1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Got me a Rockhopper

    Well after about a week of research I went to the LBS and took the plunge on a Rockhopper Comp Disc. I haven't ridden a bike in 10+ years and the last mtb I had was a Huffy It's a nice bike. Shifts smooth and I can't believe how light bikes are these days.

    Like many others, I'm sure, I am just going to be building up my endurance again. The main reason I bought a bike was to get back in shape, but have fun doing it. I rode for about an hour last night and I was BEAT! I'm 24, 5'11", 165 lbs. 19" bike was a perfect fit.

    The bike fits in my 2005 Mini cooper if I take both wheels off and put the passenger seat forward. Have to do it that way untul I can afford a Mini Fini bike rack.

    I was going to buy a Ibex Alpine 550 but being able to test drive a few bikes in my price range was important for this first time back.

    I love the color. I'll get back with a more in depth review after a month or so of ownership.



    Seat has to go. My back end was not made for this thing.






    Yes, it would seem both my animals love it too.

  2. #2
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    Congrats!
    You made a good decision by getting that bike. you won't regret it. Give the seat another ride before you toss it since its brand new and the foam hasn't really broken in yet.
    The more your ride the more you'll feel like you can go farther.
    Just a few things...
    the quick release lever on the front wheel should either be facing up or back so it doesn't snag something and you really shouldn't be in that gear combination. its called cross chainging because the chain has to go from the inside on the front to the outside on the rear. the same goes for the big gear on the front and the easiest gear in the back. thoes combinations can cause the chain and gears to wear out faster.

    other than that just be sure to take the bike back to the bike shop after 2 to 3 months so they can check it. most reputable shops offer free adjustments for a year so make sure to take advantage of it. even if everything feels good bring it back just to make sure everything is breaking in properly.

  3. #3
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    double post

  4. #4
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    Well I feel like an ass I was just reading about cross-chaining yesterday. I guess I was too excited notice. I didn't ride in that combo very long thouhg as I was paying attention when I first got out there.. lol.

    And the quick release.. I swear I was just looking at that and thinking it didn't look right.. lol.

    I bought it at a place here in the Washington DC area called Spokes Etc. They do offer 1 year tuneups. My goal is to be able to do most of those things on my own just like I work on my cars and computers.

    I'll give the seat another try.

    Thanks,
    Kirk

  5. #5
    Go Lakers!
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  6. #6
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    You have done well choosing this bike. It looks great and is awesome!

    I just bought a RH too and want to learn how to maintain the bike myself. Keep in mind that for now just ride until you wear things out, then replace with higher components if you can. I will make use of the LBS, as the service is free and you could get lots of info from them.

    Enjoy!

  7. #7
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    Nice lookin' bike!

  8. #8
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    Yikes, I only made it about 20 minutes today. It was mostly uphill but wow I am out of shape. My ass is sore as hell so I stayed off the seat as much as possible. I guess I need to take it easy before I'll start seeing some improvements.

  9. #9
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    Great looking bike!

    Ride hard

  10. #10
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    Great looking bike!

    Ride hard

  11. #11
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    The QR lever on the front wheel seems to be on the wrong side. It should usually be on the disc side. Dont worry for the saddle, as your behind gets use to it, the seat will get softer, in a couple of days it should be way more comfortable. Nice bike, better then what i bought when i got back to bikes.

  12. #12
    Go Lakers!
    Reputation: Sambolina's Avatar
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    When I started, everything was tough. Just keep ridin and pushing yourself each time. It will get easier... My suggestion is push yourself harder each time you ride. Breaks are always good and as you get stronger you will not need as many.

  13. #13
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    Your butt is going to hurt until your break your seat and yourself in. Grab yourself some padded cycling shorts and you'll amazed at the difference.

  14. #14
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    Awesome bike. My LBS has one of those in stock, and it looked so nice "in the flesh" that I almost bought myself a new one just to have a new one, and with disk brakes. But I already have a two-year-old Rockhopper that's blue.

    I second the advice to give the seat a little while before you replace it. That style of bike seat won't really feel comfortable until you've gotten a bit more used to riding. And then it will (hopefully!) get comfortable.

    Don't stress about the hills either. There's one long and steep hill by my house that I still have to stop and rest on three or four times as I go up. But I am persistent, and once I make it to the top it's doggone fun to come down the other side. And there are a lot of lesser hills that I can get up in one go that I couldn't get up without stopping on a couple of years ago. So it all gets better, and that's good.

  15. #15
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    Awesome bike. My LBS has one of those in stock, and it looked so nice "in the flesh" that I almost bought myself a new one just to have a new one, and with disk brakes. But I already have a two-year-old Rockhopper that's blue.

    I second the advice to give the seat a little while before you replace it. That style of bike seat won't really feel comfortable until you've gotten a bit more used to riding. And then it will (hopefully!) get comfortable.

    Don't stress about the hills either. There's one long and steep hill by my house that I still have to stop and rest on three or four times as I go up. But I am persistent, and once I make it to the top it's doggone fun to come down the other side. And there are a lot of lesser hills that I can get up in one go that I couldn't get up without stopping on a couple of years ago. So it all gets better, and that's good.

  16. #16
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    Is that stem stock?

    You might consider replacing with a gel cushion if the seat continues to stay uncomfortable- but keep the seat for future use!

  17. #17
    STINKY TOFU
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    I know just how you feel, I just started riding myself last month
    First ride: 30mins, sweat soaked through entire shirt. Had to stop 3times. So out of breath couldnt say my own name. Thought I was having a stroke

    Month and a half later: 2hrs. Stopped twice, but not so out of breath and the heart attack feeling replaced by burning in legs.

  18. #18
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    Nice bike. I just picked up a RH myself.

    Ive been to Spokes etc as well... (Ashburn?)

  19. #19
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    question about the QR lever. I read somewhere that even though th elever usually come by default on the disc side it would be a good idea to switch it to the other side in case after a ride when your trying to undo it you leas likely to touch a hot rotor. Is there a bad thing that might happen if the levers on the opposite side?

  20. #20
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    I don't see why it matters what side the lever is on...as long as it is in a place that won't possibly hook a limb or vine...and as long as it is tight enough to hold the tire on...
    "Havin' a good time, here today...Watching the sun shine, matinee...Never the wrong time, time we stay...Living the moontime, time we play"

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by PanicFan77
    I don't see why it matters what side the lever is on...as long as it is in a place that won't possibly hook a limb or vine...and as long as it is tight enough to hold the tire on...
    Bearings seat in a particular direction and if you're constantly swapping they may wear a bit faster

    Also some tires are directional, and furthermore your brake pads wear closely to fit your rim profile over time - swap that around and your brakes will constantly be re-grinding themselves down to best fit the little curves in your rim

    OP, if that's a Tora shock, I think you can get a little thing called a "Poploc" control - just a toggle switch on your handlebars, when you flip it your shock locks out (acts like a hard fork) so you don't burn energy pumping your shock climbing hills. Should be 30 beans or so, and will be a nice upgrade, especially if you find yourself commuting or hill climbing.

  22. #22
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    Nice bike! I got the cheaper Rockhopper disc a week or so ago and I love it. I was seriously considering the pro because of the nicer brakes and shifters mainly, but the LBS didn't have the red pro, so that made my decision easier. I figure a $600 bike will be good enough for a first bike for me.

  23. #23
    Muhuhahaha
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    The pics don't see them, but I have a RH too. Love it. Get some clipless pedals and you will be in heaven on the up hills. I can go on up hills with no problem now cause the extra energy in pedeling.

  24. #24
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    Nice Bike! (I just bought the same RH Comp last night, gray and black though)
    I agree about the seat, but I guess I'll give it some time to break in (after 2 hours of riding last night, lets just say my desk is not as comfortable as usual)
    Also, about the lockout mentioned above, its on top of your right fork; underneath the shock is a rebound adjuster (haven't got a chance to play with it yet as I found it when I got home from riding)

  25. #25
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    I have a newer RH as well and had the same problem as you are having with the seat. Give it time, it took me about 2 weeks to get my seat broken in and my riding position adjusted properly. I found that moving the seat back on the rails and slightly tilting the front of it helped tremendously. The stock saddle is acutally really comfortable once broken in. I am not sure who makes them but they seem to be a decent saddle.

    If you get tired of dealing with it go out and get some padded shorts. I wish I would have bought them long before I did, it would have saved me from a lot of pain and suffering.

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