1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
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    front suspension

    i have an 06 hardrock sport.

    why does everyone say the shock sucks. it seems fine to me.

    what is a front supsension supposed to do?
    what are good qualities of a fork?
    are forks so supposed to give as much compression as possible with out bottoming out?

  2. #2
    bang
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    well, that is a low-end fork. better forks are lighter, and have more sophisticated dampening and rebound circuits. many are also very adjustable, to the point of almost having too many things to mess with!

    the goal of suspension is to keep the tire in contact with the ground.

    as for feel and whatnot, that is subjective and depends on how you want to set the fork up. that said, i'd ride this thing into the dirt. if you ever get the green, you can get a higher-end fork in the future if you want. if you can, try to demo a bike that has a nice fork on it (rockshox reba, fox f100rlt, marzocchi marathon, etc).

  3. #3
    Work Hard, Play Harder
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    Quote Originally Posted by brakeslide
    i have an 06 hardrock sport.

    why does everyone say the shock sucks. it seems fine to me.

    what is a front supsension supposed to do?
    what are good qualities of a fork?
    are forks so supposed to give as much compression as possible with out bottoming out?
    My first mtb was a TREK 4300. It's basically one of TREK's entry level mtb's as is the hardrock for Specialized. As your riding progresses and you try different things you may notice some shortcomings on things like your fork, frame, shifters, brakes, etc. I know I, for one, quickly outgrew my 4300 and had to step up to a better mtb after only a few rides, while a bike like the hardrock is fine for some no matter how long they ride for. My brother had that same bike and it lasted hime 1 season then he upgraded. A better fork will have more travel, weigh less, have more adjustment capabilities, and be able to lock out to the point where it barely moves at all. The first fork I had used to bottom out like crazy on the trails and even on the roads. I knew that was a bad sign. Now that I have stepped up to a better fork I can really see the difference. The people who say that fork sucks, probably ride pretty hard, like myself even though I'm still learning every time I go out, and a fork like that just won't do. That dosen't make it suck, it's just not the right fork for some people. If you like it, and it works well for you, then stay with that bike and enjoy it.
    06 Rocky Mountain ETSX - Full XTR, Fox Shox, Crossmax XL Wheels

  4. #4
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    A basic entry level fork will absorb bigger hits ok...like dropping off rocks, logs, etc. Where they really come up short is with damping. Damping refers to the fork absorbing small rocks, roots, etc. When you see one of the Baja type desert races with the buggies riding over everything, you should notice the suspension traveling wildly up and down while the buggie rides fairly flat and level.....that's damping. If you ever test a bike with a higher end fork, you will also notice it to be much less harsh for the big hits too.

  5. #5
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    Basically, no, there's nothing wrong with your current fork. True it may not have as much damping or a lockout as some forks out therem, but if you're just getting into the sport, all the adjustments are gonna get confusing as hell. The fork may not be right for every type of riding, but no component or bike or anything is universal. I mean, can you imagine having a 40+ lb. downhill rig rolling down the street? Ugh!

    Like it's been said, I'd ride that thing right into the ground. If something breaks, by all means replace it, but don't worry about those people and their opinions. By the time you get tired of that fork, you'll probably be looking to upgrade the whole bike. New bike time! Yay!

    Just my opinion.

    Ross
    "I don't wanna die without any scars. So come on, let's do it before I lose my nerve" - Tyler Durden (Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk)

  6. #6
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    Wink Bashing people's equipment is for losers.

    The people who say that fork sucks, probably ride pretty hard, like myself even though I'm still learning every time I go out, and a fork like that just won't do.
    I have found this is not the case......more like people who want you to think they ride hard. I'm of the opinion that people who ride hard don't talk about it and certainly wouldn't bash you for owning that bike or fork.

    Don't listen to negative people for positive results.

    Hardrock, nice bike man ....enjoy the ride.

    I started out on a Trek 820 Antelope ....steel, no front suspension.....cro-moly rigid fork. I used to ride down flights of stairs at college, jump over garbage cans and ride trails in the Adirondack Mountains ( NY) regularly. I had the haters in my day too ....it will probably never change....and neither will they.

    Close your eyes and think about the best day you've had on that hardrock ....then tell your "friends" to go screw themselves (*smile*).
    '06 Stumpjumper FSR Comp

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by NY2CO
    I have found this is not the case......more like people who want you to think they ride hard. I'm of the opinion that people who ride hard don't talk about it and certainly wouldn't bash you for owning that bike or fork.

    Don't listen to negative people for positive results.

    Hardrock, nice bike man ....enjoy the ride.

    I started out on a Trek 820 Antelope ....steel, no front suspension.....cro-moly rigid fork. I used to ride down flights of stairs at college, jump over garbage cans and ride trails in the Adirondack Mountains ( NY) regularly. I had the haters in my day too ....it will probably never change....and neither will they.

    Close your eyes and think about the best day you've had on that hardrock ....then tell your "friends" to go screw themselves (*smile*).
    Right on! Most of us who've graduated to more expensive bikes at some point started out on what we probably now refer to as a cheap POS. After falling out of cycling for several years, I got back into things a couple of years ago with a Raleigh M60 w/ Manitou Six fork. The reviews on the MTBR review section are pretty bad for this fork but as with all reviews here and on other websites, you really have to take them with a grain of salt. Taking the Six for example, people were saying how it broke after a 5 foot drop and other things of the sort.

    The Mantiou Six, like your RST fork, is an entry level fork on a entry level bike not intended for 5 foot drops. With any product, if you try to take it past it's intended use, you will eventually have a bad experience. The better forks tend to cost about the same as a complete entry level hardtail and of course you get what you pay for. Ride your bike and enjoy it. Eventually, as your skills improve and you will want more (that's just the nature of mountain bike). And I'm sure you will say the same things most of us did early on like "this is plenty of bike for me" or "I will NEVER spend $xxxx for a bike". When it comes time to upgrade, you will immediately feel the difference with higher end forks but that shouldn't stop you from enjoying what you have now.

    The funny thing here is that what I now refer to as my cheap POS Raleigh has now been converted to a single speed (still running the Six fork setup really stiff) and I'm having a blast on it.

  8. #8
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    WOW ! this hasd been very helpful. thank you all

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by NY2CO
    I have found this is not the case......more like people who want you to think they ride hard. I'm of the opinion that people who ride hard don't talk about it and certainly wouldn't bash you for owning that bike or fork.

    Don't listen to negative people for positive results.

    Hardrock, nice bike man ....enjoy the ride.

    I started out on a Trek 820 Antelope ....steel, no front suspension.....cro-moly rigid fork. I used to ride down flights of stairs at college, jump over garbage cans and ride trails in the Adirondack Mountains ( NY) regularly. I had the haters in my day too ....it will probably never change....and neither will they.

    Close your eyes and think about the best day you've had on that hardrock ....then tell your "friends" to go screw themselves (*smile*).

    Anyone who bashes someone for their bike is just a moron anyway, no matter what their reasoning behind it is. If a guy shows up on a Huffy and wants to ride, myself, and the people I ride with, will be more than happy to let him join us. Real MTB'ing is about getting out there and riding whatever kind of bike you have, on any trail that you enjoy. The only people that I can honestly say I have absolutely no respect for, are the ones who go out there and drop a few grand on a bike, then never ride the damn thing. I think that the more you ride, the more you will find that most bikers are the exact opposite of your friends who knock your fork. Most people you see out on the trails are friendly as hell and respectful. I have made alot of friends since I started riding and I'll probably make tons more. So screw the haters.
    06 Rocky Mountain ETSX - Full XTR, Fox Shox, Crossmax XL Wheels

  10. #10
    Going for a ride......
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    My first bike was a hardrock comp with a Judy TT fork - which at the time was probably one up from the most basic entry level fork you could get. It was absolutely fine for me and simple - I could take it apart to an extent and service it myself. As my riding progressed over a few years and the fork had had a good use I was starting to notice it's limitations - mainly the lack of damping, and it probably needed a proper service which doesn't help.

    Like everyone says more expensive forks are better usually in the fact that they are lighter, much more adjustable and also feel more plush. Recently I brought a new bike - really it would be considered an entry level duallie. The suspenion on it is more adjustable & softer (probably because I can set it up for my weight). Even so there will be people out there who think it's crap, because they've gone past that stage and now onto better things.
    In a way it's like you and your hardrock, you would probably now think that the "wallmart" type suspension bikes are crap and wouldn't ride one unless you had to, but then how far up the chain do you go? We all have to start somewhere and the Hardrock is a fantastic bike for the money. If people are bagging you about the fork, well there is two possibilities - either they're jelaous, people who envy people usually try & get them down, or they have had it really good and expereienced much more expensive forks and now have their heads stuck in their arses!

    Just enjoy your bike mate, don't let people talk it down, and it is a much better bike than alot of others out there are riding!
    energetix



  11. #11
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    Good advice all the way around. My first "real" mountain bike was a HardRock (before they even listed Comp or Anything). Found out with the quickness that my limitations were a lot lower than the bike's limitations. Granted, it was a heavy rig, but after all I did to that bike (I STILL don't know how it ended up 15 feet up in a pine tree that one time), it's still running strong, fork and all.

    The people who rag on you for your fork or frame or whatever are giving you crap cuz you're a beginner, which isn't cool. They had to start somewhere, too, right? And if you showed up with a brand new StumpJumper FSR, they'd give you a ration about being a poser. You're not gonna win with those people, so forget em and pedal, man!

    In the end, kick butt, take names, and increase your fitness level and skillset. If you want to upgrade later, so be it, if not, there's nothing wrong with that, either.

    Ross

    P.S. I remember saying I'd never spend more on a bike than my first car ($600). I just dropped more on a component upgrade. Where did it all go wrong?!
    "I don't wanna die without any scars. So come on, let's do it before I lose my nerve" - Tyler Durden (Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk)

  12. #12
    Going for a ride......
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    Yes isn't that ture, if you show up with a real great bike and you're a beginner you'd get comments about that too.

    Most people start on entry level bikes, others are lucky enough to be able to afford the top stuff right from the start. Some people on cheap bike have top skills and some people on real expensive bikes can't ride for s*%t. Which would you rather be?

    Try to always remember what it's really all about - riding & the fun of it, being able to enjoy that no matter what bike you're on. And once your current bike serves it's time I'm sure you will know how to appreciate a better one.

    Read too many mtb magazines & it's easy to get into the "best gear" or "upgrading" or "reducing weight" obsession because most of the bikes and stuff in the mags show what the pros and the like ride, so naturally we all think it must be the best. (kind of like everyone wanting to be the ideal figure / weight / look) anyway I'm sure the mags keep it real at the same time though or try to.
    energetix



  13. #13
    Glad to Be Alive
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    in the beginning of riding bikes everything seams good.....as you progress you will learn the differences.....if you think your fork is fine, then don't worry about what others say. Just ride with what you have untill you feel the fork or anything else is holding you back(when your riding ability out performs the limitations of the bike
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

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