1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    fork travel and frame

    How do you know which fork goes to a frame? I have an older kona muni mula and a 120mm fork. I am not sure if it is the correct frame for that. Do you think I can put those fork on it? Thanks

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    http://bikepedia.com/QuickBike/BikeS...1138&Type=bike

    It's probably too tall a fork. Expect truckish handling and maybe broken top and down tubes if you do it.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
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  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I still don't think you can put that fork on it, at least without a travel reducer. But at least 80mm forks are still readily available. What fork is it?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    its an rst launch. That is not my first bike, i want to make another bike from the components I already have. I would prefer not to buy more stuff

  6. #6
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    Not to hijack your thread, but I have been wondering about this myself.

    What's the rule of thumb on this issue?

    You can only put a fork with the same travel as the one that originally came on the bike?

    What about just 20mm more travel?

    What about less travel? (Not sure why, but I'll ask anyway.)

  7. #7
    keeping it dirty
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    Been wondering about this too. I have a 2000 GT Aggressor that originally came with some Suntour 63mm fork. I recently put on a 100mm Tora, and the handling is fine. I don't do downhill or jumps, pretty much pavement and XC type stuff.

  8. #8
    pants on head retarded
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    Most frames are designed for a particular fork length. Longer travel generally entails a longer fork. What a longer fork does is slackens out the head-tube angle which has a significant effect on handling. Generally a slacker head tube is slower and less nimble turning, but more stable at speed and downhill (the wheel is further out ahead of you). It is a tradeoff between handling and stability. Less travel than designed for straightens out the front end, brings the wheel closer to you and will generally result in poor handling (very noticeable on downhill turns).

    HOWEVER - As mentioned, bikes are designed around a particular fork length. Extending it puts more strain on the head tube (your wheel effectively has a greater lever arm pulling on the head tube and downtube) and can cause frame failure. I'd dig into the manuals for the bike, there's usually a reference for the forks you can put on there (typically a travel range). It may say it's good for 80-120mm forks, in which case go for it provided you're OK with the handling changes. You'll find a lot of hardtails these days that are designed for 100 to 140 mm forks.

  9. #9
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    Thanks yurtinus! Makes sense. I'm not a very physics-minded kind of guy, but you dumbed it down for me.

  10. #10
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    the problem now is, my bike is from 2001, where can i get its manual!!!!!!!!!!!???

  11. #11
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    dude just put the fork on there and go ride...... if the frame snaps and you bust your teeth at least you were warned that it might happen.....

  12. #12
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Ever spend any time on rigid bikes?

    I was shocked at how much better they handle than my bike did with an RST fork. The wheel actually tracked better, it's just a little more of a beating to ride them. When I started, all "real" mountain bikes were already coming with suspension forks, so I never rode rigid until about a year ago. Now I wish I had the space and money to own another bike, with a rigid front end.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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