1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Hardtail questions

    Hi all! I'm the new guy around here. I'm 15, and I'm a real outdoorsy person. I ride dirt bikes, and I've given BMX a try. I got the MTB bug real serious last week, so Saturday I went to my local bike shop and purchased a 2012 Trek 3700 Disk. I'm 6'6", so I got the 21'' frame. I've ridden it down the gravel roads during those 3 days, and I really enjoy it. I've got 60 miles on it as of tonight. My question is-on the trail, (hitting a mountain this week, and it's pretty mountainish!) will this bike stand up to any small jumps (5-10 feet) and 1-2 foot drops without breaking? Don't want to wreck my new ride, and I like some opinions. Thanks

  2. #2
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    It all depends on the landing
    Welcome to the site.
    Round and round we go

  3. #3
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    Mostly No
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  4. #4
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    That bike is ok for the rides that you have been doing ,anything more an you will start breaking things ,parts or bones .

  5. #5
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    Re: Hardtail questions

    The bike will likely hold up to abuse but doing jumps and drops will feel sketchy on that bike. The geometry just isn't right for that type of riding. You will likely hurts yourself as it will be very hard to approach and land correctly. It's just an example of having the right tool for the right job. This is a fire road bike and while you can push it to its limits, you are just asking to get hurt.

  6. #6
    undercover brother
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    Your wheels and fork will be the first thing to go, but it is your first bike. Ride it like you stole it. Welcome to the most expensive hobby out there.

  7. #7
    local trails rider
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    Just riding wheels on rough ground, you'll be uncomfortable enough that you'll keep the speed safe for the bike.

    If you have really ideal landings for finishing the air times, the bike can survive it. HARD landings, on the other hand...

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tangaroo View Post
    Your wheels and fork will be the first thing to go, but it is your first bike. Ride it like you stole it. Welcome to the most expensive hobby out there.
    I can think of many much more expensive hobbies!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    Just riding wheels on rough ground, you'll be uncomfortable enough that you'll keep the speed safe for the bike.

    If you have really ideal landings for finishing the air times, the bike can survive it. HARD landings, on the other hand...
    Geez. Sure sounded better than that when I bought it!!! Guess I'll just ride it carefully, with all that in mind. I'll head down the mountain and see what happens, pretty much! Thanks for the welcome and the heads up. And by the way...another REALLY expensive sport you can try is motocross

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by moefosho View Post
    I can think of many much more expensive hobbies!
    LOL! Me too. Tangaroo must have never owned a boat (Bust Out Another Thousand).
    Surly Cross Check: fat tire roadie
    Surly LHT: Kid hauler
    On One Inbred: SS 26er

  11. #11
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    I come from the "any bike, anywhere" school of thought, so I say go for it. Just don't be a hero. Its okay if you have to walk occasionally past the steepest/most technical stuff. You probably want to at least change your tires. Run the widest tires that will fit at the lowest pressures you can. Tubeless, even better. For a little more money, swap your components onto one of these - then you can really rock n' roll!
    Surly Cross Check: fat tire roadie
    Surly LHT: Kid hauler
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  12. #12
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trekker124 View Post
    Guess I'll just ride it carefully, with all that in mind.
    What I really meant is that your body will probably tell you when it is time to slow down. Either parts of you start getting tired, or your brain tells you that taking it easier would be smart.

    If the bike is in good shape, the wheels are the most likely thing to fail if you land hard.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  13. #13
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    The bike is a 2012 model, and I bought it brand new from my LBS 4 days ago, so it's in pretty good shape Bolandjd-I really enjoyed your post and the links on your post. My motto has been "poverty breeds ingenuity", which is something I made up riding motocross tracks on my Yamaha RT 180. It's the same now-I bought what I can afford, and I'll use it for everything. I'll hit the trails with my 3700 and enjoy it! Hats off to all of you guys-I'm already enjoying this forum! Only thing is is the screen is way off to one side on my monitor, so I can't see about half of what I'm typing, but that's none of your fault Better dive into the computer settings and see what I can do

  14. #14
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    The screen issue happens on my phone sometimes too. It seems to happen when i click back rather than clicking on the link at the too if the page to go back to the main page from a thred. I would not worry to much about you bike. I rode an 09 trek 820 for a few years before getting a more expensive bike. I rode the **** out of that bike, i hit jumps, rode down stairs, stopies. My son is now riding it and it is still fine. Only dif is the 820 is steel, not aluminum, and the fork on the 820 was crap, bottom of the line coil sprung suntour. Your 3700 will have better componets, and alot better fork. I would take it easy first to see what it will handel then try your luck at some larger jums. I can tell you it wount be like hitting jumps on an MX bike, you will need to soak up the landing with your legs if you are hitting big jumps. Also just make sure to clean your derailers and chain after riding in woods. And watch out for sticks they like to rip off rear derailer.

  15. #15
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    Great beginners bike but meant mostly for cross country riding not downhill mountainous terrain. Bike like other have said, ride the hell out of it and enjoy! Welcome to the sport!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    It all depends on the landing
    Welcome to the site.
    Exactly. Jumping off a 1 or 2-foot ledge onto a downward slope isn't going to be any harder on the bike than riding over a fire road with "washboard" erosion patterns.

    OP, what do you weigh? When I was a kid I jumped off 5' drops to flat ground on an "English Racer" type bike. But I weighed 70#.

  17. #17
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    Wel.. the Yamaha RT180 I ride is a trail bike, not the MX bike I use it as. However, I don't listen very well, and it seems to work just fine, but I do wind up taking a lot of the shock over big jumps with my legs. Like I said, I'm 6' 6", and I weigh 199 lbs. The reason I don't just round it up to 200 is that that is Travis Pastrana's number!!! I don't know what any of the jumps on the trails will be like yet, but I'll probably hit them and see what happens. The man at the bike shop has jumped 3700's quite a lot, but he said if you land a little sideways the wheels will bend, but he said that he would bend them back for me if I bent them, so what do I have to worry about? Yeah washerboards can beat the stuff out of a guy!

  18. #18
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    People said the same thing when I bought a hardrock.... I've been launching that bike off jumps for 2 years... Worse thing I broke was my rear rim .... People talk about things breaking more then they actually break things..... It was the same way when I drag raced.... You need xy and z to do this otherwise you'll break your car.... Who cares.... Just keep ur eye on things....you have prolly more mechanical experience then most coming from a Motocross background so have fun and remember land smooth

  19. #19
    Merendon Junkie
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    1 to 2 foot drops should be no problem. Try to be smooth on the landing and absorb as much as you can with your body, but that goes with any bike.

  20. #20
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    Thumbs up to you guys!!! Yes sir, I do have quite a bit of mechanical knowledge. Enough that I should be able to keep watch on my bicycle good enough-they're a lot simpler than a dirt bike! What you guys were saying about the landings is SO true riding MX tracks on my RT 180-you can't just pin it and FWOP down somewhere on the other side of the landing-you gotta be precise! Thanks everybody!
    !

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