1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    9

    Going to get my first mountain bike Stache 8 - had questions.

    I am male, 42, 200 pounds and 5 foot 9 inches.

    size available is 17.5 or 19 inches.

    I generally feel more comfortable with the smaller size, but Ive read on some forums that no matter what if you borderline go with the 19 inch. For what reason I dont know???

    any logic or reasoning behind this??

    Also how does this bike hande on roads? is it comfortable like a full suspension bike?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,771
    You should get what feels right to you. The more important measurement is the top tube leagth ,not too long and not too short.I've ridden both I like a smaller frame more often. Take it for a test ride and see for yourself ,you are the riding it no one else knows how it feels to you.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    9
    Ranger, thanks for your advice. Cheers.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,210
    The 19 is way too big.
    Even the 17.5 might be big.
    I'm 6' 1" and ride a 19 or 19.5.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StuntmanMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    573
    I'm 5'9, 170, and I ride a 17.5" Trek 6000 26'er. Not sure what the Stache frame looks like, but for me, that 17.5 is PERFECT on my 6000. I think anything larger would be too big to ride comfortably.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,178
    another 5'9" here.

    Would never ride a 19" frame - 17 feels right w a 31" inseam for me.

    r

  7. #7
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,820
    Quote Originally Posted by oncdoc View Post
    Also how does this bike hande on roads? is it comfortable like a full suspension bike?

    A hardtail is comfortable on roads, but a hardtail isn't a replacement for full suspension. And I wouldn't worry about having a full suspension for road riding. That said, the Stache 8 does have some 'compliance' built into it and the front fork has 120mm travel, so it won't beat on you as hard as some super stiff frames will, but it isn't ever going to be mistaken for a full suspension bike.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,886
    I think the Stache would handle like a tank on roads. ok for short, low-speed rides, but it's really going to be at home on dirt. you could get a second set of slick tires for it for the occasional pavement ride, but if you want to spend a lot of time on the tarmac, that's the wrong bike.

    are you asking if a full-suspension bike is comfortable on roads? yes, but at the cost of efficiency. it would be like going jogging with huge foam pads strapped to your feet. comfy, yes. but slow as hell. FS bikes are not necessarily supposed to be "comfortable." they are supposed to be stable because they soak up bumps and keep your tires on the ground instead of bouncing off things. you should not need to worry about your tires bouncing off things on the road, unless you live in Africa or something.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    9
    Thanks guys for your help. I will keep trying different bikes. Appreciate it. Im looking fwd to getting back into shape !!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    9
    Thinking about it, then, maybe, today I should go test bike, some of the Fuel trek bikes. They are FS and still good on the dirt right? If so is the entry level one good enough for a first time buyer and biker?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,886
    The Trek Fuel line are great bikes! these have been long considered one of the best all-around mountain bikes. great value, good design, reliable.

    Fuels, along with any other FS bike, are definitely most at-home on dirt. riding one for a long distance on pavement would be... a great work out. it would be like running a marathon in combat boots. but it would certainly burn calories! but if you want to enjoy riding long miles on pavement, and as a result do more of it, you should look into a pavement-oriented bike. it's really hard to find a bike that does pavement and dirt both well. it's always going to be a compromise if you want to do both. I would err on the side of whatever you think you are going to do more of.

  12. #12
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,820
    What exactly are you planning on doing with this bike? I feel like the target is moving around here and it's not really clear what the intended use would be.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,886
    good question Jeff.

    OP- approximately what percentage of your riding time do you hope to spend on dirt, and what percentage on pavement? the Stache and Fuel bikes would be great if you are spending more than 75% of your time on dirt. if you want more pavement time, those bikes will be clunky.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    9
    75 percent of the time pavement and 25 percent dirt. Guess wanted to get the best of both worlds.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,886
    how aggressive to do you plan to get on dirt? if you're just riding dirt roads and paths, something more like a Trek DS line or Crossrip would be better. even an FX bike with some bigger tires for some smooth trails would work. suspension is heavy and cheap suspension is VERY heavy and unnecessary on pavement unless you're a senior citizen with mad arthritis.

    look up "Gravel Grinder," "Monster Cross," or "Adventure" bikes. the Trek Crossrip, Surly Crosscheck, and Salsa Fargo come to mind.

    a FS bike or trail hartail like the Stache for 75% pavement riding is just going to be heavy and slow and waste dollars you could have spent on accessories like a bike rack, riding shorts, hydration, a nicer helmet, etc.

  16. #16
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,820
    Initially, logic may suggest that you should look at bikes that would favor paved riding. OTOH, if you are using the bike for utilitarian purposes, but really want to spend some time riding true trails without significant compromise, this might be worth some additional consideration. IMO, riding a road oriented bike on trails is more of a compromise than riding a trail bike on the road. If you just want to ride relatively tame dirt, and spend 75% riding with little compromise for your road riding, then something closer to a hybrid, or maybe a cyclocross/gravel grinder would be worthy of consideration.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    9
    thank you for the response. Ive decided try later today the lower cost bike like the trek DS 8.1 and in future, if needed step up to the Stache or something like that later if I get into dirt and rocks more !! cheers ! thanks again for help

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,886
    somewhere across the universe, mine and Jeff's thoughts collided in the ether and we typed almost the exact same thing at the same time.

  19. #19
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,820
    For $30 more than the 8.1, you could get a suspension fork with the 8.2. That is probably the right type of bike to get you rolling and see how much you favor one type of riding or another.

Similar Threads

  1. NEED HELPING PICKING A BIKE evo or stache
    By THOWEDMODE2323 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-28-2013, 05:39 AM
  2. Moving from Mountain to Cx, bike questions....
    By haymitch in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-13-2012, 09:07 AM
  3. Questions about getting a New Mountain Bike
    By captainfishhook in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-20-2012, 02:10 PM
  4. '82-'85 Mountain bike sizing questions
    By deoreo in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-26-2011, 02:43 PM
  5. new to mountain bike,acquired a vintage,now some questions
    By bderlan in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-12-2011, 07:42 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •