1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Good Forks for a freeride/all mountain beginner

    I have just bought an Orange Sub Zero (2007) frame and would like some recommendations on which forks to buy. I have been looking at the Marzocchi Z1 Sports as they are quite good value but do not know if it is worth buying possibly some Fox 36s, Marzocchi 66s, Rockshox Lyrik etc. Has anyone tried any of these? Manufacturer recommendation is a fork with around 140 - 180 mm of travel.
    Many Thanks
    Laurie

  2. #2
    spec4life???..smh...
    Reputation: spec4life's Avatar
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    Check out the reveiw section they usually will give you a good idea as to the quality of the product. I always look at the reveiw first on anything i get for my bike, pay close attention to what people didt like about it,

    Heres the 08 fork reveiws

    http://www.mtbr.com/cat/suspension/2...S_1565crx.aspx

  3. #3
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    I think the rock shox boxxers are good for freeride/downhill. i'm not sure how much they cost though

  4. #4
    Flying Goat
    Reputation: mrpercussive's Avatar
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    Definitely look into the Lyrik... Rockshox has definitely got it down with their damping systems this time around with both the Motion Control and the Mission Control... The Lyrik would be a good fork for that HT of yours... if you want a bigger fork, check out the Totems...

  5. #5
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    I run a Marzocchi 66 ATA. As they have fixed the 'wind down' issue I can recommend that fork. Easy to setup and very sup. Works great for me. Range is 140 to 180. I run DHs on it on 180 and dropped it +7' (not calculating transition). Also did dome DJ with it. Seems to be a great FR fork.

    I also run a Fox 36 Talas. Range is 130 to 160. I am using this for XC as I love gnarly descends. I might not use it to its full potential as I stay away from the big drops with that bike. Probably did 3' max (again - not including the trani). But I can climb up about everywhere anybody else can... and I am fast on the technical descends. But again - I never used it for serios DH like double blacks in resorts.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

  6. #6
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    Rock Shox Domain 318 is a great fork for about $500. It has many adjustments, compression, rebound, 100-170mm travel adj. Its a little heavy at 6.5 lbs, but great bang for the buck.
    2013 Transition TransAM 29er
    2011 Yeti 303R DH
    2012 Banshee Spitfire V1.5

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