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Thread: freewheel slop

  1. #1
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    freewheel slop

    Was practicing stepping up by climbing the curb in front of my house. I noticed as I positioned my feet in preparation for a push to get over the curb, I had to rotate the crank forward about 1/4 -1/2 a turn before the freewheel engaged & I was able to power the rear wheel.
    Tips, hints, suggestions?

  2. #2
    beater
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    freewheel slop

    This is why people get excited about "points of engagement" (POE). It's a measure of how far your hub has to rotate before it engages. Generally speaking, higher cost hubs (Industry 9, Chris King, Hadley) engage sooner. Other quality hubs like DT Swiss and Hope aren't as fast, but still have their benefits.
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

    Riding in Helena? Everything you need to know, right here.

  3. #3
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    No hub instantly engages? So I need to start with my foot a lot higher & figure out the exact POE.
    Thanks

  4. #4
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    Putting way to much work into climbing a curb. Simple step ups like that just need momentum. I get up normal curbs no problems if its on the taller side I just leave it in whatever cog or only 1 bigger so I have minimal movement for engagement. And biggest reason for how much u have to rotate is too low of gear for ur speed. Smaller rear cog, the "faster" the rear hub will engage.

    Beyond that ull need a high dollar hub.
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  5. #5
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    I was practicing in a technical fashion using balance & brakes. I can hop a curb.
    Just got this bike & disc brakes are new to me so I need to find the sweet spots.
    Bike balances well & the brakes do their job. Feeling pretty comfortable with it .

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Just never stop pedaling. Then points of engagement don't matter.

    In seriousness, yeah, it's normal. I don't notice it, but I'm sure I've developed some kind of weird habit in response to typically riding bikes with inexpensive rear hubs.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    Trying to develop my tech skills. Balance, hops & steps . It's pretty challenging for an older fat man. I can do basic trail riding skills. Since I don't have the time to make it to real trails very often I am building my skills any way I can. I hope my local outlaw hole/trail dries up soon.
    Sucks living on the plains.

  8. #8
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    I'm feeling the constant wet trail issues, u can keep ur rain quit sending it my way

    I guess I dont notice my lower engagement anymore and have gotten in the habit to shift if I don't feel the tension on my pedals. But too I dont bother with going full technical skills like that. Just not interested in it for myself, but those I see do it I always think how awesome it is to see pull the sweet moves where I either have to slow way down to try and negotiate or walk it.

    Ull get used to it. Only point I know that helps is dropping to smaller cogs in the rear. Trade off is power needed to move goes up. More u ride and practice more ull find what works and how to make nuisances work for u instead of against u.
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  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    OP, since you're getting some of the other view, I just thought I'd mention that I spent a few weeks one winter working on specific technical skills. Wheelies, bunny hops and manuals. I never could find the balance point for a wheelie, but it's the same action as a kind of front wheel lift I use constantly on uphill singletrack. On a similar theme, I'm back to cheating my bunny hops, but I got a lot smoother. And manuals are, IMO, a necessity to negotiate a descent with drops with any kind of speed.

    So I bet you find what you're doing useful for actual trail riding, once the weather where you are lets you back on the trails.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
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    If it really takes up to 1/2 of a turn (180 degrees) for your freewheel to engage then I'd say there's something wrong with it. It might be less and feel like 1/2 a turn. Play with it off the bike and measure.

  11. #11
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    In answer to my rained out condition.
    I ride sometimes in a playa lake. There have been some 4 wheelers and dirt bike riding there and cut a few trails. We had some almost drought buster rains
    in the last few weeks. It is pretty full but going down. Once it does dry up I can go back to riding it.

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