1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    getting new tires

    I have a 2005 Trek 3900 with Bontrager Connection Trail, 26x2.0 tires, and Alloy front, Shimano RM30 rear hub; Matrix 550 rims. Is it possible to go to my LBS and get new and better tires that are maybe 26x2.3 - 26-2.5? Or is that just not possible. And if I can, would I have to get new rims and tubes?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Domestic Fowl
    Reputation: FreeRangeChicken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alex923
    I have a 2005 Trek 3900 with Bontrager Connection Trail, 26x2.0 tires, and Alloy front, Shimano RM30 rear hub; Matrix 550 rims. Is it possible to go to my LBS and get new and better tires that are maybe 26x2.3 - 26-2.5? Or is that just not possible. And if I can, would I have to get new rims and tubes?

    Thanks
    Probably the deciding factor will be the clearance in your frame and fork, not your rims. I would venture to guess that 26x2.5 is out of the question on the rear if that is an XC type bike(maybe not). You may be able to get by with 26x2.3.

    It is common to run a wider tire up front. I've got 2.3's on the front of my bikes and 2.1's on the back. 2.3's will not fit in either of my frames. The 2.3's are heavy muggers, too (Panaracer Fire FR Pros). Will probably go back to a lighter tire in the future.



    Other things to think about:
    Fatter tires are going to weigh more(maybe significantly more). Adding rotating mass, espescially far from the axle, is absolutely the worst place to add weight to a bike. rotating mass effects acceleration... not to mention having to haul the extra weight(possibly significant extra weight) up the hills. Fatter tires will tend to increase rolling resistance (larger contact patch), though, tread design is also a major factor here.

    Fatter tires will tend to float better in soft trail conditions (like sand) and can yield very good control characteristics(climbing, braking, cornering) due to the fact that you can usually run lower air pressure.


    FRC
    Last edited by FreeRangeChicken; 04-20-2006 at 04:57 PM.

  3. #3
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
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    For your age & size i would suggest Maxxis HighRoller 2.35 front & rear.

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...ller+Tire.aspx

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