1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    GIANT Yukon or something similar...

    Went to my local bike shop in search of my first real bike today.
    The guy showed me a GIANT Yukon for $519.
    From what I've researched, it is a pretty good starter bike. And I liked what I rode.
    But I wanted to know if there is any other brand you would recommend that's similar to the GIANT.
    The guy told me Trek and Specialized are the two other main brands.
    From what I've been reading the Trek 4500 and Specialized Rockhopper are similar to the GIANT, but I wanted to hear your opinions.
    Seems the plus on the GIANT are the disc brakes.

  2. #2
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    I started on a Trek 4300, my GF started on a Giant Yukon. I think all makers have a decent entry-level bike available. Find a place where they take some time to answer questions and mention stuff that you find useful info. If you like the bike shop, you'll probably like the bike.

    Later on when/if you get really hooked and think nothing of spending $2K on a bike, then you can get all wrapped up in the brand. There's only so many component makers, I am always kinda surprised how alike all the 'different' bikes really are.

  3. #3
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    Hey,


    From what I learned the Giants are usually cheaper then the trek and specialized, but from my research it depends on the bike. Giants are usually cheaper because, they are the biggest bike manufacturer (correct me if i am wrong) according to what i have learned, and the make frames for other companies.

    Now looking at the Trek 4500 and the yukon...
    Right away, The fork on the trek is better,

    as for the shifters and der.'s , they seem to have the same.

    the rockhopper is similar to the trek...

    the giant does have discs, but at the $500 bike range, I heard a good set of v-brakes will do the same ( not to mention you save weight)

    but basically at the $500 bike level, it boils down to what fits better for you and what color yo like best


    ~~~ personally I bought a specialized hardrock... two months later got myself a stumpjumer..... worlds a difference, you wont even believe it. Wish i bought it from day one.


    Good Luck

  4. #4
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    I started on, and still have, a Giant Yukon. It's a decent bike. Having discs is a plus, because while the stock ones may be no better than V-Brakes, all the stuff to upgrade to better ones is there (mounts and hubs).

  5. #5
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    Thanks!
    The thing is...I'm so new to this I don't even know what to ask or what to look for.
    I did test drive a Giant yesterday and the first thing I asked about was suspension. I was weird bouncing around while riding on the street. So I guess once I rode it kinda was getting an idea of what to look for, but I'm still a bit clueless.
    The thing I liked about the Giant is that I can buy it at a store close to my apartment, and they offer free tune-ups for life and 10% accessories for the first year. Is that standard?

  6. #6
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    In my experience, which is really limited, free tune-up's for life and 10% accessories is a really good deal.

    As long as they treat you like a good customer even though you are buying an entry level bike. That's the most important because you can feel free to ask all the questions without them "big-leaguing"(sp) you.

    Sounds like you may have a good LBS there in my opinion.

  7. #7
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    Tried out the Giant Yukon, Trek 4300D, and Specialized Hardrock.
    They all pretty much had the same feel.
    I think I'm gonna go with the Giant because I like the LBS that's not too far from my house and the color is better than the other models.
    They have it for $519. Is that good?
    Free tune-ups for life and 10% off accessories for the first year, as well.

  8. #8
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    i'd say if you like the bike, and your excited about it... go for it

  9. #9
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    I dont know if you got the bike, but I had the 08 yukon since april and I love it. Its my first real bike. I dont know if I would need to get anything better, but I am debating if I should slowly upgrade it or not.

  10. #10
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    I've ridden Yukons before, and they are very good bikes to start off with. Theyre a good deal too.

  11. #11
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    i have a 08 yukon,it is my 1st mtb so far the bike is great,my LBS also has free tune 4life,i am about 195lbs and the frok was a little soft,so i had the bike shop put in a heavy duty spring and that made a big difference,i also paid $519.00.

  12. #12
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    a few thoughts...

    FIT is the most important thing, get the bike that feels best for fit...to you.

    2) Disc brakes are a real advantage for control if you ride in wet conditions, or steep terrain. Also, they help resale prices if you move on later. If you decide V's are OK for you, some bikes equip their products with disc-ready hubs, cutting upgrade costs later by a large amount. Get your LBS to check the bikes for you to see if they are disc ready if you think that's a later possibility.

    3) any major manufacturer like Trek, specialized, etc. make excellent rides, pick the one you like best and at the shop you like best.

    Good luck, Jim

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