1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    65

    Help deciding between 2 Gary Fishers

    So I've just recently started getting back into mountain biking... I've done it a little in the past, and have been getting back on the trails around southern Michigan (Potawatomi, Highlands, Brighton...) but my only mtn bike is sorely underequipt to even be rideable on many of the trails (no suspension, poor gear shifting...). Thus I've been looking around for a solid entry level bike, searching craigslist and the like, in an attempt to find one that can carry me for the next year or two until I can afford to jump to a FS.

    I've come across two bikes both of which fit me well and are possible candidates, so I was wondering if any of you could help me and with some input as to which might be the better value, or better bike overall.

    The first is a 2000 Gary Fisher Tassajara priced at $250
    It has all stock components and is still in great shape.
    Here's it's Bikepedia component list:
    BikePedia - 2000 Gary Fisher Tassajara Complete Bicycle
    And Here's a picture of the bike:
    Gary Fisher Tassajera pictures by themerv019 - Photobucket

    The Second is a 2010 Gary Fisher Marlin priced at $200
    This bike is mostly stock components as well but has upgraded pedals to some mid level Crank Brothers Egg Beaters. It also comes with a bike computer, unsure of the model though.
    Here's its Bikepedia link:
    BikePedia - 2010 Gary Fisher Marlin Complete Bicycle
    No Picture for this guy though...

    Both Bikes fit me well, are in great rideable condition.
    The color/design doesn't really worry me much, either would be fine.

    If you could give any input into which would be a better value or overall bike I would really appreciate it, I'm kinda in over my head as it is now!

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    T.W.O
    Reputation: pfox90's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,730
    I'd get the Marlin it's a lot newer with the same spec although technology has progressed. Just a newer bike that may not need nearly as much maintenance as a 2000 bike.
    ------__o
    ----_`\<,_
    ---(_)/ (_)

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    65
    Yeah, that was kinda my thought process as well. The only thing I'm a little concerned about are the egg beater pedals. Most rides I'll still have a few near wipeout moments where I'll put a foot down to stabilize myself. I know clipless pedals have their advantages, but how much more expertise do they require to ride?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    25
    Pedals are easy to change and you can get some platforms for under $50. Get the Marlin.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,662
    pedals are cheap. yes, clipless have their advantage, but there's a learning curve. i tried, switched back to platforms, mainly due to my bmx background. i'm ok with the disadvantage. the advantages of platforms outweigh their disadvantages for me. for others this may be different, its pretty much up to the rider. as for which bike to buy, obviously the newer one would be my pick. i wouldn't buy a 10 year old bike that i didn't plan on rebuilding, but i wouldn't rebuild a mountain bike. if it were an 80s mongoose or something cool, yeah.. but mountain bikes just aren't cool. to me, mountain bikes are pure function. they hold absolutely no nostalgic value, so i would buy the best bike i could afford. i assume you feel the same way about them. so with that in mind, newer = better 99% of the time, unless the newer bike has been completely trashed. that happens. i could take a brand new bike and make it worthless in a month if i really wanted to. that's entirely possible. but if it is in good condition, go for it. 50 bucks cheaper, 10 years newer...

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    65
    So it looks like the 2010 Marlin may have been taken off the market. The seller is no longer responding to my emails, despite my asking to go up a price a bit... So I guess my new question: Is the 2000 Tassajera still a solid enough bike/deal to make it worth while, or should I keep looking? My price range is about $350, so I have a little breathing room I've just had a tough time coming across bikes in my area that are big enough for a 6'2" guy like myself.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •