1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
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    Getting back into it

    Hey guys,
    I rode mtn bikes some years ago (pre college) now that I'm done and can afford nice toys again I want to get back into the sport. My question is - Should I get a good midline
    (600-800 dollar bike) ride the hell out of it, crash a few times learning the sport again or would it be better to go ahead and get a bike like the X-Cal or the Kula 2-9 and just take my lumps on replacing more expensive components as I re-educate myself on proper riding? Both sides have their merit, and am just throwing out this questions to see what you 'experts' would recommend.
    Cheers

  2. #2
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    Well, I'm not an expert but I recently got back into mtb'ing after about 10 years and bought a $500 bike. I wish I had spent more. I like the frame and don't mind the cheaper components, but it's mainly the cheap fork I don't like. It's a Rock Shox Dart 3 and it's bouncy, sticky, and not plush. I think if you have the money at least look at $800 and up. Preferably $1200. That's where I would look if I had the money to buy a new bike. Have fun. I'm glad I got back into it. Having a blast.

  3. #3
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    What's with you guys needing a new bike to get back into it? I myself am just getting back into it after 9 years (graduated, married, house, dog, kid, kid) and I still have my old ride. She married me and the bike came with.

    Back in '99 I bought right at the price break point, where I could get the frame I wanted and then upgrade the components as I went. All these years later it still seems like a good idea as the components are relatively interchangeable still. I'm picking up with my plans where I left off and really wouldn't have had it any other way. This way you can get on it and ride again, then prioritize replacements moving forward as you re-educate yourself in equipment.

    Short answer: Get a bike in $900-1100 range with a good frame and then upgrade pieces when $$ allows.

  4. #4
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    My old Fisher is long gone, somewhere in between college and parents getting divorced the bike I enjoyed riding is no more (atleast no more for me) I think the advice given so far is probably right on. If I can afford the better go ahead and do it. Typically sound advice.

  5. #5
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    One thing I keep hearing from Bike salesmen (they must have focus-grouped this phrase to death) is "you'll be able to grow into this bike." I have no idea what that's supposed to mean, since I'm already full-grown and have been riding for 20 years. It must mean I'm looking at a better bike than I should be, in their opinion. But I think any bike you get that's under $800 is basically a disposable bike, but if you spend a little more it will retain its value for a little while, in case you decide to upgrade and still want to get something for it. Something in the $1400 range like you're talking about is definitely more of a commitment. I spent about that much on my last bike and I like it a lot, but maybe not "love" because it has some limitations. If I get a new mtb it will still be in the stable and get a lot of use, but I'll expand the types of riding I can do. I guess what I'm saying is that if you're really a "bike guy", then you'll tend to accumulate bikes rather than trying to trade-up.

  6. #6
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    I would buy what the best you could afford. I got back into biking during during my last to semseters of college so I bought my bike in spring of 07. I had a limit of little more than 600 to buy the bike and any upgrades. I bought an 07 rockhopper base and then the "upgrades" was a pair of M520 pedals, shoes and a small camelbak.

    I love my bike and over time it has and will continue to get minor upgrades as parts break. I will be buying another bike at some point and that one will force me to drop a much larger chunk of changed.

    Sum it up. If you can afford a better bike buy a better bike but do not go over budget.

  7. #7
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    Its hard to say, If you get the $800 bike then you can afford to play around with new saddle, handlebars, wheels, tires, etc. But, if you get a more expensive one, will it really fit perfectly out of the box anyway. I had a similar dillemma, $1700 for the Stumpy, or $1000 for the Rockhopper (both in 29er's). I weighed both bikes and the Stumpy was about 3lbs lighter, and it had better components, of course. I most likely would have changed the bars, saddle, and tires on the Stumpy anyway, so I got the Rockhopper. You know what, I love my Rockhopper and ride the crap out of it, it is not a beater, it is an excellent bike and I certainly do not notice it being heavy or anything.

    I still wonder about the Stumpy, or even the GF Superfly, but you know what, I am having an excellent time on the bike I got. I think the mid level bikes today are so much better than the ones 10 years ago, its not even funny. At $800-$1000, you will get a bad ass bike. At $1000-$2000, you will also get a bad ass bike, but will it really bring double the fun - somehow I doubt it.

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