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Thread: Goatheads!

  1. #1
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    Goatheads!

    Just got a new mountain bike for 2 weeks now, and I've already got 2 flats, back to back!

    What are some of the better solutions out there? From thorn resistant tubes to tire liners, to converting to tubeless. I believe my tires and wheels are tubeless ready. The tires for sure since it has a label that says so.

    What are your experiences with them? What do you prefer?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Going tubeless is probably the best thing i ever did for my bike, but it adds a whole new set of problems.

    For a newbie, i'd just put some slime/sealant in your tubes and enjoy the ride. If you have schrader valves can remove the core and install sealant. If you have presta valves you'll need to buy tubes that already have the sealant in them.
    Blur LT & Highball

  3. #3
    T.W.O.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porch View Post
    Going tubeless is probably the best thing i ever did for my bike, but it adds a whole new set of problems.

    For a newbie, i'd just put some slime/sealant in your tubes and enjoy the ride. If you have schrader valves can remove the core and install sealant. If you have presta valves you'll need to buy tubes that already have the sealant in them.
    ^^^This.

    Nothing would stop the leakage like tubeless sealant. I like Stans Notube. It's counter-intuitive, if you run over a few, when you pull it out, just keep on riding the tire rotation and the sealant inside would take care of the rest.

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    I do have one trick from my road bike. Basically I bought tubes with removable presta valves and fill about half of the small bottle of stan's tubeless sealant. However I can't find any 29er tubes with removable presta valves.

    For now I may try to inject them into my current valves with the large syringe, hopefully it wont seal up the valves.

  5. #5
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    If they are pinch flats, you can run more pressure. Running tubeless will help regardless of pinch flats or thorns. I run my bikes tubeless and would never go back.

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    Quote Originally Posted by capnron View Post
    I do have one trick from my road bike. Basically I bought tubes with removable presta valves and fill about half of the small bottle of stan's tubeless sealant. However I can't find any 29er tubes with removable presta valves.

    For now I may try to inject them into my current valves with the large syringe, hopefully it wont seal up the valves.
    I picked up some specialized tubes a few weeks ago that had removable cores. Then again, they already had sealant in them too...
    Blur LT & Highball

  7. #7
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    Quick google search turned up these. They aren't self-sealing though, just have removable cores, despite the link saying it.

    Self Sealing Inner Tubes - Presta Valve

    You can also use 26er tubes with the same width as what you need in 29er. Tubes stretch well in circumference just not volume.
    Stay aware of those who hide in plain sight.

  8. #8
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    you can add sealant to any presta tube. it's a pain in the butt, but it can be done. it's no substitute for tubeless, but it should help for thorns at least. I never had much luck with Slime but Stan's or Cafe Latex might be worth a shot. Or try Orange Seal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by capnron View Post
    I do have one trick from my road bike. Basically I bought tubes with removable presta valves and fill about half of the small bottle of stan's tubeless sealant. However I can't find any 29er tubes with removable presta valves.

    For now I may try to inject them into my current valves with the large syringe, hopefully it wont seal up the valves.
    Q-tubes (QBPs brand), Sunlite (J&B brand), and Contis should all have removable cores.

    Stans' will not go through a presta, Cafe Latex will.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by capnron View Post
    I do have one trick from my road bike. Basically I bought tubes with removable presta valves and fill about half of the small bottle of stan's tubeless sealant. However I can't find any 29er tubes with removable presta valves.

    For now I may try to inject them into my current valves with the large syringe, hopefully it wont seal up the valves.
    Stan's? Retail at $7.99 for a pair

  11. #11
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    As for the subject... Go tubeless and your issue will be resolved. Just make sure you go with a proper set up.

  12. #12
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    slime tubes and tire liners solved my problem.. and I have a ton of goatheads
    Rockhopper 29er

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  13. #13
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    I haven't had a goathead ever since I identified how and where they like to grow. They like to hug the ground, usually by the edge of pavement. Found some along my route to the trails, where I ignorantly playfully rode through. I just go around them now. Take a good note of how it looks and look for it near where you ride. You won't forget it, unless you don't see it for a few years, but the precautions learned stick (don't ride too close to the edge of the pavement if it doesn't look well groomed).



    As for sealant, I hate flats, so I find it worth the cost and trouble. I attempt tubeless, but I also found sealant in regular tubes worked decently enough to prevent minor punctures (not pinch flats). I'm switching from Stan's to Continental Revo. Stan's altered their formula a bit over the years, but still has issues about drying up into annoying "stanimals" that bounce around making noise in your tires. The 1 liter size is about the same amount as Stan's 32 oz size, but costs a bit less. Not sure if takes less or more per tire, nor how long it lasts, but I heard some others saying they made the switch permanent after trying it.

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    I used to live in TX where Goatheads were everywhere.

    I did the Slime. You will be surprised that I get a soaked inner tube and flat too. If you add the strip, it makes it heavier.

    I went with Stans. Love it and 2 yrs of riding, no flats/punctures. Highly recommend Stans NoTubes

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    How much slime goes into a 26 x 2.125 tube?

  16. #16
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    I have Presta tubes with slime on my Trek and slime isn't a magical you never get a flat.. I rode out at Wilson Lake last month and the trail happened to be littered with thorns of various sizes - I picked 40 thorns out of one tire alone and stopped there and went and bought new tires - so many of those buggers.

    Slime didn't do much for that situation - Also depends on the thickness of the thorn, a big humongous one probalby would still flat you on slime tubes.

    Until last month, been years since I had a flat.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  17. #17
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    One other trick for putting sealant in a presta tube w/o a removable valve core is to just make a small cut in the tube, inject the sealant, and patch it with a proper glue-on patch. At least look into going tubeless...its not that big of a deal or particularly hard to do. Some shops will do it..some won't. Just takes some time to learn how to do it and of course...patience if you are just learning. The ease of a tubeless set up really comes down to which rims/tires you have, your patience level, and your overall bike-working-on skill!
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    At least look into going tubeless...its not that big of a deal or particularly hard to do.
    +1
    I had the slime, it is never full proof and I still have like 90% of that stuff in my garage. Went for 3 rides with slime and had a flat. It was no fun hiking 1.5 miles home.

    Tubeless = Stans NoTubes!!!

  19. #19
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    I kept getting pinch flats and picked up stans tubeless valves and two 2oz things of stans for like 13 bucks. Figured I would see if I could make it work and I had my bike tubeless in 30 minutes without knowing a thing befor I started. Just put the valves in tight, apply sealant, and applied some soapy water to the tire bead and added air. it was that simple. I had great luck maybe, every one said you needed tubeless wheels but I have 100 plus miles on technical single track now without a issue.

  20. #20
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    +1
    Converting tube rims to tubeless. Can be done

  21. #21
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    Also, don't pick the things sticking into your tire out unless you mean to do the repairs there and then. The things stuck in the tire/tube also plug the hole they created, and limit air loss.

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    Stans should be able to handle goat heads but, I learned it the hard way with a big thorn and slime. Pulled it out and the slime was squirting out....

  23. #23
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    Green Slime may not be a good solution. Maybe Stan's is good? I live in China and I used some similar stuff that they put in ebike tires. Works great, but it dries up after a year or so and forms a clod. Well worth it though considering the alternatives. I had horrible goathead problems where I used to live but the Chinese slime stuff fixed that.

    I have a friend still riding in the same goathead-prone area and he uses thorn resistant tubes. They are thicker and heavier, but they generally do the job. I think he's only had one flat in a few years. Tube protectors are also good. They hardly weigh anything and can stop most but not all thorns. A mixed approach is probably best is a really bad thorn area.

    If you do go with the slime route, be advised that you ALWAYS need to still carry a spare tube. The slime makes patching nearly impossible, and if you get a flat due to the rim then the slime won't help you.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by skewe View Post
    Stans should be able to handle goat heads but, I learned it the hard way with a big thorn and slime. Pulled it out and the slime was squirting out....
    Yea, same with Caffelatex. That stuff just squirts out of thorny punctures. What's worse is if it gets on your clothes, such as in the event you continue riding hoping it would seal as you ride, it dries into a stain that looks like some guy blew their load on ya (*censored* TMI maybe).

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