1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Front Suspension RST Gila T6 has got to go!

    Hey Everyone -
    I have a 2005 Trek 4300 and that POS RST Gila T6 has got to go!

    Looking for a nice front suspension, I'm a 200-pounder who likes long XC rides/singletrack, a few jumps here and there but nothing too crazy.

    Any suggestions on best bang for the buck?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: oldskoolbiker's Avatar
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    I picked up a 2005 Marzocchi MX Pro ETA. Good bang for the buck fork. It's got ETA which locks the fork out in the compressed position. Great for climbing. 120mm, 4 pounds. Got it for $220, $232 after shipping. Looks like the raised the price a little though.

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/137...erIN050FO1.htm

  3. #3
    Who is John Galt?
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  4. #4
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    the MX pro is an excellent upgrade.
    will there be beer?

  5. #5
    dirty trail dog
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    Compared to that RST fork, anything would be an upgrade. I upgraded the RST on my son's Hardrock Sport to a '06 Rock Shox J4 and I was amazed at how good that thing felt. It has U-Turn adjustment and feels almost as nice as my '06 Reba. Almost...

    http://aebike.com/page.cfm?action=de...=30&SKU=FK6003
    yep...

  6. #6
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    Yes that's definetely true. My old raleigh m20 had an rst fork, and it's SO MUCH worse than the manitou splice comp on my new bike. If you go to the product review section of mtbr.com, you will see that marzocchi is definitely the way to go. If you are wondering, I got the bike with manitou because it was the 2005 version so i got a good deal.

    Your bike doesn't have disc brakes, does it? If it doesn't, then the rock shox reba is outta the question (it's disc-only)

    I'd go with marzocchi just to be safe, because they have the best overall reviews in the product review section (except for fox of course )

  7. #7
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    Hey, I have a question that is only SLIGHTLY off topic, hope no one minds. I have the RST fork mentioned above on my Hardrock that I bought a couple of months ago,...seems fine to me,...what exactly makes it a POS, and what benefits would I see from upgrading to a new one?

    Thanks

  8. #8
    Freshly Fujified
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    RST Gila

    Quote Originally Posted by AwCrimety
    Hey, I have a question that is only SLIGHTLY off topic, hope no one minds. I have the RST fork mentioned above on my Hardrock that I bought a couple of months ago,...seems fine to me,...what exactly makes it a POS, and what benefits would I see from upgrading to a new one?

    Thanks
    The RST Gila and other forks like it use a damping system that has been outclassed by newer offerings. The newer forks use more sophisticated damping and spring systems that soften the bumps better and have a more effective rebound. Many people have described the Coil/MCU forks such as the Gila as being like pogo sticks.

    Please keep in mind that this type of damping may very well work for you as a rider, and there is nothing wrong with that. I would not replace it if you are happy with it's performance. If at some point you feel you have realized some limitations in the fork, or if it ever brakes, then consider upgrading. Don't succumb to herd mentality.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the info

    Thanks for the reply Clyde. I also bought a Hardrock with the RST fork, and this is my first MTB since college. To me the fork seems OK, but my last bike was a fully rigid GF Tass., so any suspension is an upgrade. Right now I don't intend on upgrading the fork, but it is nice to know what some of the differences are between the RST and nicer forks. Thanks again.
    Trying hard to get less fat...

  10. #10
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    I ride a 3700. The main thing to watch when you upgrade the fork is not to get one a lot longer or shorter in the axle to crown area. I replaced my 65 mm rst with the manitou splice dive edition. I went from 65 mm travel up to 80 with not a lot of change in ride height. It was a bit longer and slacked my steering out a bit but it was a welcome change. The fork was only 120 bucks, and has adj. preload, rebound and damp. with a lockout. The only things I have done to it are to rempve the diva sticker and swap the 170 pound spring out to accomodate my 215 lbs of useless bulk...
    " No! try not, Do or do not. There is no try. "

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