1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Good Deal for Old/New bike? Ventana "El Habanero

    Hello,

    I am contemplating on getting a bike from a co-worker. It's a Ventana El Habanero. I used to ride a long time ago and I want to get back into it. Below is the description he gave me. I don't know crap about Mountain bikes so... He has offered to sell me for $800 and he also said if he takes off the front forks and head set, he'll bring it down to $500. Good Deal?

    Here is what he sent me :

    "The complete bike is a Ventana El Habanero. I think I got it in 1996-1997. It's a pretty rare bike, and in some cases collectible due to it being a classic Ventana (Sherwood Gibson is the founder of Ventana, and this is a hand-built frame by him). It's an all-aluminum frame. I had it custom-painted in 2003 with a metallic blue and black with silver tribal art. That bike is a full-suspension bike that has 3.5 inches of rear travel. The way I built it up is pretty light considering how old it is. I weighed it and it was 26.4 lbs with that 4" travel Rock Shock SID race fork. It's pretty tricked out with XTR/XT/Chris King/Rolf and a bunch of Carbon Fiber parts to keep the weight down. It's a great compromise between hard-tail efficiency and full-suspension plush. There's enough travel on the rear to take the edge off trails. This bike is all complete, just need to get the cabling re-adjusted as it hasn't been used in a couple of years. probably good to have it lubricated too."

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    Hmm, 1996-1997 means this bike is 10 years old, which could mean its frame is nearing the end of its lifetime.

    I'm going to have to say no just because its really old, really, really old.

  3. #3
    hardcore on the bunnyhill
    Reputation: emvath's Avatar
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    Mar 2004
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    I agree. While it would have been a great bike back in its day, most frames just aren't made to last for over 10 years. Unless it has been garaged for the past decade, I'd be hesitant to trust that frame. Not to mention that suspension, brakes, drivetrain components, and even frames themselves have made monumental improvements in the last 10 years!

    Whether it is worth the price as a collectors item....I dunno I don't get into that stuff.
    Mr.Burns: Quick Smithers, bring me the mind eraser device!
    Smithers: You mean the revolver, sir?
    Mr.Burns: Precisely.

  4. #4
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
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    Jan 2005
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    I'll agree it's not worth what he's asking, $800. 4 years ago I sold a Marin Team Issue all pimped out & was owned by a top pro DH'er for $400 because that's all it was worth.

    Check out a Ibex Ignition if you can wait till Feb or Mar.

    http://www.ibexbikes.com/Bikes/IGN-3-Details.html

    Formotion Products
    http://www.formot

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