1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    GF Rangitoto Rebuild?

    Hi, I'm new here and this is my first post. I've browsed the forums and it seems like you have a very nice community here.

    My bro-in-law recently moved to Germany for 3 years and he left me a GF Rangitoto. He said it sat for 5 years or more and some of the chrome parts (handlebars, neck, etc) have some small rust spots. The tires are flat and I think the Tange Struts are shot. I tested the brakes and the shifters and they seem to work okay. I've got a couple of questions:

    -Should I attempt to rebuild the existing fork or go for a new one? I'm thinking to ride this bike both on trails and street. Not sure whether I should go with a suspension fork or a rigid fork if I replace it. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    -The pedals are the type that lock to your shoes. He was originally going to keep the pedals so he packed the shoes and took them to Germany then changed his mind and told me I could keep the pedals so now I need to get some shoes to go with them. Do those kinds of pedals have a standard fitting that I could use any biking shoes with or do I need to match the shoes to the pedals so they lock to them? Are those kinds of pedals even recommended anymore?

    -Anyone know where I can find a digital copy of the original user's manual for this bike? I checked GF's site and archives but no luck. I emailed their contact address and requested a manual or more info but I haven't heard anything back. I guess I could look on ebay to try and find an original paper copy if I can't find one for free online. I just don't know that it would be worth it. I downloaded the oldest GF manual I could find. It's from 2002 and I don't know how much of it pertains to the bike I have since I believe it was originally manufactured in 94 or 95. I am under the impression that mtn bikes have changed a lot since then after perusing these forums.

    -I found the sticky on maintenance and things to check before a ride at the top of the beginner's forum, but if anyone could offer any additional advice on what to check out on a bike that has sat for a long time that would be great. I'm also looking for a kind of a rebuild guide or how-to so if anyone could give me a link to a good one that would be fantastic and much appreciated.

    Thanks a lot and I hope you all have a great day and safe riding.

  2. #2
    Truly Doneski
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    First, what kind of fork is it and what kind of shape is it in?

    Are the pedals clipless or do they have a strap? What brand are they?

    I think your best bet on finding a manual would be to call Fisherbikes, but I doubt they have one and they may charge you. The only think I could find on this bike online was http://www.bikepedia.com/quickbike/B...toto&Type=bike which probably tells you nothing you don't know.

    If you don't get a lot of responses to this post, you may want to shift it over to the Gary Fisher section of the forums.

    Welcome to MTBR man!

  3. #3
    I Have Cookies
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    First things first...... Take off the fork and hurl it far far into the nearest trash heap! that things old!! like early 90's old!! Here's a pdf link to it if you really want to keep it this should be a good resource http://www.suspensionforkparts.net/tangegs.php Next what kind of pedals are they? If shimano or the like you should have no problem finding proper "cleats". I'd get some new brake pads and new tires tune it up and go have fun! As for the fork a rigid would fit the bill nicely!!
    The most important thing is what God thinks about it. He will have the final say. Joshua Stinebrink

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    Kimo

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the info. I thought about posting to the GF sub-forum but thought I'd try here first.

    I don't know what brand pedals I have, but here is a pic:



    The forks are pretty jacked up. They don't offer any resistance when I compress them and they don't rebound at all. Thanks for the advice to go with a rigid fork replacement, would you please elaborate on why I should choose rigid over suspension? I would think that suspension forks would be better for trails. I've got a lot of research to do, so I'll probably stumble across the answer to that soon.

    I pulled the chain and wheels off today. The wheel bearings are packed with grit and are terrible. I have some white grease for my M1 Garand, it's actually NAPA auto lubriplate that is used for rebuilding engines and lubing pistons. I was thinking I could use something like simple green to degrease the bearings and re-pack them with the white grease I have. I'm just not sure if it is okay to use that stuff or not. I don't see why it wouldn't work, but I'm going to hold off on doing that for the time being. Right now I'm just trying to clean up the rusty gears and the chain. I think most of the parts are serviceable but I'm not sure about one of the shifters.

    I'll keep studying up the great links I'm finding. If any of you have any favorite links that relate to what I'm doing I'd love to take a look at them. Thanks again.

  5. #5
    I Have Cookies
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    Those are old shimanos if the bearings are smooth I'd clean em up and rock them! Don't bother with the chain just get a new one for this bike I'd think a kmc z chain will be great 8 spd. You are Gonna need a suspension corrected fork look at the surley offerings. For degreaser I'd use a good quality brakecleen type product don't bother with simplegreen it won't do anything for the grease....
    The most important thing is what God thinks about it. He will have the final say. Joshua Stinebrink

    ____
    Kimo

  6. #6
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    Last night I tried to clean the cassette sprockets but I couldn't get it off since I don't have a chain whip. I tried cleaning it and the chain with BreakFree CLP and an old toothbrush. The chain wasn't too bad but the cassette gears are rusted. I'm planning to try and clean up everything I can and learn about working on bikes with this one. That way if I screw anything up I won't be too mad at myself. I think I'll have to buy a new fork unless I can repair this one for a lot less than a new one would cost.

  7. #7
    Can't feel my legs
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    I recomend not replacing the chain, as this will all but insure the entire drivetrain needing to be replaced.
    Any MTB shoe will work, but you will also need a set of SPD cleats.

  8. #8
    Picture Unrelated
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    That fork is probably a lost cause unless you can find some new elastomers (the thing that provides the spring in your fork) that will fit in it. Perhaps someone will chime in if they know if another manufacturer's elastomers will fit.

    I think the reason everyone is steering you in the direction of a rigid fork is that you can get one of those for $50 where you would need to spend a couple hundred on a decent fork, and even then it's going to be hard to find a proper fork. In order to ride properly, you'll need to find a 65mm fork with cantilever brake hanger, and likely with a 1" steerer tube. It's a hard find for something that works well, and the used market will be full of forks that work no better than the one you have.

    Put a rigid fork on and save your money for a modern bike to take off road. Measure the diameter of the steerer tube of the fork (it's 1" or 1 1/8"), and I'm going to assume it's a threaded headset, so measure the length of the steer tube. DO NOT buy a suspension corrected fork unless that bike magically came out of 1995 with a 100mm fork on it.

    On the chain, NEVER replace any individual drivetrain piece without checking the chain stretch first. If the old chain is all worn out, a new chain will not work with the worn out cogs and rings. If the bike was never rode, then you will be fine switching out any piece that is rusted.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by azsixshooter
    Thanks for the info. I thought about posting to the GF sub-forum but thought I'd try here first.

    I don't know what brand pedals I have, but here is a pic:



    The forks are pretty jacked up. They don't offer any resistance when I compress them and they don't rebound at all. Thanks for the advice to go with a rigid fork replacement, would you please elaborate on why I should choose rigid over suspension? I would think that suspension forks would be better for trails. I've got a lot of research to do, so I'll probably stumble across the answer to that soon.

    I pulled the chain and wheels off today. The wheel bearings are packed with grit and are terrible. I have some white grease for my M1 Garand, it's actually NAPA auto lubriplate that is used for rebuilding engines and lubing pistons. I was thinking I could use something like simple green to degrease the bearings and re-pack them with the white grease I have. I'm just not sure if it is okay to use that stuff or not. I don't see why it wouldn't work, but I'm going to hold off on doing that for the time being. Right now I'm just trying to clean up the rusty gears and the chain. I think most of the parts are serviceable but I'm not sure about one of the shifters.

    I'll keep studying up the great links I'm finding. If any of you have any favorite links that relate to what I'm doing I'd love to take a look at them. Thanks again.

    As the other blokes have said, get a rigid fork (for the reasons already mentioned). Remember, many of us rode trails without suspension for years - it either was available or wasn't affordable. Enjoy you bike and maybe later you'll upgrade.

  10. #10
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    On the question of grease, you will want to use grease that is made for a bike, not a car. Grease for cars is made to offer it's greatest protection at higher temperatures. Where bicycle grease is made to perform better at lower temperatures. No matter how hard you ride, you will never generate enough friction to get to the higher temperatures that car wheel bearings generate.

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