1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Having trouble with a Trek 820 (1992) upgrade

    Hey guys this is my very first post so be gentle....

    i just recently got a Trek 820 1992 (no suspension) after riding it for the last month, its a GREAT BIKE!!!! its light, gears work great and body is good........

    everything is good with the bike the only thing i want to do is mod the front fork with a suspended fork......but i am having trouble what steer tube size it is.........

    is it 1" or 1-1/8" i cant find any info on this PLEASE HELP!!!!!!

    and length?

  2. #2
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    Bikepedia . Measure it. Post a picture.

  3. #3
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    trek 820 mod

    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    Bikepedia . Measure it. Post a picture.
    ok thanks.....so i know now that its a 1" steerer tube does that mean i need a fork with a 1-1/8" or 1" im confused do i have to get the slightly bigger 1-1/8" to accept the 1" steerer tube or the 1" fork is designed to take the 1" steerer tube.......

    IM A NOOB THANKS
    JLumbs

  4. #4
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    Having trouble with a Trek 820 (1992) upgrade-2e6458f4.jpg

    measure your fork

    1 1/8 you need a 1 1/8 inch steerer

    1 inch you need a 1 inch steerer. These are not common.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  5. #5
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    Really you can't add a modern fork to a 1992 frame. It was not designed for a fork and the bike will handle badly.

    post a picture of your bike

    does your bike look like this?
    Having trouble with a Trek 820 (1992) upgrade-quill_stem_3.jpg
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    Really you can't add a modern fork to a 1992 frame. It was not designed for a fork and the bike will handle badly.

    post a picture of your bike

    does your bike look like this?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Yes it looks exactly like that....

    and its got quick shifters shimanos aceras

  7. #7
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    don't bother. the frame was designed for a non-suspension fork of a certain height. if you add a suspension fork, it will jack up the front of the bike which will adversely affect steering and handling. it will likely cost more than the bike is worth. also, with a 1" threaded headset, there are VERY few forks you can get in there. the frame will only work with a 1" fork, so any modern 1 1/8" fork will not fit in there. if you happen to find a 1" threadless fork, you will need a new headset and stem too.

    in other words, it's NOT worth the effort. your bike is an antique but it's a good, reliable bike. if you want to ride trails on it, get the fattest front tire you can fit in there. I ride a rigid fork with a FAT tire on rough, rocky trails around Austin TX and I can keep up with a group and have a good time. ask your local bike shop to try some tires and see how fat you can go.

    if you're really enjoying riding mountain bike trails, you will probably want to get a modern bike soon. bikes have changed a LOT since that bike was new. think about how much computers have changed in that time! your old bike will still make a great backup/ grocery/ spare/ commuter bike.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    don't bother. the frame was designed for a non-suspension fork of a certain height. if you add a suspension fork, it will jack up the front of the bike which will adversely affect steering and handling. it will likely cost more than the bike is worth. also, with a 1" threaded headset, there are VERY few forks you can get in there. the frame will only work with a 1" fork, so any modern 1 1/8" fork will not fit in there. if you happen to find a 1" threadless fork, you will need a new headset and stem too.

    in other words, it's NOT worth the effort. your bike is an antique but it's a good, reliable bike. if you want to ride trails on it, get the fattest front tire you can fit in there. I ride a rigid fork with a FAT tire on rough, rocky trails around Austin TX and I can keep up with a group and have a good time. ask your local bike shop to try some tires and see how fat you can go.

    if you're really enjoying riding mountain bike trails, you will probably want to get a modern bike soon. bikes have changed a LOT since that bike was new. think about how much computers have changed in that time! your old bike will still make a great backup/ grocery/ spare/ commuter bike.
    well if your talking about computers ur talking to the right guy i build gaming ones for myself and friends and do repairs.......seems that tech is slowing down though, dont know if its the companys or tech it self...anyway lol

    ive compared the weight by feel mind u...and this bike is light compared to my friends rebok oregon and a few of my other friends bike.....i did just buy a schwinn bike for like $300 just a month ago just an entry bike, and the granny 820 still lighter and timed it to be faster and to be honest i prefer the old 820 to my schwinn and ive been riding it ever since......

    i just wanted to try to soften it up on the front.......i dont even want to spend money on it cause i know its old....but i found a front suspension for around $70 thats including shipping i know its not a good brand name but like i said dont want to burn lots of money on it.......i also found this on ebay which is a little bit more pricey SR Suntour CR 9 Suspension Fork 700C Black 1" 210mm Threaded | eBay

    what do you guys think still not worth it???????

  9. #9
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    that fork is for a hybrid with skinny 700c tires, so it's not even the right size wheel. the tire will probably not fit in the fork and the brakes will not line up with the rim. and like I said, it will screw up the handling.

    put a fat tire on the bike and ride it with low pressure, like 28 psi. if you want to do more than that, just save your money and invest in a modern bike.

  10. #10
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    Cheap suspension forks actually have an inferior ride to riding rigid. They don't track well, aren't always tunable to the appropriate spring rate for a given rider, often don't have functional rebound dampers... you can end up with a harsher ride and more trouble getting through technical sections.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    ok u guys sold me.....i think i will save up or watch for used trek in the higher 2000s i like the 3700 but still too expensive for me maybe 3500..........

    Last question do you guys think IT CAN BE CHEAPER to build your own?????? kinda like when u build a computer.....u get to pick what parts you think is important and go cheaper with the other parts......just a thought over this coming winter im really going to weigh all these options....

    Thanks guys for all your help!!!!!

  12. #12
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    Just for information

    What you most likely have is a 1 1/8 threaded (steerer tube) fork.

    The part that holds the handle bar to the fork is called a quill. The diameter of the quill is 1 inch. The inside diameter of the steerer tube of the fork is 1 inch for the quill to fit.

    Having trouble with a Trek 820 (1992) upgrade-stem-bottom.jpg
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  13. #13
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    Re: Having trouble with a Trek 820 (1992) upgrade

    It's generally more expensive to build your own.


    Now, buying a gently used bike is where deals may be had.

    Happy biking!

    Sent from my LG-P769 using Tapatalk 2

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JLumbs View Post
    ok u guys sold me.....i think i will save up or watch for used trek in the higher 2000s i like the 3700 but still too expensive for me maybe 3500..........

    Last question do you guys think IT CAN BE CHEAPER to build your own?????? kinda like when u build a computer.....u get to pick what parts you think is important and go cheaper with the other parts......just a thought over this coming winter im really going to weigh all these options....

    Thanks guys for all your help!!!!!
    In my opinion it is cheaper to buy an entire bike. I have brought bikes to strip the parts off and give the frame away. It was a cheaper way to get parts then buying parts on there own.

    Many say it is cheaper to buy parts and build a bike. You would have to be a very good and patient shopper. You also need some special tools to build a bike. Paying a shop to build a bike can be "dollars"
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    Just for information

    What you most likely have is a 1 1/8 threaded (steerer tube) fork.

    The part that holds the handle bar to the fork is called a quill. The diameter of the quill is 1 inch. The inside diameter of the steerer tube of the fork is 1 inch for the quill to fit.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    yes then.....i know my quill is 1" so what your saying is i have a 1-1/8 steerer tube???? if so that opens up lots of other poss.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JLumbs View Post
    yes then.....i know my quill is 1" so what your saying is i have a 1-1/8 steerer tube???? if so that opens up lots of other poss.
    I don't know for sure what you have. I would have to measure what is on your bike to know for sure. You need to learn about bikes so you know what you have. To learn about bikes go to Sheldon Browns site. Read and learn.

    Threaded 1 1/8 inch forks are rare. RST make one it is a "crap" fork.
    To add a threadless fork to your bike you would need a new headset as well.

    New forks are longer than what your bike is designed for. This would turn your bike into a "chopper" and it would handle like crap and not turn corners. Cheap forks are worse than rigid forks. Forks that work cost about $200. To get a shop to install it will cost around $50. You need specail tools to install a headset. To learn about bike repairs go to the Parktools website.

    Buy a new bike.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Cheap suspension forks actually have an inferior ride to riding rigid. They don't track well, aren't always tunable to the appropriate spring rate for a given rider, often don't have functional rebound dampers... you can end up with a harsher ride and more trouble getting through technical sections.

    Read this post again.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  18. #18
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    This is correct:

    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    Name:  headset-threaded-1-small.jpg
Views: 471
Size:  27.6 KB
    1 Inch threaded headset
    (common traditional size)
    (7/8" Quill is noticeably smaller
    than a U.S. Quarter)
    Name:  headset-threaded-118-small.jpg
Views: 590
Size:  30.5 KB
    1 1/8 Inch threaded headset
    (rare size, mostly 1990s bikes)
    (1" Quill is a teeny bit larger
    than a U.S. Quarter)

    from sheldon brown headsets
    MOMBAT: Trek Bicycles History

    Looks like Trek may have gone to 1-1/8" steerers in 1991.

    So, if you got a fork with a threaded steerer that was the correct length (not likely to find that easily), you could use the existing headset. Otherwise you'll need a new threadless headset. I would try to get one with 63mm or less travel so you don't bork the geometry too much. If you want to use the existing wheels, it will need brake bosses for cantilever or v-brakes. Most (if not all) 63mm travel forks will have brake bosses. If you stay with cantilever brakes, you'll need to make sure you have accommodation for the 'hanger' that cantilever brakes need. If you go with v-brakes, you'll need v-brake levers (or a hinky adapter that I wouldn't recommend).

    This would be the type of fork I would look for:

    Rock Shox Vintage Judy XC Suspension Fork | eBay

    It looks to be a 63mm travel fork, (if not a 50mm travel model), but this particular one looks pretty roached. This one has the v-brake style arch, but that can be replaced with one that has the hanger built in for cantilever brakes (I have one laying around in my garage parts bin). They used elastomer springs, but you might be able to find replacement coil springs (Speed Springs are what I would search for). The plastic dampers were also prone to leakage, but you could sometimes find an Englund brand aluminum cartridge. Sounds like a lot of problems, and they're not perfect, but the old Judy forks were more sturdy than the Quadra and Mag models.

    You might also be able to find an older 63mm SID. Again, not generally as stiff as the Judy.

    You might also stumble across a vintage Marzocchi that could work, or possibly a Manitou.

    If you go threadless, you'll also need a threadless stem.

    So, if you choose to try to find a fork that won't make the bike steer like a dump truck, it will be tricky to find one at all, let alone in good working condition. And it could mean at least a few other parts would also need to be purchased. I wouldn't buy a fixer upper as parts are getting very difficult to find these days.
    Last edited by jeffj; 08-17-2013 at 02:59 AM. Reason: In the interest of truth and clarity ;~)

  19. #19
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    ok ok i get it... 8( the bike does so great and i wanted to give it a little more ummmph i guess keep it as is........one thing i learnt from all this...(just caught the bike bug just last few months) is i hate cheap gearing components..... which this old trek has decent altus ones from shamano even though there old as F.....they switch better than the bike i just bought a month ago which has tourney components

  20. #20
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    I disagree a
    A 1 1/8 inch steerer tube takes a 1 inch quill

    A 1 inch steerer tube takes a 7/8 inch quill

    see Sheldon see Stem
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by JLumbs View Post
    ok u guys sold me.....i think i will save up or watch for used trek in the higher 2000s i like the 3700 but still too expensive for me maybe 3500..........
    it will definitely be much more expensive to custom build a bike. like 3 or 4 times more expensive.

    the Trek 3500 and 3700 are not really trail-worthy bikes. they are mountain bike-shaped hybrids that are great for gravel bike paths and LIGHT trails. they have flimsy forks that will handle badly as described above and do not have strong, durable components that will handle the abuse of actual mountain bike trails with any sort of technical features. my experience working at bike shops has shown me that you can't really get a decent trail-worthy bike for much less than $1000 at a bike shop. anything less than that is usually a mountain bike-shaped hybrid.

    if your budget is less than that, you can get a bike online if you have the tools and skills to assemble and adjust it at home (or at your local bike co-op). or you should be looking for a used bike.

  22. #22
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    Having trouble with a Trek 820 (1992) upgrade

    You have a few choices. Your best option is the rigid fork. And then I think I'm correct in assuming its a 1" headtube so you can look for a 1" suspension fork with 63 mm of suspension and that won't throw things off too badly. They're around. I just sold one this week. There's also this old thing called a softride stem. I don't really care for them but some people loved them. The rest of your choices will require more parts to be swapped so I think that's been covered.

    Otherwise, you are best off saving up and getting a new used bike.

    Good luck!

    Here's the old catalog, FYI

    http://www.vintage-trek.com/images/t...ikecatalog.pdf
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  23. #23
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    Name:  headset-threaded-1-small.jpg
Views: 471
Size:  27.6 KB
    1 Inch threaded headset
    (common traditional size)
    (7/8" Quill is noticeably smaller
    than a U.S. Quarter)
    Name:  headset-threaded-118-small.jpg
Views: 590
Size:  30.5 KB
    1 1/8 Inch threaded headset
    (rare size, mostly 1990s bikes)
    (1" Quill is a teeny bit larger
    than a U.S. Quarter)

    from sheldon brown headsets
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    it will definitely be much more expensive to custom build a bike. like 3 or 4 times more expensive.

    the Trek 3500 and 3700 are not really trail-worthy bikes. they are mountain bike-shaped hybrids that are great for gravel bike paths and LIGHT trails. they have flimsy forks that will handle badly as described above and do not have strong, durable components that will handle the abuse of actual mountain bike trails with any sort of technical features. my experience working at bike shops has shown me that you can't really get a decent trail-worthy bike for much less than $1000 at a bike shop. anything less than that is usually a mountain bike-shaped hybrid.

    if your budget is less than that, you can get a bike online if you have the tools and skills to assemble and adjust it at home (or at your local bike co-op). or you should be looking for a used bike.
    so far from what i learnt is from the area around me which im lucky i have allot of trails not hardcore but trails aNd in between them is allot of road paths....so i do need something that can do both....i want the speed and less loss of energy of a hard tail and some suspension of mountain trail bike (front suspension) i know i what something very light and has good gearing with tire size some where in the middle maybe more towards trail riding

  25. #25
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    it sounds like a hard tail mountain bike with disc brakes and a decent fork with a lock-out option would be perfect for you. something like that costs $800-1500 new. do you have an REI near you? the Novara hard tails are pretty decent and they have some killer deals on some older models on clearance sometimes. just be sure to get something that fits you.

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