• 08-19-2012
    kawashark
    Good point. Once you have refined your riding skills a FS may allow you to spend more time in the saddle and conserve energy, but you have to know how to pick your line for the least amount of suspension travel and therefore lost energy.
  • 08-19-2012
    zephxiii
    I truly believe in owning and appreciating both HT and FS :-)

    Sent from my MB865 using Tapatalk 2
  • 08-19-2012
    jeffj
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Cutestuffies View Post
    Hello all,

    I've been reading the posts and they have been very informative. However, I'm more confused than ever. I am just getting back to riding from a 10 year hiatus (since high school). I wasn't a seasoned rider, but enjoyed it very much.

    A couple of issues though:

    1. I'm 5 foot nothing!
    2. I am debating between a HT and a FS. I am looking for either the Myka HT series, the Anthem 4W and the Myka FSR. (Again, I'm limited due to number 1).
    3. I am riding on my own, my SO isn't interested at this point. That's not a big deal, but a point of interest since I see many people discussing riding with their lady :)
    4. I am going to use the bike 1-2 times a week for a 3.8 mile commute each way to school -- not a long distance but in a city atmosphere.

    So my questions, which type of bike?! I'd like to purchase within the next few weeks, so I"d love some help!

    Thanks again all!:idea:

    Unfortunately, bikes (especially a nice bike like you are looking at) at school are a magnet for thieves and vandals, as mentioned above. Unless you have a VERY secure location to store the bike, I would look for a craigslist beater (that costs less than $100) for commuting to school. Think UGLY, but functional.

    As for a trail bike, I would need more information about you, the terrain you'll be riding, the intensity of your rides, difficulty, and budget.

    Being 5'0" may have some advantages in that you can find some smokin' deals on small and extra small bikes. And, I think you may have more to choose from than you might believe.
  • 08-19-2012
    Cutestuffies
    I'm sorry my post was a bit ambiguous. I will be riding trails but in addition riding 1-2 times a week to school, definitely NOT only riding a MTB to school only.

    I wouldn't spend 2k on a bike that is only for road travel.

    Thanks though!
  • 08-20-2012
    perttime
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Cutestuffies View Post
    I will be riding trails but in addition riding 1-2 times a week to school, definitely NOT only riding a MTB to school only.

    It hought that might be the case.

    Get a nice MTB for the trails AND get an expendable beater for going to school.
  • 09-07-2012
    mg2380
    Quick question for you guys. I get a pretty steep discount on Diamondbacks through work, and I can’t decide what bike to get (hardtail or full suspension)… I’m looking at the Overdrive Pro, & the Sortie Comp. Do I save the extra $300 and stick with the Overdrive? Or say “screw it” and get the Sortie? Decisions decisions… Also, this is my first bike in over 15 years. So part of me thinks I should ride a hardtail until I get back into the swing of things. Your insight would be great appreciated.

    Thanks!
  • 09-07-2012
    bob13bob
    What are the forks on this?

    sent from one of my 4 gold leafed iphone4s's
  • 09-07-2012
    mg2380
    Overdrive Pro: FOX 32 FLOAT CTD 29" 100mm travel, open cartridge, ext. rebound and lock out, QR15 thru axle, butted Alloy steerer, 32mm aluminum stanchions

    Sorite Comp: Fox 32 FLoat CTD Air, 140mm travel, open cartridge, with ext. rebound knob, 32mm Easton aluminum stanchions, magnesium lowers
  • 09-07-2012
    AndrwSwitch
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mg2380 View Post
    Quick question for you guys. I get a pretty steep discount on Diamondbacks through work, and I can’t decide what bike to get (hardtail or full suspension)… I’m looking at the Overdrive Pro, & the Sortie Comp. Do I save the extra $300 and stick with the Overdrive? Or say “screw it” and get the Sortie? Decisions decisions… Also, this is my first bike in over 15 years. So part of me thinks I should ride a hardtail until I get back into the swing of things. Your insight would be great appreciated.

    Thanks!

    Can you demo?

    If you keep the bike five years, $300 now isn't all that much one way or the other. If it's not going to mess with your ability to pay for more important things, IMO it's always better to start with the one you like best.
  • 09-07-2012
    DavyRay
    Sortie Comp.
  • 09-07-2012
    Meridian725
    I started out on a hardtail and am now ready to go full suspension. Stoked.
  • 09-09-2012
    mg2380
    Thanks for the replies guys! I think the Sortie Comp is the way to go. Now I just have to figure out what size I ride. Unfortunately no shops in Denver have one to test out... DB's website says I ride a size small (16"-17"). But size small on the Sortie is 15.5"... Size medium is 17". BTW: I'm 5'7" with a 29ish inseam.
  • 09-09-2012
    AndrwSwitch
    Is that your pants inseam, or did you do the ritualistic thing with the book?

    Regardless, 5'7" could go either way.

    Have a look at the geometry chart for the Sortie. In particular, check out the effective top tube length. Ride some bikes that are available to you. Remember the sizes of the ones that felt about right, look up their top tube lengths, and get the Sortie that comes closest.
  • 09-09-2012
    mg2380
    Nope, I used a tape measure

    The only Sortie I could find close by was a 2012 Sortie 2 29er (the 2013 Sortie Comp is 26er). It felt a little big... Even though the sales guy said it looked fine. He was probably just trying to sell me a $2600 bike. ;-p

    I know they're completely different, but the small Overdrive (hardtail) fit me perfectly. It has a 22" top tube length. The small Sortie has a TTL of 22.5". So maybe that's the way to go...
  • 09-09-2012
    AndrwSwitch
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mg2380 View Post
    I know they're completely different, but the small Overdrive (hardtail) fit me perfectly. It has a 22" top tube length. The small Sortie has a TTL of 22.5". So maybe that's the way to go...

    Probably close enough. You're already going a little longer with the small Sortie. So going even more longer-er would be going further away from your best reference length.

    FWIW, here's something on getting a more precise inseam measurement.
    Bike Fit Guide: Save 35-70% Every Day at Sierra Trading Post.
  • 09-12-2012
    JBerry3rd
    I plan on starting with a hard tail for my first good mountain bike. From what I've been told at the local stores, the good FS bikes are too expensive for my price range right now, which is around like 700
  • 09-13-2012
    mk.ultra
    started with a hardtail, sticking with a hardtail for numerous reasons. prime reason being that I simply cannot afford a decent FS, but I also love the simplicity and lighter weight as many others have said.
  • 11-25-2012
    Nakkoush
    which decent HT bike do you recommend for around $1,000??
  • 11-26-2012
    perttime
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Nakkoush View Post
    which decent HT bike do you recommend for around $1,000??

    One that fits YOU, and YOU are comfortable riding.
    ... the choice might also depend on what kind of trails YOU usually ride.
  • 11-26-2012
    dhosinski
    First find a bike in your price range that is comfortable and can handle the kind of riding you will be doing like the previous post said. If you will be doing off road (trails etc) then you should consider doing some research on the type of suspension (if any) that the bike has, plus the components, specifically the derailleurs. Get the most bang for your buck. I think you'll find that a lot of bike have just about the same component groups, but you may also find a close-out on a previous model year which would be the best way to save cash and get a great bike.

    Good luck
  • 11-26-2012
    zebrahum
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    One that fits YOU, and YOU are comfortable riding.
    ... the choice might also depend on what kind of trails YOU usually ride.

    Someone needs to write a bot that posts this response to every single "what bike" thread then closes the thread.

    If I listened to bike magazine reviews and online comments (almost exclusively from people who haven't rode the bike) about my ASR7, there is no way I would have bought it. Reviews call it too tall with not enough standover and no clear purpose. Had I caved to the reviews I would have never had a chance to own one of the most fun bikes I've ever been on and ended up with some other bike like the excellently reviewed 575 (which I found twitchy and no better at climbing than the 7).

    Moral of the story is that everyone is different; from the proportions of their arms and legs to their torso to the way that everyone looks at and rides whatever trails they are near. No one on the internet should be able to make a better recommendation than you riding a bike for yourself. Of course, it's not always possible to ride everything before you buy it, but it is always worth spending the time trying to ride as many as you can.
  • 11-26-2012
    dhosinski
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Someone needs to write a bot that posts this response to every single "what bike" thread then closes the thread.

    If I listened to bike magazine reviews and online comments (almost exclusively from people who haven't rode the bike) about my ASR7, there is no way I would have bought it. Reviews call it too tall with not enough standover and no clear purpose. Had I caved to the reviews I would have never had a chance to own one of the most fun bikes I've ever been on and ended up with some other bike like the excellently reviewed 575 (which I found twitchy and no better at climbing than the 7).

    Moral of the story is that everyone is different; from the proportions of their arms and legs to their torso to the way that everyone looks at and rides whatever trails they are near. No one on the internet should be able to make a better recommendation than you riding a bike for yourself. Of course, it's not always possible to ride everything before you buy it, but it is always worth spending the time trying to ride as many as you can.

    Good Point!!!!
  • 11-28-2012
    perttime
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dhosinski View Post
    plus the components, specifically the derailleurs.

    Derailers are overrated.
    (and I don't necessarily mean that you need to go singlespeed, like I did)

    Every not-quite-beginner bike out there has at least XT or X7 derailers because it is the one component that people will stare at, whatever the shifters, brakes, wheels, forks or cranks.

    ... I'm exaggerating a bit to make a point ... ;)
  • 11-28-2012
    kjlued
    Not going to read the whole thing to see if the correct answer to the original question was answered.


    Hardtail or Full Suspension for New Rider?

    The answer is Yes

    As in one of each. You can always get more later.:thumbsup:
  • 11-28-2012
    Gladi
    HT for 2 reasons, it's light, and it will give you all the reasons why you should've bought a FS, in the first place.