1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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Thread: fork travel

  1. #1
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    fork travel

    How do you measure a fork's travel? Is it the total measure of part that goes into the fork's leg?

  2. #2
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    Usually with a zip tie. What is the fork in question?

  3. #3
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    Yes. Usually, a little bit of the stanchion won't go in.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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    Quote Originally Posted by GoBuffs
    Usually with a zip tie. What is the fork in question?
    an rst launch

  5. #5
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    The bottom CM of travel is normally either a bottom out bumper, hydraulic dampener or as RST, they probably just shoved a dead rat in there.

    So this means you will be unlikely to use the full travel on all but the hardest drops. So round up the Zip to the nearest cm to get a more realistic travel.

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    That's the fork you're planning to put on that beautiful older Kona? That's kind of like this...



    Stick a Kona P2 fork on the front and ride the hell out of it. It'll handle better and you'll be less likely to lose teeth doing drops.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaveGiant
    RST, they probably just shoved a dead rat in there.

    .
    Nice one, made me snort coffee. Had to go look at what a Launch was, found only this http://wheelworld.com/product/rst-20...h-oem-6176.htm. I'd get a good rigid fork instead of that thing.
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    That's the fork you're planning to put on that beautiful older Kona? That's kind of like this...



    Stick a Kona P2 fork on the front and ride the hell out of it. It'll handle better and you'll be less likely to lose teeth doing drops.

    I also have a 29er surly fork. Would that go on the Kona?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markleo
    I also have a 29er surly fork. Would that go on the Kona?
    Yes, probably, assuming you're planning to use disc brakes.

    In swapping forks around and between suspension and rigid forks, the things you have to match are steer tube width and brake height. Next, you want to get a similar axle-crown height, or at least make an informed decision about a different a-c. And a few forks, like Fishers, have a different enough rake to possibly make a difference.

    An 80mm fork set up firmish and at sag tends to have an a-c of about 450mm. The Karate Monkey fork (is that the one you had in mind?) has an a-c of 468mm. The extra 18mm will slacken the head angle about a degree. You may or may not notice the difference. Since you haven't ridden this bike, I guess you won't have any previous experience to compare to... So if it feels really truckish, you might want a shorter fork. But you will get much more precise steering with that rigid fork than you would with the RST.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
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    So I have tried both RST Launch and the 29er Karate Monkey forks. The KM is by far better. The bike feels lighter (and it is lighter) the front is more responsive and I did not feel the need of suspension. Thanks for your answers.

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