1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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  1. #1
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    Help Cornering...(Bar width? maybe?)

    So I've been riding about 4 years, weekend warrior type. I feel that I do pretty good - I can do rock gardens, small gap jumps, roller jumps, climbs, technical roots etc fairly easy. The one thing I find my sef doing....A LOT....is over steering a corner. Higher speed corners - no problem. Climbing corners - no problem. It's usually flat ground corners where I'm just at pedaling speed (7-8mph I'd say).

    I'm 5'11" - 205lbs - pretty athletic
    2012 trek mamba size large (19" I think) - stans flow - nobby nics
    90mm 6 degree rise stem, 685mm low rise bars

    What's my problem? Oh an I included a pic of what I tend to do in the flat corners.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Help Cornering...(Bar width? maybe?)-corner1.jpg  

    Cycle tracks will abound in Utopia. ~H.G. Wells

  2. #2
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    Oh and tire pressure is 28 front and 32 back.
    Cycle tracks will abound in Utopia. ~H.G. Wells

  3. #3
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    Re: Help Cornering...(Bar width? maybe?)

    Highly doubt bar width or set up has anything to do with it. Since u can take it high speed it sounds to me like you are leaning too much when taking it at low speeds.

    Focus down the trail on the corner exit and pesal smothlybthrough it. Or take it faster and drop the ouside pedal while leaning the bike under u.

    Sent from my GT-I9192 using Tapatalk 2

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Are you counter steering?

    Bikes are pretty stable vehicles. The front wheel "wants" to get back under the bike if it's not. When you're turning, it's not under the bike. So without a little pressure on the grip on the inside of the turn, it'll do exactly that.

    We tend to do it instinctively. But people can mess themselves up by over-thinking it.

    It may help to try keeping the bar stationary relative to the top tube and doing everything from your hip.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    wider bars will slow down the steering, and u still have to get used to it and dial in the proper technique.. u say the corners you "pedal trough" are u bobbing all over trying to get speed? that might mess up ur hands, another cornering trick is feathering brakes, front brake makes the bike lean into the corner, rear brakes makes the bike want to stand more, i think is more about proper technique than buying something to fix it.. counter steering too, it helps holding the line better without thinking about it, look way ahead and trust the bike.. it will get u there

  6. #6
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    I think you might be over steering because you are pedaling. I try not to pedal too much in turns so I don't accidentally drag a crank.

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  7. #7
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    I think you can drop the tire pressure by 5psi front and rear as an experimental change. As long as you aren't getting rim hits or rollover you can run lower pressure than you are.
    Then ride that corner at a lower speed until you get the technique down. Reride and stay there until you get it.

  8. #8
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    you are looking down

    stop staring at what is in front of your wheel look at least 20 feet ahead or more the bike will follow because the crap actually under your wheel at any given moment you were looking at 20 feet ago, and your brain has already processed it and your body knows what to do without looking, believe it or not

    look ahead, don't look down...and hammer. only look down when you need to pick your way through really chunky complicated stuff, and then only look briefly. look ahead and like magic your flow improves

  9. #9
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    Pedaling might be throwing you off a little bit, but I think it is more of a technique issue.

    Where are your eyes looking when going through the corner?
    How are you weighting the bike?
    Are you leaning the bike or your body?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    you are looking down
    I would agree with this. I find I have all sorts of issues on narrow bridges because I start looking down right in front of me, and then suddenly my wheel is wobbling back and forth as I try and make lots of tiny little adjustments instead of just looking forwarding and riding. I also find I have an easier time at speed than I do while riding very slowly.
    2012 Specialized Carve Comp 29
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  11. #11
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    Great replys! Yeah the looking down seems to be something I might be doing. The braking is interesting too. I always try to brake BEFORE the corner...is that right??? I wish I knew more about HOW to use the front brake to my advantage. I user the rear like 90% of the time.

    I may have misled you guys...I never really pedal "through" said corners, it's just at pedaling speed. No real decline or incline to speak of.
    Cycle tracks will abound in Utopia. ~H.G. Wells

  12. #12
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    Oh a few more things. I am typically sitting when this occurs - because it's on flat ground and was pedaling before the turn and will be pedaling after. The outside pedal is always down and I try to use my body to lean as much as I can. And YES I counter steer and go off trail the other way after I over steer. It's getting annoying - figured I'm doing something wrong.
    Cycle tracks will abound in Utopia. ~H.G. Wells

  13. #13
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    I agree with the folks saying your are probably looking down, or not far enough ahead. There could be other technical issues you can work on, but looking through the corner is a big deal, since you can't place your bike at the apex if you don't know where you want to end up.

  14. #14
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I use the front brake a lot more. The only tricky thing is that since it actually has traction and tends to get more traction as I use it, I can throw myself over the bars. Since I don't sit my bike like a corpse, it's not big deal. I get a little further back on the bike. Or a lot further back, depending. I can't get nearly as much stopping power from the rear brake without skidding it, which makes a lot of sense given how the bike rotates under braking.

    Braking before a corner is good technique, IMO. You get a limited amount of traction, so you won't be able to turn as hard and stay hooked up with the brake applied, or vice versa.

    In skiing, there's pretty good consciousness of two types of turns: GS (giant slalom) and slalom. I feel like I only ever read slalom turns being discussed in a MTB context. But I don't read you as saying that's your problem. Slalom turns are all about getting the piece of equipment around something without changing one's direction of travel. That's often pretty applicable in MTB, especially once people start really talking technique. If you think about riding a flow line, they often have series of linked, bermed turns. But when you think about the overall direction of travel, it's still down the mountain.

    What I'm reading is that you're trying to change your direction while making the small adjustments to your turn shape to stay on the line you meant to choose.

    So here's my suggestion. Go ride in a parking lot and practice making turns with different shapes and sizes. Try angling the bike and not your body if you like. But also try keeping your hips, shoulders and feet in line, so you tip the bike and your body as a unit. Try wiggling your bike around under those turns. Try pedaling through them. Mess with it. Just try to find your balance so that your stable in the turn. For me, a big marker of a slalom style turn is that it self-corrects - the bike wants to come out of it. That's great on a flow line or on wooded singletrack that gets around tree trunks and bushes but doesn't really change its overall direction, but I don't think that's what you're asking about.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
    I have Flat Pedal shame.
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    Hard to say without actually seeing it in action. Concentrate on the basics and take it slower. Lean your bike and not your body, look through the turn, turn with your hips, counter steer, etc. I typically practice cornering in a Figure-8 for a good 5 minutes before I hit the trail.
    I don't care what you ride or how you ride just as long as you ride.

  16. #16
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    I was over steering like that,
    I simply leaned a little less on entry,, as In a late wide entry.

    I steer wide and stay to the outside as best I can until I see the apex...

    The Apex to me is where I can see the exit, there I can dive low and that pumps the bike.

    U gotta delay that left hook you got so when you do drop down your line is
    pointing out of the corner exit...

    ,,,,maybe go faster ,,really I mean it.....


    Or your weight is too far forward,, U loading the outside pedal ???

    These newer bikes,,, center of gravity,,through the pedals,,,

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