1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Getting back on. Bike needs work.

    After relocating from the US to hong kong more than 5 years ago I put my riding on hold. I want to start riding again in hong kong once the weather cools in about a month. I've kept my bike all this time. I have a Trek 4300 bike and its been sitting in my apartment, not in storage.

    Obviously it needs a tune up, since even before i moved it never had one apart from my own basic maintenance of cleaning and lubricating the chain all parts are original.

    i'm wondering what i should check and consider replacing when i get it tuned up by a professional. Do i need new tires? What about cables and bike chain? The gear cables have some rust on them.

    I've kept this bike all this time because when i bought it everyone said the frame Is excellent and you can upgrade and change the other parts later. So i'm also interested in hearing any upgrade ideas.

  2. #2
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    Don't worry about upgrades right now, a tune up at shops around here are around 70 us$. Replacing cables and housing is a good idea if they have more than sufface rust,you could try cleaning them up. The chain should be okay as long as it isn't too rusty. The tires ,as long as they don't have dry rot are okay for now.Check the tubes to make sure they hold air. Check the brake pads ,they can get hard .How much did you ride it before you moved?Learning how to do your own tune ups and other things can save you lots of money ,check Youtube ,Park Tools and Sheldon Brown .

  3. #3
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    You can check a lot yourself and replace parts also if you need to.

    As ranger above said check your chain, if its rusty throw it out get a new one. if its been sat that long i would anyway. you can get one cheap from the LBS. if you do this yourself youll need the tool to do it but if you really arent confident im sure they will fit it if you take the bike probably for no cost (make sure you tip). Give the old chain a good lube if you do keep it.

    Check your break pads are intact and not rusted up also. you may need to replace them (just the pads).

    As the bike has been in a controlled climate you shouldnt really have any rust damage but check all moving parts alll the same. Take the bike outside and cycle through the gears and check how smoothly they are changing. Check the suspension also, check for any ticking or rubbing and look where the source is if it excists.

    If you find an issue, you tube or google it. You can also ask the fine people on here. I learned off the internet how to service my bike and stuff that the lbs had to do which was a long time ago now, i was chummy with and they let me watch (I alsways tipped really well so they were always happy to show me). Im on first name terms now with them and i always get a little discount, all because i showed appreciation in the first place.

    It pays to be loyal and get a good network going with them. Im actually going riding soon with one of the guys also.

    When it comes to upgrading I would get back in the saddle for a few weeks first though and then start to look to upgrade. Obviously if something is shot do that first but then you will look to get better performance parts and look at weight reduction also. Get your bike up on Bike pedia, look how much parts weigh and reviews on them. then compare them to other parts you can use to upgrade them and then evaluate whether it is worth the upgrade. Ask people who know their stuff also, they will always give good advice.

    enjoy getting back!

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the info. Based on this I'm planning to buy some degreaser and lubricant and start working on it myself. Right now there is a lot of gunk in the chain and rotors that needs to be cleaned before I ride it. I already pumped up the tires and they are holding air.

    I rode the bike on trails maybe 20 times in all the time I've owned it so I think most of the components are still in decent shape.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ludwigrhysy View Post
    I don't believe this subject has ever been covered before. We should discuss it further
    Great! Let's do that.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ludwigrhysy View Post
    I don't believe this subject has ever been covered before. We should discuss it further
    People getting back on their bikes has been discussed before, but each persons situation is different, hence we continue to talk about it and thus what this thread is for.

    I suggest you simply not click on the forum link in future therefore you wont have to read the thread and fill it with Sarcasm.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by plexxx View Post
    Thanks for the info. Based on this I'm planning to buy some degreaser and lubricant and start working on it myself. Right now there is a lot of gunk in the chain and rotors that needs to be cleaned before I ride it. I already pumped up the tires and they are holding air.

    I rode the bike on trails maybe 20 times in all the time I've owned it so I think most of the components are still in decent shape.
    Plexx get some degreaser and soak the chain in it for a good 30 mins. I use a gatorade bottle and fill it with degreaser. that way i can put a cap on it and shake it out a bit. After that i use boiling water and dish detergent and let soak for 15 mins shaking at times. Then i rinse it with more boiling water and then i dry it out with a hair dryer to make sure theres no moisture. After that add a liberal amount of chain lube and you are on your way.

    Check your disc brake pads. If they have been sat a while use some emery paper (like really fine sand paper)to smooth them out a bit and will remove any surface rust.

    Then get out on a trail and ride to your hearts content!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brockwan View Post
    Plexx get some degreaser and soak the chain in it for a good 30 mins. I use a gatorade bottle and fill it with degreaser. that way i can put a cap on it and shake it out a bit. After that i use boiling water and dish detergent and let soak for 15 mins shaking at times. Then i rinse it with more boiling water and then i dry it out with a hair dryer to make sure theres no moisture. After that add a liberal amount of chain lube and you are on your way.

    Check your disc brake pads. If they have been sat a while use some emery paper (like really fine sand paper)to smooth them out a bit and will remove any surface rust.

    Then get out on a trail and ride to your hearts content!

    I've never actually removed my chain before. I will do this to get it good and clean.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by plexxx View Post
    I've never actually removed my chain before. I will do this to get it good and clean.
    Yes definitely do a removal job if its been sitting. You'll be able to pick up a chain tool cheap or I got a multi tool with a chain tool on it that I can take with me on rides which works just as good. When removing the pin don't remove it all the way out as its a pain in the arse to get back in. Try and get the pin out just enough so the link will disconnect. That way it's a hell of a lot easier to put back together.

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