1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44

    Got my new bike today and went for a ride!

    It's a Raleigh 2012(13?) Talus 29 comp



    Did 13 miles with it on a railroad bed that gets very narrow and muddy in a few sections, these tires just eat it all up, I had none of the issues I did with my old Schwinn Mesa


    had some shifting issues from from small gears in the back to the largest chain ring in the front, I suppose it needs adjusting, other than that the breaks rubbed a bit in the back, could hear it slightly.

    I hosed it down when I got done and lubed the chain and gears afterwards, I know there's more to keeping the bike clean and lubed so I'm looking to learn more in these forums.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44
    sorry for the double thread post, had a database error and didn't realize I had done that when I refreshed...

  3. #3
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,444
    I'm getting those all day. I thought it was my computer.

    Cool hardtail.
    I like turtles

  4. #4
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,444
    Reroute that front brake cable through the inside of the fork leg.
    I like turtles

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44
    wouldn't that make the cable hit the spokes?

  6. #6
    Captain Climber
    Reputation: Jem7sk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    541
    Be careful hosing it down. You'll get water and grit in your bearings. Use a fine mist. I made that mistake and hopefully will prevent others from doing it. This vid shows how to wash it in the beginning of the vid

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44
    hmm, I hope I didn't do any damage to my bike got me nervous now

  8. #8
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,444
    No. It won't get caught in the spokes. Zip tie it to the fork leg and to the arch in the spot it is now. You want to protect it from getting caught on anything and getting ruined.
    I like turtles

  9. #9
    Captain Climber
    Reputation: Jem7sk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    541
    You should be ok... I had to take my hubs and headset apart to regrease the bearings. All is fine now. But I did multiple washes first.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    No. It won't get caught in the spokes. Zip tie it to the fork leg and to the arch in the spot it is now. You want to protect it from getting caught on anything and getting ruined.
    I think I know what your saying and I will do this, would be a good idea and something I didn't think of when I rode it today, thank you. I'll post a pic when I'm done

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by Jem7sk View Post
    You should be ok... I had to take my hubs and headset apart to regrease the bearings. All is fine now. But I did multiple washes first.
    I'm going to watch this and a couple other videos I found, I was looking at cleanign kits on amazon, like this one...Amazon.com: Finish Line Pro Care Bucket Kit 6.0 Essentials of Bicycle Care: Sports & Outdoors

    Any idea if this might be worthwhile or should I get simple green and the tools described in this person's video maybe?

    How to clean a bicycle in about 15 minutes - YouTube

    This also does look super useful...
    Finish Line Chain Cleaner Kit > Accessories > Shop Supplies > Lubricant | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    131
    Nice ride, man! What's with the chain stay designs? Do they angle down from the rear hub to lower the bottom bracket height?

  13. #13
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,444
    When I wash my bike, I use the Finish Line bike wash spray. I wet the whole thing, scrub it with a soft brush and rinse off with a light mist of water.
    The Finish Line isn't really a soap. It chemically breaks the bond that causes dirt to stick.
    You could actually use a bug sprayer with water instead of a hose.
    I like turtles

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,049
    Often most dirt can be removed with a hand towel when dry. No need to use water as a spray.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,527
    20+ years of hosing my bikes down and never, ever have had a single solitary issue from it. And a lot of my bikes have been high end full suspension rigs that had been thrashed through acres of mud. I know scores and scores of long-time riders, and not a single one thinks twice about hosing their bikes off, and not a one would waste money on 'special' cleaners or waxes.

    People get WAY too anal about cleaning their bikes. It's not a show car, it's a mtn bike. Ride it hard, put it away wet. It can handle it fine. Most of the dirt will fall off by itself in the first mile of the next ride. Give it a good cleaning a couple times a season if you feel you have to, but don't put another second's thought into thinking you need to jump through any special hoops or need anything to clean it but plain old water and a brush to knock off the bigger clumps. And for the love of god, don't think you really need to wax or polish or even clean anything but the drivetrain, ever. You don't. You can if you want to spend your time that way, but you don't have to. Better to take it out and just ride it. In the off-season, get some beer and give everything a re-pack and grease, then forget about it till next year unless it screams for attention.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    454
    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    20+ years of hosing my bikes down and never, ever have had a single solitary issue from it. And a lot of my bikes have been high end full suspension rigs that had been thrashed through acres of mud. I know scores and scores of long-time riders, and not a single one thinks twice about hosing their bikes off, and not a one would waste money on 'special' cleaners or waxes.

    People get WAY too anal about cleaning their bikes. It's not a show car, it's a mtn bike. Ride it hard, put it away wet. It can handle it fine. Most of the dirt will fall off by itself in the first mile of the next ride. Give it a good cleaning a couple times a season if you feel you have to, but don't put another second's thought into thinking you need to jump through any special hoops or need anything to clean it but plain old water and a brush to knock off the bigger clumps. And for the love of god, don't think you really need to wax or polish or even clean anything but the drivetrain, ever. You don't. You can if you want to spend your time that way, but you don't have to. Better to take it out and just ride it. In the off-season, get some beer and give everything a re-pack and grease, then forget about it till next year unless it screams for attention.

    true.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    20+ years of hosing my bikes down and never, ever have had a single solitary issue from it. And a lot of my bikes have been high end full suspension rigs that had been thrashed through acres of mud. I know scores and scores of long-time riders, and not a single one thinks twice about hosing their bikes off, and not a one would waste money on 'special' cleaners or waxes.

    People get WAY too anal about cleaning their bikes. It's not a show car, it's a mtn bike. Ride it hard, put it away wet. It can handle it fine. Most of the dirt will fall off by itself in the first mile of the next ride. Give it a good cleaning a couple times a season if you feel you have to, but don't put another second's thought into thinking you need to jump through any special hoops or need anything to clean it but plain old water and a brush to knock off the bigger clumps. And for the love of god, don't think you really need to wax or polish or even clean anything but the drivetrain, ever. You don't. You can if you want to spend your time that way, but you don't have to. Better to take it out and just ride it. In the off-season, get some beer and give everything a re-pack and grease, then forget about it till next year unless it screams for attention.
    This is probably good for me to hear before I do get too OCD about it, I have a tendency to do that. I want to keep the drive train in good condition though so I thinkn I will be hosing down after my rides, doesn't take long

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by prashant kasajoo View Post
    ur bike looks awesome ,i am a beginner in bikes,hope to learn from u guys
    Thatnk you, I am pretty proud of it.


    Also, doea anyone have any thoughts on the small issues I mentioned in my first post? The shifting and rubbing sound of likely brakes in the rear.

  19. #19
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,444
    Maybe the caliper needs to centered over the rotor. Basically, you slightly loosen the two caliper bolts, squeeze the lever and tighten the bolts while holding the lever. I bet there's videos on Youtube.
    It would take me an entire page on adjusting the rear shifter cable. What kind of shifter and derailleur do you have and what is it doing?
    I like turtles

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,527
    Quote Originally Posted by Geohound View Post
    This is probably good for me to hear before I do get too OCD about it, I have a tendency to do that. I want to keep the drive train in good condition though so I thinkn I will be hosing down after my rides, doesn't take long
    As long as you keep the drivetrain reasonably clear of grit and lube it somewhat regularly, things should be fine. Couple drops of tri-flow into the shifter cables once in awhile helps too (sure you can find a vid on lubing cables). Some people do get obsessive about cleaning their bikes, and that's all up to them of course, but don't fall under the impression it's some sort of complicated or mandatory thing. IMO, a dirty bike is a happy bike.

    As for your shifting issues, since you say it's the small (high) cogs in back and the large (high) chainring in front, and your bike is new, let me take a stab and guess that your cables have stretched and housings compressed slightly. This is always the case with new cables/housings; it's a break-in thing; once you get a few rides on them, it's done. Most likely you can take care of it by giving the barrel adjusters on your handlebar shifters a couple of turns 'out'. This takes up the 'new' slack in the cable and you should be good to go for awhile. Though are are a million possible causes for poor shifting, I'm thinking this might take care of yours.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by akaHector View Post
    Nice ride, man! What's with the chain stay designs? Do they angle down from the rear hub to lower the bottom bracket height?
    Yes, just about, even after they sharply angel down to that height, they have a slight angle along them to the rear hub...Took me a bit then I recalled the mechanic at the shop telling me it was a good design because it made it quieter, honestly I'm not sure why but I think it had something to do with the chain slapping up against it

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    Maybe the caliper needs to centered over the rotor. Basically, you slightly loosen the two caliper bolts, squeeze the lever and tighten the bolts while holding the lever. I bet there's videos on Youtube.
    It would take me an entire page on adjusting the rear shifter cable. What kind of shifter and derailleur do you have and what is it doing?
    I will look up some videos on it soon, maybe tomorrow after I get done riding, I'm not sure I noticed the sound today when I was on it actually....

    As for the Drive train, it's pure SRAM X5 - I don't know a lot about it besides that it's probably better than X3 and it's a 9 and 3 speed, I wanted to better know what was going on with the shifting so after I got done riding it today I rolled around the parking lot shifting up and down in a few different patterns. other than some shifting in the middle of both gears that left me with some noise, when I had the back on the smallest ring (highest gear?) and attempted to shift the front from the middle to the largest ring, it simply couldn't do it well, or not at all if I wasn't pedaling fast enough. This concerns me but I'm assuming it's either some sort of breaking period or some adjustments. I wasn't happy to find that the act of the chain trying to catch on the top rings in the front scratched up the inside of the top ring but I guess these things are going to happen....newness hasn't worn off yet, bothers me...

    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    As long as you keep the drivetrain reasonably clear of grit and lube it somewhat regularly, things should be fine. Couple drops of tri-flow into the shifter cables once in awhile helps too (sure you can find a vid on lubing cables). Some people do get obsessive about cleaning their bikes, and that's all up to them of course, but don't fall under the impression it's some sort of complicated or mandatory thing. IMO, a dirty bike is a happy bike.


    As for your shifting issues, since you say it's the small (high) cogs in back and the large (high) chainring in front, and your bike is new, let me take a stab and guess that your cables have stretched and housings compressed slightly. This is always the case with new cables/housings; it's a break-in thing; once you get a few rides on them, it's done. Most likely you can take care of it by giving the barrel adjusters on your handlebar shifters a couple of turns 'out'. This takes up the 'new' slack in the cable and you should be good to go for awhile. Though are are a million possible causes for poor shifting, I'm thinking this might take care of yours.
    Quite happy to entered this thread and lent me that perspective, I think I'm going to clean the bike once every couple of weeks, maybe once a month when I bring it in for a tune-up or eventually learn how to tune it up myself. Seems like a good number of tools are involved and maybe that's an extra cost I'm not willing to take on just yet

    I do want to believe that's the case with my shifting and will take what you said into consideration. The mechanic seem a bit fast with adjustments even though he did give me a fair amount of attention when I made it understood that I was buying that day, so maybe I'm wrong there, or he's just good at what he does.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sgtjim57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    455
    Shifting? You said big ring front small ring back? Should not be an issue. May have to adjust the stops or get a mech to do it for you. Big ring to big ring, to much angle same as small ring to small ring. The chain angle on the sprockets is just at such an angle its not a smooth ride. You tube videos can be a great help adjusting stops, I've used them and many other you tube videos on mountain biking. Enjoy, good looking bike too.
    2013 Specialized Carbon Camber Pro 29er (Warranty frame and other stuff)
    2011 Specialized Stumpjumper Comp 29er

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    44
    Alright, new territory as you know but I'm already learning a lot from here and youtube, just need tools (little pricey but probably worth it). Thank you for the compliment - rides well thus far, I'm having a lot of fun blasting over terrain that would have tripped me up before

Similar Threads

  1. is there anyone who DIDN'T ride today?
    By GuruAtma in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 76
    Last Post: 01-14-2012, 08:52 PM
  2. Anyone ride a fat bike in colo springs today?
    By pcoady in forum Fat Bikes
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-24-2011, 09:19 PM
  3. We taught a neighborhood kid how to ride a bike today.
    By marpilli in forum Families and Riding with Kids
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-29-2011, 07:03 PM
  4. Anyone have a bad ride today?
    By M-U-M in forum North & South Carolina
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 04-25-2011, 06:55 AM
  5. Where to ride today?
    By ECEGatorTuro in forum Oregon
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-20-2011, 11:47 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •