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  1. #1
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    Hand position when climbing

    While I was climbing a rather steep uphill today, instead of wrapping my thumbs around the grips I laid my thumbs horizontally on the top part of the handlebars, and I could've sworn the climb felt a little easier. Anyone else have experience with this?
    Granny gear lover

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Do it all the time.

    There's nothing intrinsically easier about it, IMO. Just do whatever works for you. You probably gave yourself a little extra room to get a little lower over the bike - a physically more powerful position for most of us when we're really working it.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
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    I've noticed that before as well, but I couldn't tell if it was actually easier or if it just felt easier because it was something new/different. For the time being I'm just going to agree with AndrwSwitch.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Do it all the time.

    There's nothing intrinsically easier about it, IMO. Just do whatever works for you. You probably gave yourself a little extra room to get a little lower over the bike - a physically more powerful position for most of us when we're really working it.
    You're right. I noticed that I was able to get my face lower towards the handlebar, and also that it was easier to pull the handles back towards me. That's what probably made it feel easier.
    Granny gear lover

  5. #5
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    I've been using this technique for the last several rides, and now there's a loud squeaky noise coming from the front of my bike whenever I climb
    Granny gear lover

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Bummer.

    That could be a lot of things - headset, one of the stem clamps, fork, hub. Try to make it happen when you're off the bike, so you can narrow it down.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K. View Post
    I've been using this technique for the last several rides, and now there's a loud squeaky noise coming from the front of my bike whenever I climb
    Check the rider first

  8. #8
    Probably drunk right now
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    I'd start with...

    Quote Originally Posted by John K. View Post
    I've been using this technique for the last several rides, and now there's a loud squeaky noise coming from the front of my bike whenever I climb
    I'd start with check the parts that receive more torque while climbing:

    Stem: Handlebar and steerer tube interfaces. You can test this by moving one of your hands inside your shifter/brake on the handlebar and your other hand on the head tube. Be careful.

    Seat: rocking on your seat may be causing the creak. The test for this is to come off your seat while climbing to see if the creak goes away.

    From there, it could be a number of different creaks based on the type of bike you ride.

    Creaks will drive you nuts. I have one that I'm trying to track down. It just takes a while to isolate the cause.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  9. #9
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    Hold your front brake and rock the bike forward and back slightly. There should be no play, if there is the headset needs adjusting. Even the slightest bit of play can cause all kinds of creaking noises.

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  10. #10
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    Truth is I've been yanking back on my handlebars as I've climbed, but I didn't think that this would knock anything loose. Guess I shouldn't do that anymore and focus more on my legs, or at least not yank as hard.
    Granny gear lover

  11. #11
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Hauling on the handlebars is not necessarily bad. That's what they're there for. Just try not to have it be wasted effort.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    This is something that I have been doing for a little while now. If I remember correctly I read it in MBA. Part of the reason the climb feels easier is because by putting your thumbs on top of the bars your "relaxing" your grip. So there's not as much "wasted" energy.

    I have for me, it allows me to focus more on my cadence. It also feels alot more natural/comfortable to me now. I have noticed that some of my climbs have actually gotten faster (though they are still slow compared to some of the guys that I ride with).
    Last edited by H6NVGce; 10-28-2013 at 04:36 AM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K. View Post
    Truth is I've been yanking back on my handlebars as I've climbed, but I didn't think that this would knock anything loose. Guess I shouldn't do that anymore and focus more on my legs, or at least not yank as hard.
    You should be able to yank on your bars as hard as you can endlessly without an issue. If you are getting anything to move by doing this, something's not adjusted/installed/manufactured correctly.

  14. #14
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    Hey guys, I love where H6NVGce is headed with this thread. Tension creates using unnecessary energy. You should be able to wiggle your fingers when climbing trail that is not super techy.
    Weight should be centered over the bottom bracket. Once the terrain gets steeper, the center of gravity changes and your body needs to adjust in order to stay balanced over it. By scooting forward on your seat and bending your elbows you can maintain a relaxed yet efficient body position for climbing.
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  15. #15
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
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    I usually cradle the bar end lock-on caps, simulating I have bar ends and that works good too. Nobody needs a crazy, firm grip(or bakes) climbing.
    "The mind will quit....well before the body does"

  16. #16
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    Duplicate post...
    Last edited by H6NVGce; 10-19-2013 at 05:38 PM.

  17. #17
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    I also do this when I climb, but I also find myself doing it when im getting tired.. and im sure one day it will lead to me face down in the dirt. Im trying to make sure I only do it during climbs
    Rockhopper 29er

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  18. #18
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    Anyone with input please chime in-

    Another thing that I have noticed here recently is that when I put my thumbs over the bar, my shoulders neck and back feel more relaxed. I have also started paying more attention to my breathing. I have started to forcefully exhale 2 or 3 times immediately before the climb. I ve been told that it helps to get fresh oxygen in, and old oxygen out. I can say that it has seemed to also help on alot of the climbs that I have been having trouble with. It seems like this "technique" has helped me to get farther up the climbs then previously before I run out of breath.
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  19. #19
    Now, THAT'S gonna hurt!
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    Relieving hand pressure by placing them on top of the bars and relaxing them shifts the work to your core, where it should be. I do it all the time just for that reason. It helps a lot with building core strength.

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