1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: GT Dilemma

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    2

    GT Dilemma

    Thanks in advance for helping a noob guys.

    About 17 years ago, a friend that ran an LBS sold me a GT Outpost trail (all terra) for 100 bucks. He was closing out the 1995 or 96 model year stuff that he still had. It's a HT with no suspension up front, all original and it's obviously a triple triangle. Long story short...It sitting in my garage and hasn't been ridden in 12 years at least and looks brand new (minus the cob webs).

    Now I'm looking to buy bikes for my wife and kids, I already know better than a department store bike for everyone, question is...do I spend the money to upgrade and modernize my vintage GT or just start over with an new entry level bike? I'm definitely trying to stay sub 400 or 500 bucks. If I do the latter, the GT is probably gonna just get a motor kit as a project, or get sold.

    If you think I should spend the money on the GT instead...what should I do?

    BTW, I'm a paved and light to medium trail rider only.

    Thanks again guys!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,875
    I would try riding it . Put in the least amount of money into it you can .If you are riding with the wife and kids on paved and light trails ,it would be a good bike.

  3. #3
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,925
    That bike has a 1" head tube, so it will be difficult to find a suspension fork that will perform well, not to mention keep the geometry in line. Additionally, it will cost you a crap ton to update all that needs updating, and then you will still have a relatively short travel bike with a v-brake or cantilever brake (at least on the rear brake). The rear wheel is a seven speed (may even have a freewheel instead of a freehub - not positive) drivetrain. If you do use a v-brake on the rear wheel, I would advise getting one of those horseshoe looking braces or your seat stays will spread as you apply the power to the v-brakes. You also have not only the 1" head tube, it comes with a threaded headset. Basically, you'll be replacing almost every part on the bike, and it won't be as good as what you could have otherwise done with that money with more modern equipment.

    How do I know this?

    I have a 1996 GT Outpost. The only original parts left on it are the frame, and the front derailleur.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    2

    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    That bike has a 1" head tube, so it will be difficult to find a suspension fork that will perform well, not to mention keep the geometry in line. Additionally, it will cost you a crap ton to update all that needs updating, and then you will still have a relatively short travel bike with a v-brake or cantilever brake (at least on the rear brake). The rear wheel is a seven speed (may even have a freewheel instead of a freehub - not positive) drivetrain. If you do use a v-brake on the rear wheel, I would advise getting one of those horseshoe looking braces or your seat stays will spread as you apply the power to the v-brakes. You also have not only the 1" head tube, it comes with a threaded headset. Basically, you'll be replacing almost every part on the bike, and it won't be as good as what you could have otherwise done with that money with more modern equipment.

    How do I know this?

    I have a 1996 GT Outpost. The only original parts left on it are the frame, and the front derailleur.

    That is exactly the advice I needed, thanks Jeff. Looks like the GT gets a motor kit and I get a new bike .

Similar Threads

  1. XC vs All Mtn Dilemma!
    By GnarBrahWyo in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-18-2012, 09:49 AM
  2. In a bit of a dilemma
    By dirtnut in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-11-2012, 10:48 AM
  3. More of a dilemma
    By skiahh in forum Videos and POV Cameras
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 12-31-2011, 11:41 AM
  4. Dilemma once again
    By beetle21 in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-22-2011, 09:58 AM
  5. DJ Dilemma
    By Lunchbox362 in forum Urban/DJ/Park
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 01-30-2011, 12:21 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •