1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    12

    GT Timberline FS vs DB Response

    Hey everyone, new guy here looking for some advice. My buddy has been trying to get me into mountain biking for a while now and he took me out last week. Now I'm hooked! I'm looking for an entry level bike but I'm on a college budget so something relatively cheap and used is what I am looking for. I found these 2 local to me on craigslist and was wondering what you guys thought of them.

    GT Timberline FS. The owner thinks its around a 1995 and it is a L (which is my size).
    http://tallahassee.craigslist.org/bik/1848724703.html

    Diamondback Response: 2006 and the owner doesn't know the exact size but thinks it is a L. (any ideas??) Also he is very flexible on price. I could probably get it for about 170ish.
    http://tallahassee.craigslist.org/bik/1846389681.html

    Anyway, any advice you guys have for me is much appreciated. I can't wait to have a decent bike I can hit the trails with and upgrade as I go along. Happy to be on the site and looking forward to learning from all of you!!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: anavrinIV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    332
    how tall are you? fit is key. that response is not a large, I can tell by the picture, and it's even more so not a large if it fits someone 5'7. The timberline is old and if it's been well used then it will probably need a good bit of work.

    Without knowing more about you or either of the bikes it'll be hard to get a read on which bike you should get.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by anavrinIV
    how tall are you? fit is key. that response is not a large, I can tell by the picture, and it's even more so not a large if it fits someone 5'7. The timberline is old and if it's been well used then it will probably need a good bit of work.

    Without knowing more about you or either of the bikes it'll be hard to get a read on which bike you should get.
    Im 6'0 160lbs. I went to my LBS to sit on a few different bikes and they fitted me for a L. Unfortunately, the cheapest bike they had was around $450 and it would be a good amount of time before I could swing for something that price.

    I didn't think that response was a L. I might try to check out the GT in person though. Any suggestions on what to look for if I do? Also, I know my my budget is really effecting my options but I'm all ears to any other suggestions on bikes I should check out or save a little more for.
    Last edited by KelticTJ; 07-17-2010 at 10:33 PM.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    256
    If you check out the GT, look to see if there are any cracks on the frame. Pass if you see any.
    You probably want a bike that works, so check to see if the gears work. How do the tires look?
    Do they have tread? Are they showing visible cracks along the sidewall? If so, they might need to be replaced
    Check to see if the fork moves. If you put your weight on the front end, does the fork compress? Does it easily return to normal position? If not, the fork is probably shot and it isn't worth rebuilding a fork from '95.
    You can use a tape measure to check the chain. Measure a 12" section of chain. It should line up pin to pin. If the pins are more than 12 -1/16" apart, then you would need to replace the chain. Replacing the chain could lead to other issues such as slipping gears, etc, which is a sign the cassette and chainrings need to be replaced.

    Honestly, I'd wait to see if something better pops up. I frequently see Trek 3 (3700, 3900) or 4 (4100, 4300) series and Specialized Hardrocks that are 2-3 years old listed for under 200.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •