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  1. #1
    RvB
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    New question here. Getting sick while riding

    Hello,

    Noob rider here. This is my second year of riding.
    I ride with 2 friends once a week on the local trails here in Ontario, Canada.
    We ride for about 1.5 hour, nothing serious, mostly single track through the woods, quite a bit of hills.

    My problem is that when I start to get tired, I get sick to my stomach.
    I'm obviously not in great shape, and it's not like I'm totally wiped out at the time, but usually after a climb I take a rest, and then start to feel nausiated (sp).

    I get up at leadt an hour before we start, have a Peanutbutter sandwich and a glass of milk. I have a hydrapack filled with tapwater during the ride.

    Not sure if it's just a sign of being out of shape, or because of what I eat in the morning before we take off ?

    Any tips are appreciated.

    Rob.

  2. #2
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    I would skip the milk to begin with.

  3. #3
    sushi lover
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    go on riding for several more rides and see if the nausea goes away -- if not, schedule an appointment with your physician

  4. #4
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    I'd skip the milk too. try just water with your sandwich. maybe add a little jelly too for the carbs.

    does the nausea only start after a hard climb? it isn't clear to me from your post... if so, then that just means that you pushed too hard relative to your fitness and the pitch of the climb. if you get nauseous whether or not you climb, then you still might be pushing a little too hard relative to your fitness. you might also experiment with different foods if you are the sensitive type.

  5. #5
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    You know what the RADS say?

    "NO CHUNKS"

    Heh... nevermind.

  6. #6
    ride hard take risks
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    I find that if i suck down a gel with alot of suger or sodium i will cough soo deep i will spit up a crap load of flem. Really sucks gacking on the trail.

  7. #7
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    I used to blow chuncks on some climbs when I was in bad shape. I found that not eating before a ride stopped most of that.

    My thoughts are that, if your are breating really hard and straining you tighten up your abs therefore squeezing your internals and then there are only two places for the excess contents to go.

    My trick is to take deep breaths and try to slow my breathing and relax at the first opportunity. I usually start just before the top of the climb.

    I also agree with hamachi because it could be a bigger problem than we or you think.
    Team MOJO Wheels.

  8. #8
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    Had the same problem...

    Just to be safe, I want everyone to know that I am not a doctor. That being said, I am also a noob rider, as I've been riding for only a couple of months. That being said, when I first started, after a couple of steep uphills I had to pull over due to nausea. Now that I've been riding consistently, that feeling is gone. For me, it was simply due to my body reacting to a new exercise. Now that I'm accustomed to it, the hills that used to kill me are pretty easy. Just give your body some time to adjust and try to ride consistent. If the problem persists, like the earlier posts, head to a doc.

  9. #9
    Head First
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    It's probably due to your fitness level and the milk and pb&j. That's a gut bomb right there. Try eating somthing lighter.

  10. #10
    My Member Rides a MTB
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    Definitely lay off the milk w/ PB&J before the ride... as the above poster said, that's truly a "gut bomb". I used to eat PB&J sandwiches before I would go to the gym and workout, but had to stop when I realized that is was making me incredibly nauseated during heavy lifting/cardio. Once I stopped eating beforehand, the nausea went away completely. Sometimes, when I'm really hungry I'll eat a granola bar or one packet of instant oatmeal; it doesn't bother me at all.
    '05 Giant Trance 2
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  11. #11
    Glad to Be Alive
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    try an easier ride or don't push so hard
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  12. #12
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    The Anti Sick Fomula

    You should probably take several of the suggestions.

    I would try and eat at least 1.5 to 2 hours before your ride. I find that some oatmeal and a Cliff bar give me just enough energy without the puke factor (I have a weak stomach). Find a trail that is a little flatter so you can build up your endurance. Don't hesitate to take a break and catch your breath when you feel like your pushing yourself too hard. Give your body the time to work up to a peak condition. I would also try and plan a few rides a week where you do something easier. Do a few rides by yourself so you can control your pace instead of playing keep up with your buddies. People have a tendency to try and impress their friends beyond their abilities.

    Don't give up!

  13. #13
    My Member Rides a MTB
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    These are all good suggestions, but honestly, the easiest thing for you to do would start to enjoy throwing up.
    '05 Giant Trance 2
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    The writer is the engineer of the human soul. -Joseph Stalin

  14. #14
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    I don't know what you're talking about, because i've never gotten nauseous. Sorry.
    I can get tired easily, but never nauseous. Even today, I was biking around with friends for 4 hours after eating a big turkey sandwich, a bottle of Powerade, and a large Milk Chug.
    I would cut down on the riding a little, and drink orange juice instead of milk.

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