted by rightguard View Post
    So I ride a 2007 Specialized Enduro on pretty easy groomed trails with the occasional root. I love the plush feel of the bike on the way down the hill but would like to improve it's uphill ability.

    Would I benefit from putting a rear shock on the bike that has real lock out and pro peddle?

    I know that the best way to improve anything is to practice... but can the bike be improved as well?
    The bike has a great front shock but may be on the slightly heavy side, but the bottom line for uphill ability on that bike lies primarily in the rider's endurance and abilities.

    I'll be the first to admit that I'm not good going uphill - I wear down quickly and the best I can do is to do short bursts uphill, and take breaks. The only encouragement I have for myself is enjoying the downhill when I "get up there". Endurance training is probably the key for uphills, and by forcing myself to work uphill, I know I will get better...eventually.

    The rear lockout will probably help, but you can try stiffening up the rear suspension by turning up the compression, increasing the pressure (reduce sag to 15%) and reduce the rebound damping a little.

    -S

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    94
    Thanks guys I am hearing what you say...

    I do set the front forks to climb and stiffen up both rear and front.

    How often do I need to rebuild shocks and forks?

    The bike is old but I bought It brand new two years ago. It sat for a long time and I'm just getting back on it. For sure I need to get way better just didn't know if something else would help.

  9. #9
    Wēk Ss
    Reputation: IAmHolland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,511
    Quote Originally Posted by rightguard View Post
    How often do I need to rebuild shocks and forks?
    Yearly (or roughly 100-200 hours) depending on usage. You have per ride maintenance to keep the wipers clean.

  10. #10
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,510
    Quote Originally Posted by rightguard View Post
    Thanks guys I am hearing what you say...

    I do set the front forks to climb and stiffen up both rear and front.

    How often do I need to rebuild shocks and forks?

    The bike is old but I bought It brand new two years ago. It sat for a long time and I'm just getting back on it. For sure I need to get way better just didn't know if something else would help.
    As long as you were taking care of the shocks, 1-2 years is still "new" based on how little you've had ridden. If controls work as they should, hold 99% of the air etc, and I don't think you'll need service anytime soon. Keep it clean and it will serve you well - the 100-hour service is a guideline - I only service my shocks (DIY) when I feel that they aren't right.

    You've got a pretty competent bike... ride it more, and as you get better, you'll have a better idea of what parts to swap out.

    -S

  11. #11
    backwoods and backwards
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,203
    I had an "07 enduro sl....it's the only bike I ever regretted selling. If you have one of the E150's that works do not get rid of it...you'll never get a fork that light that feels that stiff.
    Moonbeam's compost-powered hybrid generates a respectable 32 fruit flies per rotting banana peel.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,848
    So far no suggestions have come up to make your bike light and easier for you to ride uphill. From the easy groomed trails description of your rides, this bike would not be on a 10 bikes list of best choices. A 25lb 29 hard tail with a Reba dual air would be on that list- like a Scott Scale Elite. That bike and your trails would be fun and a lot faster uphill. It wouldn't be good for big jumps and high speed downhill through rock gardens like your bike, but you don't ride that.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    94
    Thanks for all the comments

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •