1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: maxxdout's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    93

    Giving Managers Bike a Tune-up

    My manager asked if I could tune his bike up for a few bucks (I should have said I'll do it for free if he gives me a raise, ha!) and I accepted the offer. I'm going to pick it up tomorrow and get to work. The thing is, what does a general tune-up include? I'm going to check the tire, brakes, shifting components, suspension components, make sure everything is tight but loose, true the wheels, lube everything, then clean it off good. He says he hasn't rode it in years. It's a Cannondale full suspension bike (not sure what model) and it's still like brand new, so I assume this will be an easy tune-up.

    Is there anything else I should check? Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by maxxdout View Post
    My manager asked if I could tune his bike up for a few bucks (I should have said I'll do it for free if he gives me a raise, ha!) and I accepted the offer. I'm going to pick it up tomorrow and get to work. The thing is, what does a general tune-up include? I'm going to check the tire, brakes, shifting components, suspension components, make sure everything is tight but loose, true the wheels, lube everything, then clean it off good. He says he hasn't rode it in years. It's a Cannondale full suspension bike (not sure what model) and it's still like brand new, so I assume this will be an easy tune-up.

    Is there anything else I should check? Thanks!
    Tight but loose? If the bike was built correctly in the first place the only thing it should need depending on how much he actually rode it would be deraileur adjustment. Also depending on where the bike was stored it could need a new chain and tires/tubes from being stored outside.

    Also if the bolts for the suspension pivots aren't obviously loose don't mess with them they have specific torque specifications so they don't bind or squish the ball bearings. Another thing, you might already know this... When you clean it only wipe it down with windex or something similar, hosing it down will expose the bearings in the suspension to rust.

  3. #3
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,135
    Check derailleur hanger alignment.
    Check / adjust derailleurs
    Check / adjust brakes / inspect pads for wear
    True Wheels
    Check / adjust hubs
    Check / adjust headset
    Check BB for wear / play
    Measure chain wear / lube
    Check all bolts and fasteners
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  4. #4
    Hmmmmm
    Reputation: Ericmopar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,735
    My only tip is clean it first then lube and check everything, not the other way around.
    Cleaning can aid finding cracks etc, plus you don't want dirt getting into hubs or anything else you might take apart to grease and lube.
    "I thought of that while riding my bike."
    Albert Einstein, on the theory of relativity.

    Peace and Long Rides...

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    44
    Tell ya Manager due to you needing a raise at your job your gonna need to borrow some friends tools to do a tune-up for him but you'll get the job done for him. Do a good job and maybe it'll stick in the back of his head and he'll give u a raise in the near future

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: maxxdout's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    93
    Thanks for the tips. I'm sure he stored the bike inside, he claims its like brand new.

    Another thing he asked me: is it possible to convert the presta valve to a schrader?

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,167
    Another thing he asked me: is it possible to convert the presta valve to a schrader?[/QUOTE]

    Is that a question for us? You might want to research this first before asking...Might catch flack since you are taking the bosses life in your hand, liability at least?

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: maxxdout's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    93
    Well yea, he asked me but I told him that he would probably need different rims because of the size of the hole of the valve, but I would look into it. I'll probably end up just giving him one of my presta to schrader adapters (if he doesn't have one already)...

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    15
    Your very brave.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: maxxdout's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    93
    Well it's not the manager of the store, just the department, and he's a cool guy (he claims I'm one of the best in the dept. )

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,167
    Quote Originally Posted by maxxdout View Post
    Well it's not the manager of the store, just the department, and he's a cool guy (he claims I'm one of the best in the dept. )
    You'll get half of what he said he'd pay you and you will get twice the work load...because you are so good...

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,850
    Not sure I'd want to do bike work for my boss. However, I think you're on the right track with what to do.

    Clean and polish the bike well. Throw on some Pedro's Bike Lust. Toothbrush-clean that bike. I detail almost every bike that I work on. Delivering back a clean bike leaves a good impression and sets a very positive tone. Basically, people are superficial. They judge your work by what they can see.

  13. #13
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    4,968
    Quote Originally Posted by maxxdout View Post
    Thanks for the tips. I'm sure he stored the bike inside, he claims its like brand new.

    Another thing he asked me: is it possible to convert the presta valve to a schrader?
    Easy, just drill it. Sheldon says 21/64" drill bit, but I think 11/32" is plenty close enough and I'm not sure how many hardware stores carry 21/64" bits.

    Drill carefully!
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

Similar Threads

  1. Keeping the Peace with the Land Managers
    By DaGoat in forum New Mexico
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-11-2010, 10:17 AM
  2. Land Managers Meeting
    By Mtn. Biker123 in forum New Mexico
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-08-2009, 04:03 PM
  3. Olympics meet the land managers
    By Dave_schuldt in forum Washington
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-14-2008, 06:53 AM
  4. What bike Brand Managers do when we're bored...
    By downhilljill in forum Haro
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-01-2007, 03:54 PM
  5. Paging bike shop owners and/or managers
    By Mellow Yellow in forum Passion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-06-2005, 01:13 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •