1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
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    Getting measured for a fatbike

    Hey all, I just started working for a company with bike fanatics, and I myself like spending time outdoors and fly fishing. I was told a fat bike would be a good choice for subpar trails and mucky conditions, river rock, sand, and other fun terrain. It's been a good 17 years since ive been on a mountain bike so I would like to be measured. I this a scam or is it for real I've gotten a two different answers weather I should get measured or not. The guy who used to race says hell yea it saved him multiple hours of back pain, and the other school of thought is did you get measured for your last mountain bike which I didn't and felt fine. However that was 17 years ago i think I at least need to know what size frame I need, any thoughts. I'm 6" 295lbs and just have ridden a 18" Pugsley that felt good. Thanks for your time.

  2. #2
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    Sorry I forgot to tell you that bike measurements are charged by the hour and can end up being $250 pluss.

  3. #3
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    I think you mean fit. It's a little more involved than just having some parts of your body measured. The fitter actually sets up the bike for you. It often costs a bit more on the back end because if the fitter tells you you should use this insole and that shim, nobody's holding a gun to your head, but if you're in for a penny...

    I paid for a bike fit several years ago. It was some of the better money I've spent on cycling. I'd gotten back into it about a year before and gotten into a pattern of aggravating a flaky knee, having to take time off, and then causing another flare up as soon as I got back on my bike. In retrospect, I was riding like a moron - too much, too soon. But I'd also set up my bike wrong.

    Given that you last rode a bike 17 years ago, I think a $250/hour fit session is overkill and you might want to do it again in a year anyway. If you can get some basic help buying the right size bike and roughing in your setup, great. But I'd leave the high-dollar fit alone for now.

    Hop on a 16" and a 20" so you know what that feels like. Hop on a conventional mountain bike. Buy your favorite.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
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    Yes fit is what I meant, thanks for your advice I'll be shopping today.

  5. #5
    FBI tested, NSA approved!
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    Could be measured, Seven and Moots do customs that require measuring. Just sayin'. At your size I would recommend spec'ing 14 gauge natural finish straight spokes. Heavy riders tend to break black anodized spokes in the j-bend pretty frequently. Hell, I'm only 208 and I've re-laced all my bikes with natural spokes to get away from frequent broken spokes.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  6. #6
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    That's another reason why I'm going with a fatbike, I had fun riding it I've seen them packed with all sorts of heavy things. So I figured packing my fat a$$ around shouldn't be a problem for a surly Pugsley or a Pug Op.

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