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  1. #1
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    Getting back into it

    Hey guys,
    I rode mtn bikes some years ago (pre college) now that I'm done and can afford nice toys again I want to get back into the sport. My question is - Should I get a good midline
    (600-800 dollar bike) ride the hell out of it, crash a few times learning the sport again or would it be better to go ahead and get a bike like the X-Cal or the Kula 2-9 and just take my lumps on replacing more expensive components as I re-educate myself on proper riding? Both sides have their merit, and am just throwing out this questions to see what you 'experts' would recommend.
    Cheers

  2. #2
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    Well, I'm not an expert but I recently got back into mtb'ing after about 10 years and bought a $500 bike. I wish I had spent more. I like the frame and don't mind the cheaper components, but it's mainly the cheap fork I don't like. It's a Rock Shox Dart 3 and it's bouncy, sticky, and not plush. I think if you have the money at least look at $800 and up. Preferably $1200. That's where I would look if I had the money to buy a new bike. Have fun. I'm glad I got back into it. Having a blast.

  3. #3
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    What's with you guys needing a new bike to get back into it? I myself am just getting back into it after 9 years (graduated, married, house, dog, kid, kid) and I still have my old ride. She married me and the bike came with.

    Back in '99 I bought right at the price break point, where I could get the frame I wanted and then upgrade the components as I went. All these years later it still seems like a good idea as the components are relatively interchangeable still. I'm picking up with my plans where I left off and really wouldn't have had it any other way. This way you can get on it and ride again, then prioritize replacements moving forward as you re-educate yourself in equipment.

    Short answer: Get a bike in $900-1100 range with a good frame and then upgrade pieces when $$ allows.

  4. #4
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    My old Fisher is long gone, somewhere in between college and parents getting divorced the bike I enjoyed riding is no more (atleast no more for me) I think the advice given so far is probably right on. If I can afford the better go ahead and do it. Typically sound advice.

  5. #5
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    One thing I keep hearing from Bike salesmen (they must have focus-grouped this phrase to death) is "you'll be able to grow into this bike." I have no idea what that's supposed to mean, since I'm already full-grown and have been riding for 20 years. It must mean I'm looking at a better bike than I should be, in their opinion. But I think any bike you get that's under $800 is basically a disposable bike, but if you spend a little more it will retain its value for a little while, in case you decide to upgrade and still want to get something for it. Something in the $1400 range like you're talking about is definitely more of a commitment. I spent about that much on my last bike and I like it a lot, but maybe not "love" because it has some limitations. If I get a new mtb it will still be in the stable and get a lot of use, but I'll expand the types of riding I can do. I guess what I'm saying is that if you're really a "bike guy", then you'll tend to accumulate bikes rather than trying to trade-up.

  6. #6
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    I would buy what the best you could afford. I got back into biking during during my last to semseters of college so I bought my bike in spring of 07. I had a limit of little more than 600 to buy the bike and any upgrades. I bought an 07 rockhopper base and then the "upgrades" was a pair of M520 pedals, shoes and a small camelbak.

    I love my bike and over time it has and will continue to get minor upgrades as parts break. I will be buying another bike at some point and that one will force me to drop a much larger chunk of changed.

    Sum it up. If you can afford a better bike buy a better bike but do not go over budget.

  7. #7
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    Its hard to say, If you get the $800 bike then you can afford to play around with new saddle, handlebars, wheels, tires, etc. But, if you get a more expensive one, will it really fit perfectly out of the box anyway. I had a similar dillemma, $1700 for the Stumpy, or $1000 for the Rockhopper (both in 29er's). I weighed both bikes and the Stumpy was about 3lbs lighter, and it had better components, of course. I most likely would have changed the bars, saddle, and tires on the Stumpy anyway, so I got the Rockhopper. You know what, I love my Rockhopper and ride the crap out of it, it is not a beater, it is an excellent bike and I certainly do not notice it being heavy or anything.

    I still wonder about the Stumpy, or even the GF Superfly, but you know what, I am having an excellent time on the bike I got. I think the mid level bikes today are so much better than the ones 10 years ago, its not even funny. At $800-$1000, you will get a bad ass bike. At $1000-$2000, you will also get a bad ass bike, but will it really bring double the fun - somehow I doubt it.

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